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Pat Bradley/WAMC

This week the nation is recognizing the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.  But this week also marks the anniversary of another mega-storm that tracked across our region four years ago today. 

UAlbany

10 years on, New Orleans and several other communities across the south continue to rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina --- volunteers from all over the world came together to help rebuild --- including several from the Capital Region.

Paul Caiano's Midday Forecast

33 minutes ago
Newschannel 13 Meteorologist Paul Caiano
WNYT

Newschannel 13 meteorologist Paul Caiano delivers the Midday Weather Summary for Friday, August 28, 2015.

I scream. You scream. We all scream for….you guessed it, ice cream! This sweet treat is a hallmark of summer, and universally enjoyed the world over in many different flavors, colors and forms. From soft-serve to gelato, black cherry to death by chocolate, we’ll have you screaming for ice cream by the end of this show. Danny Mazzursky and Matt Scott of the SoCo Creamery in Great Barrington join us, as well as Flavio Lichtenthal of No. 6 Depot Roastery and Café in Stockbridge, with whom they've partnered on a special flavor of ice cream.

  Natural disasters don't matter for the reasons we think they do. They generally don't kill a huge number of people. Most years more people kill themselves than are killed by Nature's tantrums. And using standard measures like Gross Domestic Product (GDP) it is difficult to show that disasters significantly interrupt the economy.

It's what happens after the disasters that really matters-when the media has lost interest and the last volunteer has handed out a final blanket, and people are left to repair their lives. What happens is a stark expression of how unjustly unequal our world has become. The elite make out well-whether they belong to an open market capitalist democracy or a closed authoritarian socialist state.

In The Disaster Profiteers, John Mutter argues that when no one is looking, disasters become a means by which the elite prosper at the expense of the poor.

  On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina's monstrous winds and surging water overwhelmed the protective levees around low-lying New Orleans, Louisiana. Eighty percent of the city flooded, in some places under twenty feet of water. Property damages across the Gulf Coast topped $100 billion. One thousand eight hundred and thirty-three people lost their lives.

Don Brown tells the story through words and illustration in Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans.

  Congressman Chris Gibson of New York’s 19th District was still active military when Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast 10 years ago.

In today’s Congressional Corner he speaks with Alan Chartock hurricane preparedness and severe weather recovery.

  After seven years of service as the president of Tulane University, Scott Cowen watched the devastation of his beloved New Orleans at the hands of Hurricane Katrina.

When federal, state, and city officials couldn't find their way to decisive action, Cowen, known for his gutsy leadership, quickly partnered with a coalition of civic, business, and nonprofit leaders looking to work around the old institutions to revitalize and transform New Orleans.

wikipedia.org

A group of people involved in the medical marijuana industry are meeting for a seminar in Sheffield, Massachusetts Saturday. The Cannabis Research and Patient Care Seminar will feature panel discussions focused on how the use of medical marijuana has developed in Massachusetts. Commonwealth voters approved medical marijuana in 2012 and the first dispensary opened this June in Salem.

8/28/15 Panel

3 hours ago

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

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