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The Salt
3:22 am
Mon April 22, 2013

How Coffee Brings The World Together

The best coffee comes from high altitudes with a warm climate like in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 3:51 pm

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
3:20 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Want More Gender Equality At Work? Go To An Emerging Market

Petrobras state-owned oil company CEO Maria das Gracas Silva Foster makes a speech during the Women's Forum Brazil 2012 in Sao Paulo, Brazil last year.
Yasuyoshi Chiba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 10:11 am

A White House report puts it bluntly: "Today, younger women are more likely to graduate from college than are men and are more likely to hold a graduate school degree."

For the past decade more American women than men have earned undergraduate and Master's degrees; and in the past three years, they've outpaced men at the doctoral level, too.

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The Two-Way
1:26 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Battling Obstacles, Chinese Relief Crews Seek Quake Victims

Chinese rescuers walk through wreckage to reach isolated Baoxing country after the earthquake in Ya'an, southwest China's Sichuan province on Sunday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 11:30 pm

"We lost everything in such a short time," a Chinese college student tells The Associated Press.

An earthquake in southwestern China Saturday caused his family's home to collapse, crushing his grandfather.

Xinhua news agency reports at least 186 people were killed by the quake, more than 11,000 were injured and nearly two dozen are missing.

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The Two-Way
10:14 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Legally Bombed: Hubby's DUI Charge Lands Witherspoon In Tank

Actress Reese Witherspoon and her husband, Jim Toth, watch an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles in March.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 9:32 pm

Reese Witherspoon and her husband, James Toth, were arrested early Friday morning in Atlanta, Variety reports. A police report obtained by Variety says a state trooper saw Toth weaving over a double line.

"Toth appeared disheveled and his breath smelled of alcohol, according to the police report, prompting the officer to administer a sobriety test," Variety reports.

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A Blog Supreme
8:03 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Tito Puente: 90 Years Of Getting People To Dance

Tito Puente on vibraphone at the Palladium.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 7:38 pm

The percussionist and bandleader Tito Puente would have celebrated his 90th birthday this weekend on April 20. And the recently released box set Quatro: The Definitive Collection is a great place to start celebrating the once and forever King of Latin Music. It captures the driving sound of big band mambo and cha-cha-cha that launched people onto dance floors for decades.

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Author Interviews
8:03 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

For A Student Of Theology, Poetry Reverberates

Nate Klug is a poet, translator and candidate for ordained ministry in the United Church of Christ. He lives in New Haven, Conn., where he studies at Yale Divinity School.
Frank Brown Courtesy Nate Klug

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 4:56 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and NPR is celebrating by asking young poets what poetry means to them. This week, Weekend Edition speaks with Nate Klug, whose poems have appeared in Poetry, Threepenny Review and other journals. Klug is also a master of divinity candidate at the Yale Divinity School and a candidate for ordination in the United Church of Christ. "It's nice to go home from a day of thinking about the church to this whole other world of poetry," he says. "But obviously there are some really amazing ways that they intersect."

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Art & Design
8:02 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

When Sculpting Cedar, This Artist Is Tireless And Unsentimental

Michael Bodycomb Ursula von Rydingsvard/Galerie Lelong

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 10:42 pm

Ursula von Rydingsvard makes huge sculptures out of red cedar. The 70-year-old is one of the few women working in wood on such a scale.

Her pieces are in the permanent collections of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art. And now they're also part of a new show at Manhattan's Museum of Arts and Design. It's called "Against the Grain" — a phrase that could just as well describe the sculptor's life and career.

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Author Interviews
6:23 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

'Humanity' May Get Second Chance In Jean Thompson's New Novel

chuwy iStockphoto.com

In Jean Thompson's latest novel, The Humanity Project, humanity isn't doing so well and could use some help. Sean is a wayward carpenter whose bad luck with women turns into even worse luck: He's addicted to painkillers, and he and his teenage son Conner are facing eviction. Linnea is the teen survivor of a school shooting who travels west to California to live with a father she barely knows. Mrs. Foster is a wealthy woman who's taken to living with feral cats, and whose "Humanity Project" just might take a chance on people who thought they were out of luck.

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Author Interviews
6:07 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Fire, Water, Air, Earth: Michael Pollan Gets Elemental In 'Cooked'

Penguin Press

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 4:56 pm

In his systematic scrutiny of the modern American food chain, Michael Pollan has explored everything from the evolution of edible plants to the industrial agricultural complex. In his newest book, he charts territory closer to home — or rather, at home, in his kitchen.

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation surveys how the four classical elements — fire, water, air and earth — transform plants and animals into food. Pollan joins NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss the merits of slow home cooking and his adventures in fermentation.

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The Sunday Conversation
6:06 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

One Amputee's Message Of Hope For Boston's Bombing Victims

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 4:56 pm

As Lindsay Ess watched the events in Boston unfold last week, she wondered if she could help the victims of the Marathon bombing. When she found out that many had lost limbs in the explosion, she knew she could.

Ess is a quadruple amputee. In 2006, she was diagnosed with Crohn's disease. She underwent surgery for her condition, but it went terribly wrong. She developed septic shock, which lead to complete organ failure. She was in the intensive care unit for five months.

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