Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Florence Foster Jenkins, War Dogs, Pete’s Dragon

Upcoming:

The Addams Family - Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham, opens 8/25 Thu at 2 & 8 PM, through Sept. 4

A Night at the Movies, 1916 featuring Charlie Chaplin, an adventure serial, and Dorothy Gish as Gretchen the Greenhorn, live music by Avery Tunningley - Capitol Theater, Rome, 8/25 Thu at 7 PM (10 cents admission)

Nick Offerman & Megan Mullally - Palace Theatre, Albany 8/25 Thu

Troy Night Out (Theme: Troy History & Bicentennial) Music, art, comedy all around Troy - Downtown Troy, 8/26 Fri, 5 to 9 PM

Mary Chapin Carpenter - The Egg, Albany, 8/26 Fri at 8 PM

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, 8/26 Fri

Dance Heginbotham . . . performing Waltz Ending (music of Scott Joplin), Diamond (music of Darius Milhaud), Twin (music of music of Aphex Twin), Rockefellers (music of Raymond Scott) - PS/21, Chatham, 8/26-27, Fri-Sat at 8 PM

St. Lawrence String Quartet (music of Haydn, Golijov, John Adams) - Tannery Pond Concerts, New Lebanon, 8/27 Saturday, 8 PM

Rubblebucket - MASS MoCA (Courtyard C or Hunter Center), North Adams, Mass., 8/27 Sat at 8 PM

New movies: Mechanic: Resurrection, Equity, Southside With You, Don’t Think Twice, Don’t Breathe, Hands of Stone

  Award winning stage and screen actress Mary-Louise Parker’s new book - Dear Mr. You – shows the singular arc of her life through letters composed to the men, real and hypothetical, who have informed the person she is today.

Beginning with the grandfather she never knew, the letters range from a missive to the beloved priest from her childhood to remembrances of former lovers.

8/25/16 Panel

1 hour ago

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  John Quincy Adams was the last of his kind—a Puritan from the age of the Founders who despised party and compromise, yet dedicated himself to politics and government. The son of John Adams, he was a brilliant ambassador and secretary of state, a frustrated president at a historic turning point in American politics, and a dedicated congressman who literally died in office—at the age of 80, in the House of Representatives, in the midst of an impassioned political debate.

In John Quincy Adams, scholar and journalist James Traub draws on Adams’ diary, letters, and writings to evoke a diplomat and president whose ideas remain with us today.

  In The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland, New York Times writer and columnist Dan Barry tells the harrowing yet uplifting story of the exploitation and abuse of a resilient group of men with intellectual disability, and the heroic efforts of those who helped them to find justice and reclaim their lives.

In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom.

  A naturalist and advocate for freedom of speech, Terry Tempest Williams explores how environmental issues are social issues and ultimately matters of justice.

Her new book, The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, comes with the centennial of the National Park Service. It is a celebration of our National Parks and an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them.

  What does a ''producer'' actually do? How does one travel from that great idea for a show to a smash hit opening night on Broadway?

John Breglio cannot guarantee you a hit, but he does take the reader on a fascinating journey behind-the-scenes to where he himself once stood as a child, dreaming about the theatre. 

  This morning we talk with a brand new performing arts company in our region. The Berkshire Opera Festival’s inaugural season features a new production that takes a fresh look at Puccini's masterpiece Madama Butterfly. It is timeless love story, featuring beautiful music sung by a world-class cast.

Taking place in an apartment overlooking Nagasaki Harbor, director Jonathon Loy's production moves the action to the 1960s and sets it against the backdrop of Japan's "Golden Sixties" economic boom. Joining us this morning: Artistic Director, Co-Founder and Conductor; John Cheek, bass, singing the Bonze; and Sarah Larsen - mezzo soprano, singing Suzuki.

The Silence Of War

Aug 23, 2016

  Terry McGowan had been a beat cop, a Marine captain, and a Special Agent for the FBI before retiring at the age of fifty. But when tragedy struck the United States on September 11th, 2001, Terry felt a sense of duty to protect and serve his country.

McGowan became a Special Advisor to the Marines and was immediately put to use on the frontline of battle in Afghanistan. He later celebrated his 59th birthday dodging bullets at a Marine base nicknamed “the Alamo.”

In his new memoir, The Silence of War: An Old Marine in a Young Marine’s War, Terry McGowan details his return to combat three decades after leaving the corps. 

Guapa By Saleem Haddad

Aug 23, 2016

  Set over the course of twenty-four hours, Guapa follows Rasa, a gay man living in an unnamed Arab country, as he tries to carve out a life for himself in the midst of political and social upheaval. Rasa spends his days translating for Western journalists and pining for the nights when he can sneak his lover, Taymour, into his room.

One night Rasa's grandmother — the woman who raised him — catches them in bed together. The following day Rasa is consumed by the search for his best friend Maj, a fiery activist and drag queen star of the underground bar, Guapa, who has been arrested by the police. Ashamed to go home and face his grandmother, and reeling from the potential loss of the three most important people in his life, Rasa roams the city’s slums and prisons, the lavish weddings of the country’s elite, and the bars where outcasts and intellectuals drink to a long-lost revolution. 

8/23/16 Panel

Aug 23, 2016

  

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and Theresa Bourgeois - A PR and strategic communications consultant who has worked in policy and politics at the national, state, and local levels.

  "Whoever said you can't get sober for someone else never met my mother, Mama Jean. When I came to in a Manhattan emergency room after an overdose to the news that she was on her way from Texas, I panicked. She was the last person I wanted to see on that dark September morning, but the person I needed the most."

So begins this astonishing memoir ― by turns both darkly comic and deeply poignant ― about this native Texan's long struggle with alcohol, his complicated relationship with Mama Jean, and his sexuality. The book is listed as “Required Reading” in Mary Karr’s bestselling The Art of Memoir and was a Book Chase Top 10 Nonfiction Book of 2015.

Train At Tanglewood

Aug 22, 2016
Train at Tanglewood
Hilary Scott / Boston Symphony Orchestra

It isn’t summer without a visit by the band Train to our region. Train will be at Tanglewood tomorrow night at 7PM along with Andy Grammer. The multi-platinum band Train made its mark on music history with the Grammy Award-winning song "Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)." They also had chart-topping singles like "Meet Virginia" and "Calling All Angels." Train earned its third Grammy in 2011 for the worldwide smash "Hey Soul Sister" from Save Me, San Francisco.

That song was the top-selling single of 2010, "Hey Soul Sister" hit #1 on radio in the United States and in fifteen countries abroad. In 2014, Train released their seventh album, Bulletproof Picasso, which charted in the Top 5 that year. A new album is coming soon. But, before it does – Train comes to Tanglewood tomorrow and we get to chat with the band’s lead singer – Pat Monahan.

  The Woodstock Film Festival and Upstate Films in Rhinebeck will presents a screening of Newtown on August 24th at 8:15 p.m.

Filmed over the course of nearly three years, the filmmakers use unique access and never before heard testimonies to tell a story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history on December 14, 2012. Newtown documents a traumatized community fractured by grief and driven toward a sense of purpose.

Kim A. Snyder’s most recent film, NEWTOWN premiered in competition at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, and was hailed in Entertainment Weekly as among the “Best of Sundance.” NEWTOWN will continue to screen at premiere festivals worldwide and is poised to have a theatrical release in September 2016, with a national broadcast on PBS’s Independent Lens in early 2017.

Maria Cuomo Cole is the award-winning producer of the feature documentary, Newtown, which will be premiering at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. In her career, she has tackled such relevant subjects as gun violence, homelessness, veterans’ PTSD, Domestic Violence and sexual assault.

They will be at the screening in Rhinebeck and join us to talk about the film.

  Hundreds of millions of people live with medical conditions that require lowering sodium intake—heart disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes, to name a few—and research shows most of us would be healthier if we consumed less salt.

Featuring signature swaps, a seven-day Taste Bud Reboot, a transformation workbook, 70+ recipes for much-loved food, Low-So Good, is a tool for living well with less sodium. 

  In The Comedians, comedy historian Kliph Nesteroff brings to life a century of American comedy with real-life characters, forgotten stars, mainstream heroes and counterculture iconoclasts.

Based on over two hundred original interviews and extensive archival research, Nesteroff’s groundbreaking work is a narrative exploration of the way comedians have reflected, shaped, and changed American culture over the past one hundred years.

  In the heart of the Ottoman Empire as World War I rages, Stepan Miskjian’s world becomes undone. He is separated from his family as they are swept up in the government’s mass deportation of Armenians into internment camps. Gradually realizing the unthinkable—that they are all being driven to their deaths—he fights, through starvation and thirst, not to lose hope. He dons disguises, outmaneuvers gendarmes, and, when he least expects it, encounters the miraculous kindness of strangers.

The Hundred-Year Walk alternates between Stepan’s saga and another journey that takes place a century later, after his family discovers his long-lost journals. With his journals guiding her, Dawn Anahid MacKenn grows ever closer to the man she barely knew as a child.

David Finckel and Wu Han
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

  Wu Han and David Finckel join us to talk about their performance with The Philadelphia Orchestra at SPAC and the final two concerts this season to be performed by The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in the Spa Little Theater. 

8/19/16 Panel

Aug 19, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  For decades, conversations about poverty have focused on jobs, public assistance, parenting, and mass incarceration. After years of intense fieldwork and study, Harvard sociologist and 2015 MacArthur “Genius” grant winner Matthew Desmond has come to believe that something fundamental is missing from that picture: how deeply housing is implicated in the creation of poverty.

Desmond says, “Not everyone living in a distressed neighborhood is associated with gang members, parole officers, employers, social workers, or pastors, but nearly all of them have a landlord.” The result of his research is the new book, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

  A feminist, an outspoken activist, a woman without a college education, Midge Costanza was one of the unlikeliest of White House insiders. Yet in 1977 she became the first female Assistant to the President for Public Liaison under Jimmy Carter, emerging as a prominent focal point of the American culture wars. Tasked with bringing the views of special interest groups to the president, Costanza championed progressive causes even as Americans grew increasingly divided on the very issues for which she fought. 

In A Feminist in the White House, Doreen Mattingly draws on Costanza's personal papers to shed light on the life of this fascinating and controversial woman.

  Many childhood summers, Mark Woods piled into a station wagon with his parents and two sisters and headed to America's national parks. Mark’s most vivid childhood memories are set against a backdrop of mountains, woods, and fireflies in places like Redwood, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national parks.

On the eve of turning fifty and a little burned-out, Mark decided to reconnect with the great outdoors. He'd spend a year visiting the national parks. He planned to take his mother to a park she'd not yet visited and to re-create his childhood trips with his wife and their iPad-generation daughter.

But then the unthinkable happened: his mother was diagnosed with cancer, given just months to live. Mark had initially intended to write a book about the future of the national parks, but Lassoing the Sun grew into something more: a book about family, the parks, the legacies we inherit and the ones we leave behind.

  Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and National Humanities Medalist Krista Tippett has interviewed the most extraordinary voices examining the great questions of meaning for our time. The heart of her work on her national public radio program and podcast, On Being, has been to shine a light on people whose insights kindle in us a sense of wonder and courage. 
 
In Becoming Wise, Tippett distills the insights she has gleaned from this luminous conversation in its many dimensions into a coherent narrative journey, over time and from mind to mind.

  Writer Jay McInerney became famous in the 1980s for Bright Lights, Big City, a semi-autobiographical novel about a young man coming of age in Manhattan, but his latest is more domestic in nature – focusing on the idea of a “perfect marriage.”

Bright, Precious Days is the third book in a trilogy about married couple Russell and Corrine Calloway. 

Maverick Concerts

Aug 16, 2016

Maverick Concerts, America’s oldest continuous summer chamber music festival and winner of the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, thrives on the love of great music and the spirit of its unique site in the unspoiled woods. The rustic 1916 concert hall is ideally suited to chamber music and the intimacy of live performance.

This is Maverick’s 101st season and we will hear about the remainder of their season including this weekend’s Chamber Orchestra Concert featuring the Maverick Concert Players. We welcome Maverick Concerts Music Director and Conductor, Alexander Platt.

The Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, NY is a non-profit wilderness school and community dedicated to mentoring children, youth, adults, and families in deep connection to nature, self, and others.

In September they are starting a program entitled: Awakening Wild: Nature Immersion for Adults. Awakening Wild will meet one weekend a month, September to May, and will offer an ongoing experience of fun, exciting nature immersion to awaken senses, bolster sense of comfort and confidence in the woods, and strengthen connection with the natural world.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss augmented and virtual reality. What are they and what is the difference? We will get into that in just a moment.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources.

Margaux Bergen began writing her new book when her daughter Charlotte turned nine and she gave it to her right after graduation from high school, when she was setting off for her first day of college.

In Navigating Life: Things I Wish My Mother Had Told Me, Bergen shares her own lessons learned in hopes that her trials and errors might benefit her daughter as she set off for college and prepares to navigate life for the first time on her own.

Margaux Bergen has spent the last twenty years raising three children and working all over the world at large and small institutions focused on international development and women’s leadership.

Mark Ouillette from The Book Loft in Great Barrington, MA joins us with this week's Book Picks list.

List:
Mr. Eternity by Aaron Thier
Pond by Claire-Louise Bennett
Ninety-Nine Stories of God by Joy Williams
Surrender, New York by Caleb Carr
Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrick

8/16/16 Panel

Aug 16, 2016

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

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