NPR News

Pages

Around the Nation
3:33 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Cash-Strapped Cities Struggle To Bury Their Unclaimed Dead

Detroit's finances are so tight that unclaimed bodies can wait months or years for a pauper's burial. To help, Perry Funeral Home in Detroit has been holding free memorial services and cut-rate burials for unclaimed remains for years, like this service in 2009.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:34 am

Shrinking government budgets are changing not only how people live, but also how some municipalities deal with death. In Detroit, funding is so tight that when a homeless person dies, it can take a year or more to receive even a simple pauper's burial.

I met T.C. Latham several years ago, panhandling in downtown Detroit. He was short with a scraggly beard, bent glasses missing one lens and, for the most part, on the good side of the police.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:32 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Air Force Trains Special Lawyers For Sexual Assault Victims

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

Many victims of sexual assault in the military say only one experience comes close to the pain of the actual crime, and that's going to court to bring charges against the attacker.

This is believed to be one reason why so few victims come forward and report these crimes, and now the Air Force is hoping a new team of lawyers will help to change that.

At Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama, a tall three-star general stands in front of a class of JAG officers — Air Force lawyers. He tells them they are pioneers in a new field, and then lays a heavy responsibility on them.

Read more
Parallels
3:31 am
Mon June 3, 2013

For Young Somali Journalists, Work Often Turns Deadly

Reporter Donna Ali, 18, awaits her turn to go on air. Shabelle hires reporters as young as 15.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:05 pm

Shabelle Media is Somalia's largest news outlet — and a very dangerous place to work. Of the 12 journalists gunned down in the country last year, four were reporting for Shabelle.

A number of the reporters are teenagers, some as young as 15. The reporters almost never venture out of the office, which is outfitted with sleeping quarters and a kitchen.

Why are Shabelle's young journalists being targeted more than others?

Read more
Business
3:29 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Surf Air Offers 'All You Can Fly' For A Monthly Fee

Surf Air CEO Wade Eyerly stands in front of one of the airline's turboprop planes in Burbank, Calif. Eyerly boasts that Surf Air will offer frequent commuters a corporate jet experience for not much more than regular airline prices.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

A new airline with an innovative, "all you can fly" business model is about to take off. Federal regulators have just given California-based Surf Air permission to begin passenger service.

Surf Air is a big idea with small planes. For a flat monthly fee, subscribers will be able to take all the trips they want among four California cities: San Francisco, Monterey, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles.

The airline's co-founder and CEO Wade Eyerly boasts that Surf Air will offer frequent commuters a corporate jet experience for not that much more than regular airline prices.

Read more
Live At The Village Vanguard
8:06 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Kenny Barron Quintet: Live At The Village Vanguard

Kenny Barron.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:07 pm

Among jazz musicians, especially in New York City, pianist Kenny Barron is considered an institution. He spent years in bands led by the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Yusef Lateef and Stan Getz, and brings that wisdom to every note. He's put out dozens of albums, continues to write new music, and turns up in classrooms and on concert stages throughout the city. And he continues to play brilliantly, with clarity and ebullience alike — his latest album pairs him with an all-Brazilian band.

Read more
Ask Me Another
8:06 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Lesser-Known Knights

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 10:19 am

We all know King Arthur's famous Knights of the Round Table, like Sir Galahad, sometimes referred to as the Knight of the Holy Grail, or Sir Lancelot, the Knight of the Lake. But do you know the Knight of Scales, Fangs and Coils: Sir Pent? (Say it aloud a few times.) In this game, host Ophira Eisenberg offers more descriptions of a word or phrase whose first syllable sounds like "Sir."

Read more
Field Recordings
8:05 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Wild Nothing: Nuanced Pop At 8,500 Feet

Wild Nothing at Mount San Jacinto for a Field Recording, recorded in April 2013.
NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 3:05 pm

When most people think of Palm Springs, visions of softly baked desert landscapes come to mind. However, upon arriving at the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway, we were warned that the temperature differential between the desert and the top cliff of the Chino Canyon was about 30 degrees — cold enough that it would require warm clothing and an adventurous spirit. But Wild Nothing singer-songwriter Jack Tatum and his tour players were game to load onto the rotating tram car and ascend to more than 8,500 feet above sea level.

Read more
World Cafe
8:05 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Jamie Lidell On World Cafe

Jamie Lidell.
Lindsey Rome Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:17 am

British producer and singer Jamie Lidell is one of electronic music's funkiest solo practitioners. When Lidell visited World Cafe in 2006 to support his successful album Multiply, he told host David Dye that he had been called the "one-man human funk tornado" — a moniker he earns yet again in this session.

In this installment of World Cafe, Lidell plays songs from his latest self-titled album and discusses the process of making the record at his new home studio in Nashville.

Read more
Three-Minute Fiction
6:03 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

The Shirt

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 5:17 pm

She was cleaning out the closet, looking for items to give to Goodwill, when she found it. It was balled up at the back of the top shelf and had sat, collecting dust, for how long? Eight years? Nine? At least since they'd moved into the house and Will was a baby. It was Ted's old shirt from his single days, part of his "going out" outfit that he thought was so retro hip and cool, but which was really just fugly.

Read more
Three-Minute Fiction
6:03 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Litter

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 5:18 pm

I found your soul discarded in the street today.

On a three by five index card, you scrawled in heavy black permanent marker letters, "YOU NOW OWN MY SOUL." Initialed under that. Today's date under that. It's a neat little binding contract. I bet it would hold up in the highest court, even if you meant it as a joke. You shouldn't be so cavalier with your immortal essence. I spied it between a wad of chewing gum and a mangled plastic bottle. Anyone could have found this card where it laid half-in, half-out of the gutter with the collected effluvia of a thousand passers-by.

Read more

Pages