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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

For Babies, It's Better To Like What I Like

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:45 pm

Babies as young as nine months appear to approve of people who like what they like — and approve of being mean to those who don't share their tastes. Kiley Hamlin, lead author of a study in the journal Psychological Science, discusses the importance of similarity to young children.

NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Scientists Search For Gulf War Illness Answers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:14 pm

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky. Ira Flatow is out this week. Last December, Steven Coughlin, an epidemiologist at the Veterans Affairs Office of Public Health, resigned his position. And last week he told a congressional subcommittee why. He had serious ethical concerns about the research being done on Gulf War Illness at the VA.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Grand Central: An Engine Of Scientific Innovation

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:12 pm

In his book Grand Central: How A Train Station Transformed America, New York Times urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts writes of the scientific innovations pioneered at New York City's Grand Central Terminal, such as electric commuter trains and standardized time.

The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

HBO: Programming Could Be Sold Directly Through Internet Providers

HBO chief Richard Plepler speaks in New York at a 2011 screening.
Larry Busacca Getty Images for Time Warner

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:21 pm

HBO CEO Richard Plepler is saying something a lot of the television network's fans have been waiting to hear — that its content could be offered to customers directly through their Internet service providers instead of a cable company.

Right now, HBO must be purchased through a cable provider. Plepler tells Reuters that HBO Go, an online streaming service launched by the network in 2010 (but still only available as an extra to your cable TV) might also be sold through ISPs.

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U.S.
12:46 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

'Severing Love From Diapers': The Other Case Against Gay Marriage

first state to define marriage as a union of one man and one woman. Voters there legalized gay marriage in 2012." href="/post/severing-love-diapers-other-case-against-gay-marriage" class="noexit lightbox">
Zachariah Long (left) and Edward Ritchie protested last year against a gay marriage bill in Maryland. In 1973, Maryland became the first state to define marriage as a union of one man and one woman. Voters there legalized gay marriage in 2012.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 8:30 pm

Gay marriage opponents say they're protecting women and children first.

When the Supreme Court hears oral arguments about same-sex marriage next week, much of the debate will turn on legal questions surrounding issues such as federalism and due process.

But the underlying questions are more emotional, with moral objections frequently raised by members of the faith community.

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The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Man Arrested On US Airways Flight After Impersonating Pilot

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:59 am

A 61-year-old French man on a US Airways flight out of Philadelphia almost got an upgrade by playing pilot.

Philippe Jernnard of La Rochelle, France, had a ticket and was denied an upgrade for the West Palm Beach, Fla., flight departing Philadelphia International Airport on Wednesday. He later showed up in the cockpit jump seat wearing a white shirt with an Air France logo and a black jacket with epaulets, CBS News reports.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Congo Warlord Faces War Crimes After Turning Himself In

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 12:42 pm

Bosco Ntaganda, a notorious warlord accused of crimes against humanity during Congo's civil war, is headed to an international court after turning himself in at the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda earlier this week.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports that the surrender of Ntaganda, nicknamed "The Terminator," came as a surprise. He's been wanted by the International Criminal Court since 2006 for crimes against humanity, including conscripting child soldiers, murder, rape and sexual slavery allegedly committed in 2002 and 2003 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Legalized Marijuana Forcing Old Dogs To Learn New Tricks

A customer rolls a joint made of half marijuana and half tobacco in Olympia, Wash., on December 9, 2012.
Nick Adams Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:07 pm

Drug-sniffing dogs, those cute bellwethers of illegal activity, are dropping Marijuana from their repertoire in Washington state.

A 2012 ballot initiative legalized the use of marijuana in the state (although federal law still prohibits its use). Since then authorities have been working to implement the law. Part of that process is, apparently, to employ canines who don't react to the smell of marijuana. The AP explains why:

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Author Interviews
11:56 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Nathan Englander: Stories Of Faith, Family And The Holocaust

Nathan Englander grew up in an Orthodox Jewish family. He now splits his time between New York and Madison, Wis.
Juliana Sohn

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:59 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Feb. 15, 2012.

The stories in Nathan Englander's short collection that's out now in paperback are based largely on his experiences growing up as a modern Orthodox Jew with an overprotective mother.

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Faith Matters
11:52 am
Fri March 22, 2013

National Cathedral Dean On Guns, Church & Gay Marriage

The Very Reverend Gary Hall, the new dean of the National Cathedral, has been speaking out for stricter gun laws and greater acceptance of same-sex marriage. Host Michel Martin speaks to Dean Hall about those issues, and the evolving role of faith in progressive politics.

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