NPR News

Pages

Author Interviews
5:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Mapping 'The World' Of A Remote Afghan Village

In Oqa, Afghanistan, Boston weaves a saddlebag for her husband's donkey. The weavers of Oqa also weave large carpets, earning less than $1 a day for their work.
Courtesy Anna Badkhen

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

When freelance journalist Anna Badkhen returned to Afghanistan in 2011, she set her eyes on a region so remote it doesn't exist on Google Maps.

In her new book, The World Is A Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village, Badkhen chronicles her time in Oqa - a rural, rainless village of 240 people and "40 doorless huts."

For many of its residents, survival hinges on the fingers of women and children. They engage in the local tradition of carpet weaving, earning about 40 cents a day for carpets that eventually sell for $5,000 to $20,000 abroad.

Read more
Books News & Features
5:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Arthur Geisert's 'Thunderstorm' Celebrates Life On The Prairie

Arthur Geisert's Thunderstorm follows a tempest in the rural Midwest.
Enchanted Lion Books

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:39 am

Arthur Geisert is the author of more than two dozen children's picture books. Three of his titles have won The New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book Award. He's most famous for his intricate illustrations of the Midwest — sprawling prairie, family farms and his signature mischievous pigs.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Darrell Issa Calls White House Press Secretary A 'Paid Liar'

California Rep. Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, questioning Attorney General Eric Holder last week.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Rep. Darrell Issa, a Republican from California, took a heavy shot at White House Press Secretary Jay Carney today on CNN.

Issa said Carney was a "paid liar." He said Carney was "making things up" when he said the IRS targeting of Tea Party groups was undertaken by "rogue" local employees.

The review, said Issa, was "coordinated directly from headquarters in Washington."

Read more
Song Travels
4:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Pink Martini's Thomas Lauderdale On 'Song Travels'

"I think that's maybe my best strength as a musician: the ability to accompany and to breathe with whoever's taking the lead," Thomas Lauderdale says.
Autumn de Wilde

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 5:23 pm

Pianist Thomas Lauderdale is the co-founder of the celebrated orchestral ensemble Pink Martini, which bridges classical, jazz, world music and old-fashioned pop.

"I'm inching my way towards Liberace land every day," Lauderdale says, laughing after opening with a rollicking take on "Malaguena," composed by Cuba's equivalent of George Gershwin, Ernesto Lecuona.

Read more
You Must Read This
4:08 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Donald Justice's 'Collected Poems' Offer Refuge From The Rain

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 9:09 am

Mary Szybist's latest collection of poetry is called Incarnadine.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:08 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Quadron: For Love Of The Slow Jam

Quadron is the duo of Robin Hannibal and Coco O. Their new album is called Avalanche.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:33 am

It started with two young Danes growing up in Copenhagen, with a somewhat unorthodox love for 1970s soul music.

"It's not part of the culture and the history," Coco O., the singing half of the duo Quadron, explains. "Soul music was kind of a cute thing, but not serious. Rock music was serious."

Read more
Music Interviews
4:05 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Eleanor Friedberger Unashamed Of Her Favorite Sounds

Eleanor Friedberger's new solo album is Personal Record.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

Eleanor Friedberger was born in 1976, a little too late to have experienced much of that decade's music firsthand. But the singer-songwriter says she quickly made up for lost time.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:23 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Detroit Museum Not The First To Consider Selling Out

Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of Postman Roulin is part of the collection in the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. The financially troubled city of Detroit is eyeing the sale of its prized artworks.
aPic Getty Images

Detroit doesn't have to wait for Antiques Roadshow to come to town to know the city owns priceless treasures. The city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts holds works by van Gogh, Matisse, Renoir and other artists that could bring in tens of millions of dollars each.

And they just might sell. With the city more than $15 billion in debt, Kevyn Orr, the state-appointed emergency manager trying to straighten out Detroit's finances, has asked the museum to inventory its works with an eye toward potentially selling them off.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Egypt Court Says Upper House Of Parliament Elected Illegally

Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court ruled Sunday that the country's upper house of parliament — the so-called Shura council — was illegally elected.

As CBS News reports, that is a serious blow to President Mohammed Morsi's Freedom and Justice party, the political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood.

It will essentially cast a pretty big question mark over the constitution the Shura Council drafted and will no doubt embolden the opposition. CBS News explains:

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
2:12 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Keep Your I On The Prize

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 6:52 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up two-word phrase in which the letter I is inserted somewhere inside the first word to get the second word.

Last week's challenge: Think of a word starting with G. Change the G to a T and rearrange the letters after the T. The result will be a new word with the same meaning as the original word.

Answer: Giant; titan

Winner: Bonnie Kind of Germantown, Md.

Read more

Pages