brain function http://wamc.org en Best of 2013 - Non-Fiction - Simon Winchester's "The Man With The Electrified Brain" http://wamc.org/post/best-2013-non-fiction-simon-winchesters-man-electrified-brain <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.simonwinchester.com/" style="line-height: 1.5;">Simon Winchester</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> has never shied away from big, even enormous, topics—as evidenced by his bestselling biography of the Atlantic Ocean, his account of the </span>Krakatoa<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> volcanic eruption, and his wildly popular </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">The Professor and the Madman</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary.</span></p><p></p><p>In his new memoir, <em>The Man with the Electrified Brain</em>, he takes on arguably his most daunting subject yet: his own flirtation with madness, and one of nature’s greatest and most enduring mysteries, the human brain.</p><p> Mon, 30 Dec 2013 16:12:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 72940 at http://wamc.org Best of 2013 - Non-Fiction - Simon Winchester's "The Man With The Electrified Brain" "Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing" with Po Bronson http://wamc.org/post/top-dog-science-winning-and-losing-po-bronson <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>What are the differences between a winning and losing performance? Why are we able to rise to the challenge one day, but wilt from it the next? Can we in fact become better competitors? In <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1455515159/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1455515159&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wamcnortheast-20">Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing</a><img alt="" border="0" height="1" src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wamcnortheast-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1455515159" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" width="1"></em>, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman use cutting edge science to tease out the hidden factors at the core of every great triumph - and every tragic failure.</p><p><a href="http://www.pobronson.com/">Po Bronson</a> joins us.</p><p> Tue, 09 Apr 2013 14:35:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 59161 at http://wamc.org "Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing" with Po Bronson "On Looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes" by Alexandra Horowitz http://wamc.org/post/looking-eleven-walks-expert-eyes-alexandra-horowitz <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.insideofadog.com/author.php" style="line-height: 1.5;">Alexandra Horowitz</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> joins us this morning to talk about her new book, </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1439191255/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1439191255&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wamcnortheast-20">On Looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes</a><img alt="" border="0" height="1" src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wamcnortheast-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1439191255" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" width="1"></em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, which shows us how to see the spectacle of the ordinary—to practice, as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle put it, “the observation of trifles.”</span></p><p><em>On Looking</em> is structured around a series of eleven walks the author takes, mostly in her Manhattan neighborhood, with experts on a diverse range of subjects, including an urban sociologist, the well-known artist Maira Kalman, a geologist, a physician, and a sound designer.</p><p> Thu, 24 Jan 2013 16:35:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 56409 at http://wamc.org "On Looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes" by Alexandra Horowitz "Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes" by Maria Konnikova http://wamc.org/post/mastermind-how-think-sherlock-holmes-maria-konnikova <p>No fictional character is more renowned for his powers of thought and observation than Sherlock Holmes. But is his extraordinary intellect merely a gift of fiction, or can we learn to cultivate these abilities ourselves, to improve our lives at work and at home?</p><p>We can, says psychologist and journalist Maria Konnikova, and in her book <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0670026573/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wamcnortheast-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0670026573">Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes</a><img alt="" border="0" height="1" src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wamcnortheast-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0670026573" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" width="1"></em>, she shows us how.&nbsp;</p><p> Mon, 07 Jan 2013 15:10:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 55180 at http://wamc.org "Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes" by Maria Konnikova Julia Soto Lebentritt on the lullaby and elder care http://wamc.org/post/julia-soto-lebentritt-lullaby-and-elder-care <p>WAMC's Alan Chartock speaks with Julia Soto Lebentritt, an eldercare case manager, bereavement facilitator and therapeutic activities director. Lebentritt, the owner of Spontaneous Care Communications, is the author of a new book called <em>As Long As You Sing, I’ll Dance</em>. She is director of The Lullaby Project.</p><p> Wed, 02 Jan 2013 16:40:09 +0000 Alan Chartock 54911 at http://wamc.org Julia Soto Lebentritt on the lullaby and elder care Researchers Say Daydreaming Aids High Function Brain Activity http://wamc.org/post/researchers-say-daydreaming-aids-high-function-brain-activity <p>A recently released study says that daydreaming may actually be beneficial to high-level brain activity. WAMC&rsquo;s Melissa Bunning reports.…</p><p>Contrary to popular belief, our brains are functioning at higher levels when our minds wander.&nbsp; Dr. Jonathan Schooler of the University of California, Santa Barbara, explains&hellip;…</p><p>Schooler, and Kalina Christoff of the University of British Columbia, took functional magnetic resonance images, or fMRI scans, of subjects as they were instructed to press a button when numbers appeared on a screen.</p> Thu, 26 Jul 2012 16:20:00 +0000 Melissa Bunning 44041 at http://wamc.org