Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

Brexit - Steven Leibo

Jun 24, 2016
Steven Leibo
Steven Leibo

  Dr. Steven A. Leibo, the Sherman David Spector Professor in the Humanities at the Sage Colleges in New York, specializes in Modern International History & Politics.

He joins us to discuss the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union – or Brexit. 

Brexit - Tina Packer

Jun 24, 2016

  One of our favorite Brits, Tina Packer - founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA -  joins us to share her thoughts and feelings on the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union.

  Matthew Amroliwala is the host of Global with Matthew Amroliwala on BBC World News each weekday.

As BBC/US partners, WAMC reached out to their pressroom and Matthew agreed to join us today to talk about the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union – or Brexit. 

  Tim Vercellotti, political science professor and director of the Western New England University Polling Institute, is in London for a university summer program.

He has had a front row seat for the so-called “Brexit” referendum campaign.

Brexit - Hugh Johnson

Jun 24, 2016

  Nearly every market move over the last two weeks has been attributed to the British referendum on whether the United Kingdom should remain with or leave the European Union.

When a poll showed the British might want to leave? Stocks would go down. Then it looked like the U.K. would stay in the political and economic bloc and stocks would bounce up. Now that the U.K. has officially voted in favor of leaving, markets are going wild.

Investors around the world went into crisis mode as British voters chose to leave the European Union in a stunning decision with far-reaching implications. Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors in Albany, New York joins us live in Studio A to discuss the impact of the vote on the world and US economies.

6/24/16 Panel

Jun 24, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Finding Dory

Upcoming:
Michelle Shocked performs “Short Sharp Shocked”, plus Dryer - Putnam Den, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 6/23
Beware of a Holy Whore - Time + Space Limited, Hudson, Thursday-Friday, 6/23-24 (6:15 PM)
Troy Night Out - Downtown Troy, Friday 6/24, 5-9 PM
Miranda Lambert, plus Kip Moore, Brothers Osborn - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Friday 6/24
Chris Botti - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Friday 6/24
The Suitcase Junket - MASS MoCA, Saturday 6/25
Don Byron’s Junior Walker Tribute - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Saturday 6/25
Pretty Much the Best Comedy Show: Anthony DeVito - Underground at Proctors, Saturday 6/25
Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Saturday-Sunday, 6/25-26; Sat: Isley Brothers, Steps Ahead; Sun: Smokey Robinson, Chick Correa, Lizz Wright
A Very Intimate Evening with Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo - The Egg, Albany, Monday 6/27

New Movies: Independence Day: Resurgence, Dheepan, Free State of Jones,The Neon Demon

  At the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation. 

Julie M. Fenster is the author of many works of popular history, including The Case of Abraham Lincoln, Race of the Century, the award-winning Ether Day, and, with Douglas Brinkley, Parish Priest, which was a New York Times bestseller. She also co-wrote the PBS documentary First Freedom, about the founders and religious liberty. Her new book is Jefferson's America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation.

6/23/16 Panel

Jun 23, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Herbert Clark Hoover was the thirty-first President of the United States. He served one term, from 1929 to 1933. Often considered placid, passive, unsympathetic, and even paralyzed by national events, Hoover faced an uphill battle in the face of the Great Depression.

Many historians dismiss him as merely ineffective. But in Herbert Hoover in the White House,Charles Rappleye draws on rare and intimate sources—memoirs and diaries and thousands of documents kept by members of his cabinet and close advisors—to reveal a very different figure than the one often portrayed. The real Hoover, argues Rappleye, just lacked the tools of leadership.

  New England in the late nineteenth century was home to a set of high-spirited and ambitious writers who were, for the first time, creating a distinctly American literature. From this close-knit literary society emerged Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, who were known to be friends. In The Whale: A Love Story, novelist Mark Beauregard explores the boundaries of this friendship.

Through a nuanced reading of Melville’s real letters and other original sources, Beauregard offers the fictionalized story of two men who shared a deep, emotionally charged bond that may have transformed the writing—and meaning—of Moby-Dick. Scholars, academics, and essayists have written about Melville and Hawthorne’s relationship, trying to suss out what may have really happened between them.

  Annie Proulx is the author of ten books, including the novel, The Shipping News and the short story, Brokeback Mountain.

Her new novel, Barkskins, imagines the forging of a new world through humanity’s insatiable appetite for timber and through two families intertwined in the early onslaught of modern global deforestation.

  Her Again is an intimate look at the artistic coming-of-age of the greatest actress of her generation, from the homecoming float at her suburban New Jersey high school, through her early days on the stage at Vassar College and the Yale School of Drama during its golden years, to her star-making roles in The Deer Hunter, Manhattan, and Kramer vs. Kramer. 

New Yorker contributor Michael Schulman brings into focus Meryl’s heady rise to stardom on the New York stage; her passionate, tragically short-lived love affair with fellow actor John Cazale; her marriage to sculptor Don Gummer; and her evolution as a young woman of the 1970s wrestling with changing ideas of feminism, marriage, love, and sacrifice.

When our tech guru, Jesse Feiler is here – we talk quite a bit about Apple Technologies. This morning we are going to focus on news from Microsoft.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Brilliant Traces, by Cindy Lou Johnson is a roller-coaster of a play about feelings of isolation and people's need to be understood. Both comic and anguished, Brilliant Traces is set in a recluse's cabin in an Alaskan blizzard where a runaway bride seeks shelter.

Performing Arts of Woodstock is opening a production of the play at the Mescal Hornbeck Community Center this week.

The production is directed by Sande Shurin and stars Maria Elena Maurin as Rosannah. They join us along with President of Performing Arts of Woodstock, Adele Calcavecchio.

 

Today's Book Picks list comes from Rachel Person of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
They May Not Mean To, But They Do by Cathleen Schine
Be Frank With Me by Julia Claiborne Johnson
The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick
Cook Korean! A Comic Book with Recipes by Robin Ha (to be released 7/5)
Just My Luck by  Cammie McGovern
The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle
The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubraker Bradley

6/21/16 Panel

Jun 21, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond

WAMC Podcasts

Jun 20, 2016

  On-demand isn't all there is - but it is important. We're making sure that WAMC is on track in providing our radio content - and more - to you when and where you choose. 

Patrick Garrett and Ashleigh Kinsey join us to tell us more about WAMC Podcasts - which you can find on iTunes, Stitcher , and the Google Play store.

The Mount
David-Dashiell / edithwharton.org

  The Mount is a turn-of-the-century home, designed and built by Edith Wharton in 1902 in Lenox, MA. A National Historic Landmark, today The Mount is a cultural center that celebrates the intellectual, artistic and humanitarian legacy of Edith Wharton.

The Mount’s executive director, Susan Wissler, joins us now to tell us what they have coming up this summer. 

  The Boys in the Boat: The True Story of an American Team's Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics by Daniel James Brown tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

First released in 2013, the best-selling book has been released in a Young Readers Adaptation by Viking Books.

Berkshire Sculling Association in Pittsfield is hosting John Biglow, member of the 1984 Olympic rowing team. John has developed a talk around the The Boys in the Boat book, which he’ll be presenting at the Duffin Theater in Lenox on Sunday June 26 at 2:30.

  Now in his mid-seventies, Russell Banks has indulged his wanderlust for more than half a century.

In Voyager, Russell Banks, a lifelong explorer, shares highlights from his travels: interviewing Fidel Castro in Cuba; motoring to a hippie reunion with college friends in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; eloping to Edinburgh, with his fourth wife, Chase; driving a sunset orange metallic Hummer down Alaska’s Seward Highway.

Russell Banks will be at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs on Friday, June 24th.

6/20/16 Panel

Jun 20, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Fenimore Art Museum is currently filled with a wide-range of exciting exhibits featuring world-renowned artists such as Ansel Adams, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler among others.

The exhibitions include: Ansel Adams: Early Works (through September 18th), Traditions of Celebration and Ritual: The Thaw Collection of American Indian Art & A New York View: Country Landscapes by Robert Schneider (both through December 31st.) And Project 562: Portraits of Native America Now (through September 19th).

The summer season is highlighted by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec in Bohemian Paris (which includes La Boheme costumes from The Metropolitan Opera, through September 5th), The Perfection of Harmony: The Art of James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Featuring Lithographs from the Steven Block Collection at the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky (through October 2nd), Scott McKowen’s Shakespeare Illustrations (through – September 5th.)

Fenimore Art Museum curators Michelle Murdock and Chris Rossi join us this morning to tell us more.

  John Quincy Adams was the last of his kind—a Puritan from the age of the Founders who despised party and compromise, yet dedicated himself to politics and government. The son of John Adams, he was a brilliant ambassador and secretary of state, a frustrated president at a historic turning point in American politics, and a dedicated congressman who literally died in office—at the age of 80, in the House of Representatives, in the midst of an impassioned political debate.

In John Quincy Adams, scholar and journalist James Traub draws on Adams’ diary, letters, and writings to evoke a diplomat and president whose ideas remain with us today.

Havana
Mark Williamston / Getty Images

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the uncertainties facing Cuba’s young people in 2016, and about a public lecture happening next week in Charlemont, Massachusetts on Cuban immigration and on the recent rapprochement between the U.S. and Cuba.

Peter Purdy of the Charlemont Forum joins us this morning. Also here is Carlos Eire, the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of Religion and History at Yale University and the author of Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refugee Boy. Carlos will be speaking at The Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, June 22nd. The speech is entitled: “Migration, Resistance or Reform: Cuba’s Uncertain Future." 

6/17/16 Panel

Jun 17, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  There's a new beer in town! 

Bright Ideas Brewing is a new craft-brewery on the grounds of MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA and they are holding a grand opening celebration on June 19th from 2 to 7pm. It will feature an afternoon of live music featuring L.A. Americana Soul from Freddy & Francine and bluegrass from Burlington's Old Sky

We took a road-tript to Bright Ideas and spoke with Director of MASS MoCA, Joe Thompson; co-founders of Bright Ideas, Orion Howard and Eric Kerns; and brewer, Chris Post. 

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Me Before You, The Lobster

Upcoming:
Little River Band 40th Anniversary Tour - Proctors, Schenectady, Friday, June 17
Dolly Parton - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Friday, June 17
Doug Varone and Dancers (Castles, Strict Love, Lux) - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Saturday, June 18
Love Jones with Larenz Tate - Proctors, Schenectady, Saturday, June 18
The Remains of the Day with director James Ivory and Peter Biskind - Madison Theater, Albany, Saturday, June 18
Brian Wilson Pet Sounds with Al Jardine & Blondie Chaplin - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Sunday June 19 (2:30 PM)
Celtic Woman (The Destiny Tour) - Proctors, Schenectady, Sunday, June 19 (3 PM)
Dylan LeBlanc, The Pollies - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Sunday, June 19
Dead & Company feat. Bill Kreutzmann, John Mayer, Bob Weir - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Tuesday, June 21
Lucius, Margaret Glaspy - Upstate Concert Hall, Clifton Park, Wednesday, June 22

New movies: Finding Dory, Genius

6/16/16 Panel

Jun 16, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Williamstown Theatre Festival’s 2016 Season, the 62nd Season for the Tony Award-winning theatre company and second under Artistic Director Mandy Greenfield gets underway June 28th.   

The season runs through August 21st with a Main Stage lineup that includes: Tennessee Williams’ Tony Award-winning play The Rose Tattoo featuring Academy Award winner Marisa Tomei; the world premiere of Boo Killebrew’s comedy Romance Novels For Dummies and closes with the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winner Wendy Wasserstein’s An American Daughter.

The Nikos Stage season kicks-off June 29 with the world premiere of Cost of Living, directed by Obie Award winner Jo Bonney; and also includes the world premiere sci-fi comedy thriller The Chinese Room by Michael West; the world premiere musical Poster Boy and closes out the summer with the American premiere of And No More Shall We Part featuring Tony and Emmy Award nominee Alfred Molina and Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominee Jane Kaczmarek.

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