Dave Lucas

Capital Region Bureau Chief

Dave Lucas is WAMC’s Capital Region Bureau Chief.  Born and raised in Albany, he’s been involved in nearly every aspect of local radio since 1981. Before joining WAMC, Dave was a reporter and anchor at WGY in Schenectady. Prior to that he hosted talk shows on WYJB and WROW, including the 1999 series of overnight radio broadcasts tracking the JonBenet Ramsey murder case with a cast of callers and characters from all over the world via the internet. In 2012, Dave received a Communicator Award of Distinction for his WAMC news story "Fail: The NYS Flood Panel," which explores whether the damage from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee could have been prevented or at least curbed. Dave began his radio career as a “morning personality” at WABY in Albany.

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WAMC composite image by Dave Lucas

With public and media attention squarely focused on the New York state budget agreement, the Department of Health on Tuesday quietly filed regulations for the state’s medical marijuana program.

New York posted final regulations for the state medical marijuana program, sticking to the original script: not varying far from the much-criticized draft regulations that first appeared months ago.

wikipedia

An upstate New York man accused of helping build an X-ray device he thought would be used to kill people at a mosque and an Islamic center has asked the judge to dismiss charges, saying the entire scheme was concocted by undercover investigators.

Glendon Scott Crawford says in court papers that evidence turned over by federal prosecutors shows that from 2012 until his 2013 arrest, 59 federal and state agents worked on the case and that "no criminal enterprise existed," except as they fabricated it.

With education in flux across New York thanks to the Common Core, there's a mixed reaction to Governor Andrew Cuomo's provisions for it in the freshly finished budget.  

$1.6 billion has been allocated for education in a spending plan that includes several reforms. The budget negotiations are only the latest fault line between the governor, legislative leaders and the powerful teachers’ union.

Phil and Pam Gradwell/Flickr

Health professionals throughout New York are spreading the word: get vaccinated!

Health advocates want to convey the message that immunizing our children is good for them and for our communities, and essential to public health.   For each of the routine childhood vaccines, the national health promotion and disease prevention initiative Healthy People 2020 target is 90 percent coverage. On average, 95 percent of all students in New York are fully immunized. But recent outbreaks of long-controlled diseases and a burgeoning anti-vaccination minority have officials concerned.

The University of Connecticut women’s basketball team came through Albany over the weekend en route to its eighth straight Final Four. Downtown businesses are hopeful major NCAA events will continue coming to town.

College basketball is big business — and good for local business. Times Union Center officials — whose recent bid to host the NCAA men’s tournament in the next few seasons was denied — are hoping the success of the regional women’s tourney final could set the stage for the rights to host future tournaments.

youtube / NY Attorney General's channel

GNC Holdings Inc. said Monday that it has reached a deal with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman over its Herbal Plus products.

en.wikipedia.org

New York is drawing more and more power from wind and solar, but its renewable energy standard is set to expire at the end of the year.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Once again, New York's U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand are calling on federal regulators to pass tighter safety restrictions for crude oil transported by rail.

The newest cry came Thursday: The Senators submitted a letter to Office of Management and Budget Director Shaun Donovan calling on him to pass legislation requiring new standards as soon as possible.

City of Albany

The City of Albany is bidding farewell to a transformative police chief who has won praise for improving police-community relations.

A bagpiper led Steven Krokoff out of police headquarters Friday where fellow officers saluted and paid tribute.

Krokoff, oft-hailed as a "people’s chief," is retiring to be closer to his extended family and to take a job as chief in Milton, Georgia, outside Atlanta.

He joined the Albany Police Department in 1993.  One of the city's youngest chiefs, Krokoff was 40 when he took the job in July 2010.

U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer has launched a push to help communities around New York better afford much-needed sewer repair projects.

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