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The Changing Lives Of Women
3:00 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Lady Mechanic Initiative Trains Women For 'The Best Job'

Students at the Lady Mechanic Initiative in Lagos, Nigeria, work on cars in their open air workshop.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

The young women training to be mechanics at Nigeria's Lady Mechanic Initiative wear navy overalls and work boots and their hair is tucked under customized red caps as they repair vehicles in a garage. Customers come and go, dropping off and collecting their cars. Trainee Enogie Osagie says she faced great resistance at home when she started.

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Education
2:58 am
Thu May 2, 2013

A Rhodes-Like Scholarship For Study In China

The Schwarzman Scholars program, planned for the campus of Beijing's Tsinghua University, is described as "a 21st century college designed to inspire interchange."
Artist's rendering courtesy of Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

If you're interested in studying in China, a new scholarship program could help you on your way. Rivaling the prestigious Rhodes scholarships, the new Schwarzman Scholars program was announced recently by Stephen Schwarzman, CEO and co-founder of Blackstone Group, one of the world's biggest private-equity firms.

The financier says he plans to raise $300 million, including $100 million of his own money, to fund a new program aimed at bringing students from around the world to study at Beijing's Tsinghua University.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Iggy Pop: 'What Happens When People Disappear'

Iggy & The Stooges just released a new album, Ready to Die.
David Raccuglia Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:55 pm

Of the many things made in Michigan that have become part of the fabric of American culture — the auto industry, Motown — punk rock is often overlooked. In 1967, years before The Sex Pistols performed incendiary anthems, Iggy Pop and his band The Stooges created an explosive new sound in Detroit that would influence generations of musicians.

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The Two-Way
1:50 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Obama Administration Appeals Judge's Order On Plan B

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 8:24 am

The Obama administration filed an appeal Wednesday of a U.S. district court ruling that ordered it to end all age restrictions on the Plan B emergency contraceptive pill.

The move came a day after the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age for which the product can be purchased without a prescription from 17 to 15.

NPR's Julie Rovner reported on Wednesday's development for our Newscast unit:

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Book Reviews
11:10 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

One Of Ireland's Greatest Writers Looks Back On Eight Decades

Edna O'Brien is pictured here with her husband, the writer Ernest Gebler, in London in 1959. O'Brien's first novel, The Country Girls, was published a year later.
Edna O'Brien/Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 4:20 pm

Back in the early 1950s, as a lonely, pregnant young wife already ruing her rash elopement, Edna O'Brien sobbed through the ending of Flaubert's Madame Bovary and wondered, "Why could life not be lived at that same pitch? Why was it only in books that I could find the utter outlet for my emotions?"

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The Two-Way
9:48 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Poll: Most African-Americans Support Immigration Reform

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 9:39 pm

A new poll commissioned by The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights finds that black Americans solidly support legislation to overhaul the immigration system in the country.

A reform proposal that includes a path to citizenship received the support of 66 percent of the more than 800 African-American likely voters polled by Lake Research Partners.

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The Two-Way
9:48 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Mountain Dew Pulls Ad Called 'Most Racist ... In History'

A screen grab of a Mountain Dew commercial.
Mountain Dew

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 4:13 pm

PepsiCo announced today that it was pulling a Mountain Dew ad from all its online channels, after it was buffeted by criticism.

Boyce Watkins, a professor at Syracuse University and an outspoken social critic, called the commercial "arguably the most racist commercial in history."

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The Two-Way
9:47 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Pope Compares Bangladesh Factory Workers To 'Slave Labor'

A man pours earth Wednesday onto a grave of one of the workers who died last week in the building collapse in Bangladesh.
Wong Maye-E AP

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 6:08 am

Pope Francis has equated the wages paid to Bangladeshi workers who died in last week's building collapse to "slave labor."

More than 400 people were killed in the April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza building outside Dhaka; the building housed several garment factories that made products for Western brands.

News reports say that workers at the factories housed in the building were paid about 38 euros a month (about $50).

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The Two-Way
7:12 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

FBI Asks For Public's Help In Benghazi Investigation

The FBI is seeking information about these individuals.
FBI

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is asking the public for help in finding three individuals who were on the grounds of the U.S. mission in Benghazi, the day an attack killed four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

"These individuals may be able to provide information to help in the investigation," the FBI said in a short release.

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The Salt
6:40 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died.
Donald E. Hurlbert Smithsonian

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

"First they ate their horses, and then fed upon their dogs and cats, as well as rats, mice and snakes."

So says James Horn of the historical group Colonial Williamsburg, paraphrasing an account by colony leader George Percy of what conditions were like for the hundreds of men and women stranded in Jamestown, Va., with little food in the dead of winter in 1609.

They even ate their shoes. And, apparently, at least one person.

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