celebrity http://wamc.org en "The Little Girl Who Fought The Great Depression: Shirley Temple And 1930s America" http://wamc.org/post/little-girl-who-fought-great-depression-shirley-temple-and-1930s-america <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world’s box-office champion, a record never equaled. By early 1935 her mail was reported as four thousand letters a week, and hers was the second-most popular girl’s name in the country.</p><p>What distinguished Shirley Temple from every other Hollywood star of the period—and everyone since—was how brilliantly she shone. Amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come. In <em>The Little Girl Who Fought The Great Depression: Shirley Temple And 1930s America</em>, distinguished cultural historian John F. Kasson shows how the most famous, adored, imitated, and commodified child in the world astonished movie goers, created a new international culture of celebrity, and revolutionized the role of children as consumers.</p><p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:35:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 95345 at http://wamc.org "The Little Girl Who Fought The Great Depression: Shirley Temple And 1930s America" Letters Of Note: An Eclectic Collection Of Correspondence Deserving Of A Wider Audience http://wamc.org/post/letters-note-eclectic-collection-correspondence-deserving-wider-audience <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><em>Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience</em> is a collection of more than 125 letters offers a never-before-seen glimpse of the events and people of history—the brightest and best, the most notorious, and the endearingly everyday. It is compiled by Shaun Usher - as is the website of the <a href="http://www.lettersofnote.com/">same name</a>.</p><p>From Virginia Woolf's heart-breaking suicide letter, to Queen Elizabeth II's recipe for drop scones sent to President Eisenhower; from the first recorded use of the expression 'OMG' in a letter to Winston Churchill, to Gandhi's appeal for calm to Hitler; and from Iggy Pop's beautiful letter of advice to a troubled young fan, to Leonardo da Vinci's remarkable job application letter, Letters of Note is a celebration of the power of written correspondence which captures the humour, seriousness, sadness and brilliance that make up all of our lives.</p><p> Mon, 23 Jun 2014 15:12:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 93212 at http://wamc.org Letters Of Note: An Eclectic Collection Of Correspondence Deserving Of A Wider Audience "Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses" by Bess Lovejoy http://wamc.org/post/rest-pieces-curious-fates-famous-corpses-bess-lovejoy <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">It has been said that in the long run, we are all dead.</span></p><p>But for some of the most influential figures in history, death marked the start of a new adventure. The famous deceased have been stolen, burned, sold, pickled, frozen, stuffed, impersonated, and even filed away in a lawyer’s office.</p><p>Counterfeiters tried to steal Lincoln’s corpse. Einstein’s brain went on a cross-country road trip. And after Lord Horatio Nelson perished at Trafalgar, his sailors submerged him in brandy—which they drank.</p><p>From Mozart to Hitler, <em>Rest in Pieces</em> is a book that connects the lives of the famous dead to the hilarious and horrifying adventures of their corpses, and traces the evolution of cultural attitudes toward death. Bess Lovejoy is a writer, researcher, and editor based in Seattle.</p><p> Thu, 14 Mar 2013 15:35:00 +0000 Joe Donahue 59864 at http://wamc.org "Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses" by Bess Lovejoy