Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

Illustration by ALEXIS BEAUCLAIR
Alexis Beauclair

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities to learn about the practice and process of editorial illustration.

Alexandra Zsigmond is the art director of the New York Times Sunday Review, and we're going to speak with her about how politics and history are represented in editorial art. In addition to her work at the Times, Alexandra is one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ new Public Scholars.

  Tom Daschle and Trent Lott are two of the most prominent senators of recent time. Both served in their respective parties' leadership positions from the 1990s into the current century, and they have almost sixty years of service between them. Their congressional tenure saw the Reagan tax cuts, a deadlocked Senate, the Clinton impeachment, 9/11, and the Iraq War. Despite the tumultuous times, and despite their very real ideological differences, they have always maintained a positive working relationship, one almost unthinkable in today's hyper-partisan climate.

In their book, Crisis Point: Why We Must - and How We Can - Overcome Our Broken Politics in Washington and Across America, Daschle and Lott come together from opposite sides of the aisle to sound an alarm on the current polarization that has made governing all but impossible; never before has the people's faith in government been so dismally low. The senators itemize damaging forces--the permanent campaign, the unprecedented money, the 24/7 news cycle--and offer practical recommendations, pointing the way forward.

1/29/16 Panel

Jan 29, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Linda Fairstein was chief of the Sex Crimes Unit of the district attorney’s office in Manhattan for more than two decades and is America’s foremost legal expert on sexual assault and domestic violence. Her Alexandra Cooper novels are international bestsellers and have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

After publishing sixteen novels, Fairstein can still keep her legion of fans on the edge of their seats, offering rollercoaster plot twists and simmering emotional foreplay between her two main characters, NYPD Detective Mike Chapman and District Attorney Alexandra “Coop” Cooper.

She forwards the story in her new novel, Devil’s Bridge.

  In 2013, The New Black Fest in New York City commissioned six very diverse playwrights to write 10-minute plays on the topic of Trayvon Martin, race and/or privilege. This commission resulted in a collection of one-acts titled Facing our Truth which continue to be presented around the country, often around February 5th, Trayvon Martin’s birthday. Facing Our Truth's purpose is to spark serious discussion in our collective communities around these urgent issues.

Multicultural BRIDGE, WAM Theatre, Berkshire Theatre Group and Yvette “Jamuna” Sirker are joining together to present a reading of Facing Our Truth on Saturday, February 6 at 7:30PM at The Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, MA with a moderated panel and community discussion to follow.

Here to tell us more are Kristen van Ginhoven, Artistic Director of WAM Theatre, and Gwendolyn Hampton-VanSant, CEO and Founding Director of Multicultural BRIDGE.

  In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience—what we call neuroplasticity.

His new book, The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity ,shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works.

  Shawn Stone, formerly the Arts Editor of the late Metroland, returns to our show after a brief absence to tell us about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region. 

  As voting begins in a few days in the 2016 Presidential Campaign, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders may be the least political person in politics. But, he is leading Hillary Clinton in many polls. He’s closed the fundraising gap, and is drawing crowds of thousands to campaign rallies. Why?

With reporting from inside the campaign, personal relationships with Sanders’s friends and colleagues, and meticulous research, reporter Harry Jaffe offers a portrait of the ultimate outsider candidate, charting Sanders’s course from Brooklyn to Burlington, and now to Des Moines and beyond.

Harry Jaffe is a journalist covering Washington, DC—its politics, its crime, its heroes and villains. His new book is Why Bernie Sanders Matters.

1/28/16 Panel

Jan 28, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  This year’s Ice Harvest Festival at Hanford Mills Museum in East Meredith, NY is Saturday, February 6 from 10 am – 4 pm.

Using historic tools, children and adults can walk out on the frozen mill pond to cut and maneuver blocks of ice. The ice blocks are pushed up a ramp and then loaded onto sleds, which are hauled to a traditional ice house. Ice harvesting will take place all day, and visitors also can take part in a variety of indoor and outdoor activities.

Here to tell us more: Hanford Mills Museum’s executive director, Liz Callahan.

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