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Ask Me Another
7:57 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

Musical Weather Report

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 8:52 am

Jonathan Coulton makes it rain in this game, which is full of weather conditions mentioned in popular song titles. Can you guess the original song title after he's rewritten the lyrics? As Bob Dylan might say: The answers, my friend, are blowing in this meteorological phenomenon that is like a strong breeze.

Plus, Jonathan finishes out the round with a rendition of "Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head" from Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

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The Record
7:57 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Night Of Worship In The Church Of Badu

Erykah Badu answers questions on stage during the Red Bull Music Academy, a series of lectures and performances in New York City.
Tony Blasko Red Bull Content Pool

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:08 pm

Erykah Badu doesn't think she's old enough to be anybody's godmother, and the first time somebody asked her to fulfill that role (Solange, because of course) she said, how dare you. Badu was onstage at the Brooklyn Museum on Tuesday night, an event that's part of the Red Bull Music Academy, a series of shows and lectures happening this month in New York City.

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Movie Reviews
7:56 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Modern 'Maisie,' Still Yoked To Absurd Adults

True Blood star Alexander Skarsgard turns in a sensitive performance as a sort of surrogate dad for the poorly parented title character (a restrained Onata Aprile) in What Maisie Knew, a quietly stirring update of the Henry James novel.
JoJo Whilden Millennium Entertainment

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 3:30 pm

By the end of What Maisie Knew, what 6-year-old Maisie knows is the thing everyone in the theater has figured out in the first five minutes: This poor little girl has two of the most horrible movie parents since Faye Dunaway got her hands on a wire hanger.

They fight or are distracted so much that Maisie is often left to her own devices, making herself meals or scrounging for cash to pay for the pizza her parents ordered.

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All Songs Considered
6:38 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

Viking's Choice: Chuck Johnson Plays A Raga That Rages

Chuck Johnson.
Carly Hoopes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:41 am

American Primitive music is flourishing right now. Electric and acoustic guitarists like William Tyler, Steve Gunn and Glenn Jones all have stellar releases out or on the way in 2013, and each digs different paths into this blues-based style.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
6:37 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

Is Massively Open Online Education A Threat Or A Blessing?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 4:13 pm

In fall 2011, Sebastian Thrun, a research professor at Stanford, and Peter Norvig, the top scientist at Google, teamed up to develop and teach a free, online course on artificial intelligence. Their aim, as Norvig said in an impassioned and compelling TED talk, was to develop a course at least as good as, if not better than, the course they teach together at Stanford. They'd put the result online and make it available to everyone, for free.

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You Must Read This
6:37 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Chatty, Pensive, 'Rude As A Goat's Beard' Child Soldier

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 5:54 am

A. Igoni Barrett is the author of Love Is Power, Or Something Like That: Stories.

The reign of the child soldier in African literature is over.

Now, in the aftermath of its decline, the props of the regime — as with the downfall of your common blood-and-flesh despot — are being dismantled. The discerning reader has long grown weary of dead and dying stereotypes of the modern African novel: Civil wars. Black magic. Vulture-stalked refugees. In life as in literature, the stranglehold of these banal memes on African narratives is broken.

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National Security
5:44 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

The Hidden Cost Of The Drone Program

A model of a drone is hoisted in the air at a protest of the U.S. military's use of drones during a demonstration on April 3 in New York.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 4:02 pm

A faint light has begun to shine in recent weeks on the secretive U.S. program of drone strikes and targeted killings.

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The Two-Way
5:33 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

The Threat To Indonesia's Biodiversity, Foretold In The 1800s

British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace was not only a key figure in developing the theory of evolution in the mid-19th century but also had the foresight to call for saving endangered species.

Wallace, who died 100 years ago this year, did his most important research in the rich biodiversity of Indonesia, and his plea for preservation is even more compelling than when he wrote it.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

Solar-Powered Airplane Completes First Leg Of U.S. Flight

The Solar Impulse takes off from Moffett Field NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., Friday, as a team member rides an electric bike alongside the plane.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The Solar Impulse, an airplane traveling across the United States using only solar power, is in Phoenix today, after reaching Arizona from California Saturday. It took the plane about 20 hours to travel from Mountain View, Calif., near San Francisco.

The aircraft is capable of flying at night as well as in daytime; the plane had about 75 percent of its battery power remaining when it landed in Arizona.

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Religion
4:08 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Search For Faith In 'Godless' Washington

The National Cathedral in Washington, D.C, is one of the world's largest cathedrals, and the seat of the Episcopal Church.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 4:03 pm

War has brought the act of faith to the forefront for those who occupy the White House. President Lincoln famously issued a call to prayer during the Civil war. Franklin Roosevelt announced D-Day to the nation with a prayer.

Today, President Obama receives a daily spiritual meditation. The man who sends those messages is a Pentecostal minister named Joshua DuBois.

When he first moved to Washington, D.C., DuBois says he had already formed an impression about the spiritual life of the town.

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