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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson recertified Iran's compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal late Monday, but senior administration officials emphasized that Tehran is a dangerous threat to both U.S. interests and Middle East stability.

Mitch Daniels went from running the state of Indiana, as its two-term Republican governor, to running its top flight public university, Purdue University, based in West Lafayette.

The box of prescription drugs had been forgotten in a back closet of a retail pharmacy for so long that some of the pills predated the 1969 moon landing. Most were 30 to 40 years past their expiration dates — possibly toxic, probably worthless.

But to Lee Cantrell, who helps run the California Poison Control System, the cache was an opportunity to answer an enduring question about the actual shelf life of drugs: Could these drugs from the bell-bottom era still be potent?

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

The defeat of the GOP Senate health care bill is a major blow to all Republicans involved.

President Trump, whose approval rating is lower than any recent president this early in his term, is now staring at an agenda imperiled. Despite his boasts, he has achieved little of significance through Congress. That failure is compounded by the fact that his party controls both chambers.

It's time again for one of Washington's favorite manufactured crises.

Nine months after being fired as the longtime voice of Kermit the Frog, Steve Whitmire is speaking out. He was let go in October by Disney for what was described as "unacceptable business conduct."

Whitmire says Disney's dismissal was "a betrayal" after a 27-year career devoted to carrying on the legacy of Jim Henson, the founder of the Muppets. Henson was the original voice of Kermit.

Defending President Trump on television is giving longtime conservative lawyer Jay Sekulow new prominence these days, but it's also reviving questions about a pair of charities he is involved with.

Sekulow, 61, who appeared on all five Sunday morning news shows over the weekend to address questions about Trump's ties to Russia, is a fixture in the Christian conservative movement, serving as chief counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice.

Micromanagement is routinely the top complaint people have about their bosses, and in today's good job market where workers have more options, that's a bigger problem for employers.

People might have their own definition of when a manager crosses into being too controlling, but most people would probably agree that Marjon Bell's former boss would fit.

The State Department has issued new instructions about which citizens from the six Muslim-majority countries covered by the Trump administration's travel ban are eligible for visas.

The instructions issued to U.S. embassies and consulates widen the definition of a close familial relationship to include categories such as grandparents and cousins, in accordance with a federal court ruling last week, a State Department spokesman said in a statement to The Two-Way.

It was a story that made headlines around the world.

An all-girl team from Afghanistan applied for visas to come to the First Global Challenge, an international robotics competition taking place in Washington, D.C. this week.

And their visa request was denied.

They weren't the only team to face visa hurdles. The team from Gambia — two girls and three boys — was also denied when they first applied.

The initial report of Sen. John McCain's surgery sounded simple: the removal of a blood clot above his left eye. But it was actually brain surgery, and the clot was almost 2 inches long.

The surgery prompted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to delay a vote on the health care bill until the 80-year-old McCain is well enough to return to the Senate.

Ten years ago this summer, the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas staged a coup, ousted members of the rival Fatah party and took over the Gaza Strip.

It felt it took what it deserved: Hamas had won the majority of seats in the 2006 Palestinian legislative elections, but Hamas and Fatah couldn't work out how to share power.

It led to gun battles. A 29-year-old man saw his cousin, a Fatah border guard in training, get shot in a fight with Hamas gunmen in one of the many battles that led to the coup. The man is afraid to be identified — even a decade later.

My wife is pregnant, and I'm terrified. I don't even have a baby yet, but I have an untold number of questions and concerns that wake me up in the middle of the night. And as I lie awake, I inevitably dive down a Google rabbit hole searching for information.

Iran says it has sentenced an American graduate student to 10 years in prison for spying for U.S. and British intelligence agencies. The Princeton University student was in Iran doing research when he was arrested.

Xiyue Wang, 37, is pursuing a Ph.D. in Eurasian history, studying local government in predominantly Muslim regions during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Stephen Kotkin, Wang's advisor at Princeton, says Wang came well-prepared for an extremely ambitious thesis topic.

Monday night in Las Vegas, thousands are expected to turn out for an NBA Championship game between the Los Angeles Lakers and Portland Trailblazers. Hundreds of thousands more, at least, are expected to tune in to ESPN for live coverage.

Wait, you say, it's the middle of July — a time for baseball, beach and barbecue. But men's pro basketball? Normally way off sports fans' radar screens this time of year.

But there's been nothing normal about NBA Summer League 2017.

The U.S Senate's plan to replace Obamacare would cut funding for Medicaid and other health insurance subsidies by more than $1 billion a year within five years. That has many lawmakers, doctors, hospitals and patients across Massachusetts in a state of alarm.

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And now a moment to remember Martin Landau, who also died this weekend at the age of 89. He was an Oscar-winning actor in his own right and guided younger stars. NPR's Andrew Limbong has more.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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A Jordanian military court convicted a Jordanian soldier of murder and sentenced him to life in prison for the November 2016 shooting of three members of the U.S. Army Special Forces outside an air base.

Benjamin Wolfe sticks his nose into a Ziploc bag and takes a whiff. "Ooh! That's actually kind of nice," he says. Inside the bag is a pungent, beige goop. It's a sourdough starter — a slurry of water, flour, yeasts and bacteria — from which loaves of delicious bread are born. And it's those microbes that have the attention of Wolfe, a microbiologist at Tufts University.

From one of the coldest places on Earth comes a heartwarming love story.

A pair of polar field guides got married over the weekend at a British research station, and the British Antarctic Survey says it's the first official wedding in Antarctic territory claimed by the U.K.

When the Trump administration threatened to take away federal money from “sanctuary cities” earlier this year, many of those jurisdictions doubled down, saying they had no intention of becoming an arm of the federal government by turning people over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has emerged as a fierce critic of President Trump. He’s blasted the president over immigration, health care and climate change. In doing so, Inslee has developed something of a national profile, and soon he’ll likely attract even more attention.

Although Islam is the fastest-growing religion in the world, not all people born Muslim remain Muslim. But for many, it’s not easy to leave a religion that is a major part of their lives and communities.

It's that time of year when you hear talk of "summer reading," a term that refers to books that are fun and undemanding — you know, the perfect accompaniment to lying on the beach. Such books heighten the airy sense of irresponsibility that comes with escaping the gravity of our lives back home.

President Trump is touting a newly brokered cease-fire in southwest Syria as a major foreign policy win for his White House. After years of failed peace attempts under the Obama administration, Trump has boldly speculated that the new truce could mark the beginning of the end of the war.

Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin reached the agreement during their July 7 meeting at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. It affects towns, villages and borderlands in three regions close to Jordan and Israel.

The Lithuanian man accused of defrauding two major multinational tech companies out of more than $100 million must be extradited to the U.S., a court in Vilnius ruled Monday. Evaldas Rimasauskas has been in Lithuanian custody since March, when he was indicted by U.S. prosecutors for orchestrating a massive "fraudulent email compromise scheme."

A government watchdog group says it has won a battle with the Trump administration, which will turn over visitor records for the president's Mar-a-Lago residence.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington says it will publicly release the visitor logs upon receiving them by Sept. 8.

"The public deserves to know who is coming to meet with the president and his staff," CREW Executive Director Noah Bookbinder said in a statement.

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