Joe Donahue

Senior Director of News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

The Northeast Filmmakers Lab is a non-competitive forum for filmmakers and movie goers seeking to interact with industry guests centered around character driven stories.  Past Film Talks and Screenings include films and filmmakers from the US, Europe, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Asia, as well, top regional filmmakers from Upstate New York. 

The Northeast Filmmakers Lab 4th Edition takes place all over the Capital Region – including The Linda WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio - November 9-12. Events include film talks, screenings, industry mixers, parties and more.

We are joined by Michael Camoin, founding director of Northeast Filmmakers Lab; filmmaker Susan Robbins who made the film “Lee’s 88 Keys” about Lee Shaw; and Allen Chou, President of Passion River Films.

11/8/17 Panel

Nov 8, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Community Engagement editor and Staff Reporter at the Berkshire Eagle Jenn Smith, and Communications Consultants Theresa Bourgeois.

Tyehimba Jess’ poetry serves as a bridge between “slam poetry” and other American verse traditions. His second collection Olio, which celebrates the unrecorded and largely unknown Black musicians and orators of the 19th and early 20th centuries, won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize.

He has dazzled audiences of theater, television and film for decades and has earned two Tony Awards, two Daytime Emmy Awards, a Screen Actors Guild Award, and numerous other accolades and nominations. The incomparable Nathan Lane will be live on stage for an evening of conversation and Q&A at Proctors on November 10th. 

The evening will begin with a showing of one of his most defining and hilarious films, "The Birdcage," followed by a live moderated discussion.

Alan Alda At Proctors

Nov 7, 2017

Alan Alda is an actor, director, screenwriter, author and seven-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award winner. He is widely known for playing Captain Hawkeye Pierce in the TV series "M*A*S*H," hosting "Scientific American Frontiers," and playing Arnold Vinick on "The West Wing."

A lifelong lover of science, Alda would like everyday people and science to shake hands. Just as he knew to get to a doctor, because of what his body was telling him, Alda believes that people should have an easier time understanding and relating to science. So aside from hosting PBS specials for over two decades, Alda has helped found the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, where scientists learn the communicative skills to help the world understand science better without all the jargon.

Alan Alda will be at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on Thursday, November 9 presenting a program entitled "Getting Beyond A Blind Date with Science."

"Smile! You're on Candid Camera!" Over eight different decades, nearly everyone who watches TV can happily relate to that phrase. Now Peter Funt, the show’s host, brings it to life in a show featuring clips, quips and great fun! “Candid Camera’s 8 Decades of Smiles! With Peter Funt,” is coming to the Wood Theater in Glens Falls, NY. The stage comedy is blended with a behind-the-scenes peek at the show’s funniest moments.

Created by Peter’s father, Allen Funt, "Candid Camera" is the only entertainment program to have produced new episodes in each of the last eight decades – from Allen’s start on TV in August, 1948, through Peter’s run on TV Land last year.

Using "Candid Camera’s" vast library, Peter showcases decades of fun and reveals what happened when the cameras weren’t rolling. Peter Funt joins us.

Glimmerglass Film Days

Nov 6, 2017

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City, a film about Jane Jacobs’ grassroots efforts to protect her neighborhood—New York City’s Greenwich Village—from car-centric, post-war development, kicks off the fifth annual Glimmerglass Film Days on Thursday at the Otesaga Hotel in Cooperstown.

Glimmerglass Films Days continues through November 13th with 18 feature length films, 9 shorts, filmmaker talks, receptions, guided walks, a companion art exhibit, and restaurant specials. The films, made in the United States as well as Mexico, the Netherlands, Mongolia, France, New Zealand, China, Turkey, and Italy, all reflect the theme “Home.”

Film Days curator Peggy Parsons, who also directs the Film Program at the National Gallery of Art, joins us for a preview.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on Butterfly Wings – an organization that provides non-food resources to families during times of financial insecurity. Christine J. Baxter, Director of Community Development, joins us.

11/6/17 Panel

Nov 6, 2017

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post, and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois.

Starting on Tuesday, November 7th, the National Geographic Channel will premiere The Long Road Home Based on the New York Times bestseller by ABC News Chief Global Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz, the eight-part mini-series tells the story of the ambush and the three heroic rescue missions launched to save the platoon.

It also focuses on the home front, as wives and mothers waited anxiously for word and drew support from one another.

Martha Raddatz joins us this morning to discuss the mini-series, which was filmed at Fort Hood. She also discusses the profound impact these American heroes have had on her life and why she wants everyone to know their story. 

In the summer of 2015, Scott Adams was in the middle of an unplanned career pivot from “guy who created the Dilbert comic” to a maverick political pundit. A week after Nate Silver put Trump’s odds at 2% in his FiveThirtyEight.com blog, Adams predicted on his own blog that Trump had a 98% chance of winning the presidency based on his persuasion skills.

Now Adams explains how he knew so early that Trump wasn’t simply a lucky clown. In his new book, WIN BIGLY: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter, Adams draws upon his background in hypnosis, persuasion and business to reveal the method in Trump's supposed madness, painting him as a “Master Persuader” who intentionally flipped the political narrative on its head.

Scott Adams is the creator of Dilbert, one of the most popular comic strips of all time. He has been a full-time cartoonist since 1995, after 16 years working in the technology realm at a major bank and later a phone company. His new book is: WIN BIGLY: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter. 

Could the makeup of the Supreme Court change again?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Starting tomorrow, the New York State Museum is opening an exhibition celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage in NY titled Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial. Monday - November 6th - is the 100th anniversary date of women’s suffrage in NY.

Votes for Women celebrates the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State and raise public awareness of the struggle for women’s suffrage and equal rights in New York State from the 1848 Seneca Falls Conven­tion through 1917 when New York State granted women the right to vote.

The exhibition also addresses the nationally significant role of New York State leaders in regards to women’s rights and the feminist movement through the early 21st century. 

The curators of the exhibition are Jennifer Lemak and Ashley Hopkins-Benton and they join us in studio.

11/3/17 Panel

Nov 3, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti and Corporate Attorney Rich Honen.

When Rich Cohen was eight years old, his father took him to see a Cubs game. On the way out of the park, his father asked him to make a promise. “Promise me you will never be a Cubs fan. The Cubs do not win,” he explained, “and because of that, a Cubs fan will have a diminished life determined by low expectations. That team will screw up your life.” As a result, Cohen became not just a Cubs fan but one of the biggest Cubs fans in the world. In this book, he captures the story of the team, its players and crazy days. It’s all here―not just what happened, but what it felt like and what it meant. He searches for the cause of the famous curse. Was it the billy goat, kicked out of Wrigley Field in Game 5 of the 1945 World Series, or does it go back further, to the very origins of the franchise?

Rich Cohen is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Tough Jews, The Avengers, Monsters, and (with Jerry Weintraub) When I Stop Talking, You’ll Know I’m Dead. He is a co-creator of the HBO series Vinyl and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and Rolling Stone and has written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and Harper’s Magazine, among others. His newest book is The Chicago Cubs: Story of a Curse.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Suburbicon

Upcoming: 
Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons
Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 11/2, 7 PM

1st Friday Albany: AIHA, Albany Barn, 3Fish Coffee, Esther Massry Gallery and many more . . .
Downtown Albany, Friday 11/3, 5-8 PM

Lewis Black: Rant, White & Blue
Palace Theatre, Albany, Friday 11/3, 8 PM

Thompson Square Duo
Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Friday 11/3, 8 PM

Holly Near, Brother Sun Sun and Guests
The Eighth Step at Proctors, Saturday 11/4, 7 PM

Jeffrey Biegel & Empire State Youth Orchestra: PDQ Bach NY Premiere
Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Saturday 11/4, 7:30 PM

Flogging Molly: Life Is Good Tour
Upstate Concert Hall, Clifton Park, Saturday 11/4, 8 PM

The Impressionist Line: From Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec
The Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Mass., opens Sunday 11/5 (through Jan. 7)

Lindsey Stirling: Warmer in the Winter
Palace Theatre, Albany, Wednesday 11/8, 8 PM

An Evening With King Crimson
The Egg, Albany, Wednesday-Thursday, 11/8-9, 8 PM

New movies: Goodbye Christopher Robin, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, Human Flow, Thor: Ragnarok, A Bad Moms Christmas

11/2/17 Panel

Nov 2, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Professor of Political Science at Siena College Vera Eccarius-Kelly, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois. 

Ron Chernow is the prizewinning author and the recipient of the 2015 National Humanities Medal. His first book, The House of Morgan, won the National Book Award, Washington: A Life won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography, and Alexander Hamilton (the inspiration for the Broadway musical) won the American History Book Prize.

His new book, Grant, provides a complete understanding of Ulysses S. Grant -- the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency.

Kate Shindle in Fun Home
Joan Marcus

The musical Fun Home has been called “groundbreaking,” “exquisite” and “unforgettable” - winning five 2015 Tony Awards including Best Musical and making history along the way. 

Based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir, Fun Home introduces us to Alison at three different ages as she explores and unravels the many mysteries of her childhood.

Kate Shindle is a former Miss America, the current President of Actor’s Equity and is now starring as Alison Bechdel in the touring production of Fun Home - now playing at Proctors through November 5th.

The current exhibition at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY is entitled A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America. It opened to the public Sunday, October 8, and runs through Sunday, December 31.

It features works of art from the respected collection of Barbara Gordon, one of the country’s prominent collectors of folk art. A Shared Legacy celebrates folk art traditions in rural areas of New England, the South, and the Midwest between 1800 and 1925. The exhibition is on a national tour that included stops at the American Folk Art Museum, Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Denver Art Museum, and Cincinnati Art Museum.

It includes more than sixty works, including paintings (still life, portrait, and landscape), sculpture, furniture, and decorative art. Much of the art was created by self-taught artists and artists, or those who had minimal formal training. 

The Hyde Collection’s Interim Director Anne Saile and head of Museum Education Jenny Hutchinson join us. 

11/1/17 Panel

Nov 1, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Community Engagement editor and Staff Reporter at the Berkshire Eagle Jenn Smith, Communications Consultants Theresa Bourgeois and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

Nancy Pearl has worked as a librarian and a bookseller for more than three decades, she is regularly featured on NPR’s Morning Edition talking about her favorite books.

The author of several works on non-fiction, she has now written her first novel, George & Lizzie, an emotional novel about an unlikely marriage as a crossroads.

The Chocolate Lab

Oct 31, 2017

Take one family's chocolate shop, add a dash of competition with the fancy new store on the block, stir in a candy-crazy Labrador named Cocoa...and you've got a recipe for disaster! If Mason and Hannah can win first prize at the annual Chocolate Expo, they may be able to save their parents' shop. But Cocoa can't control himself in the kitchen. And one more mess means they'll have to say goodbye to their pup for good!

Eric Luper is an author for young readers. In addition to two series with Scholastic Books called Key Hunters and The Chocolate Lab, Eric writes for Cartoon Network for shows including The Amazing World of Gumball, The Regular Show, and Teen Titans Go! He also has written titles for Scooby-Doo, Star Trek, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens. 

The first Empire State Youth Orchestra concert of the season on November 4 will make music history as the Youth Orchestra teams up with pianist Jeffrey Biegel at Troy Savings Bank Music Hall to perform the New York State Premiere of a recent composition from legendary musical satirist P.D.Q. Bach. The evening will also include Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor and Prokovfiev's Symphony No. 5. 

Helen Cha-Pyo is the Conductor and Music Director of the Empire State Youth Orchestra joined us on the program. 

Today's Book Picks list comes from Laura Knapp of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty

You Don't Have to Say You Love Me by Sherman Alexie

The ACB with Honora Lee by Kate De Goldi

Still Stuck by Shinsuke Yoshitake

The Unlikely Story of a Pig in the City by Jodi Kendall

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

Role Models by John Waters

Pug & Pig Trick-or-Treat by Sue Lowell Gallion

By 2025, Americans will likely be donating over half a trillion dollars annually to nonprofit organizations. Those philanthropic gifts will transform significant parts of America's civic sector landscape.

Philanthropy is entering an era of unprecedented growth and innovation. Established foundations such as Ford and Rockefeller are doubling down on programs tackling long-simmering problems, including global inequality, less-than-stellar education, and uneven access to health care. Many foundations are engaging in advocacy on controversial issues, exploring venture philanthropy solutions, and experimenting with impact investing. And philanthropists such as Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, New York's high-profile financiers, and Silicon Valley's billionaires are planning to put their wealth to work as never before: Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan recently pledged to donate 99 percent of their Facebook shares during their lifetimes, and nearly 150 others have signed the Giving Pledge to increase dramatically their "giving while living."

In Putting Wealth to Work, Joel L. Fleishman provides expert analysis of contemporary philanthropy, offering invaluable insight for those engaging with and affected by charitable foundations. This is the fascinating and definitive account of philanthropy today, and an indispensable guide to understanding its inner workings, impact, and expansive potential.

10/31/17 Panel

Oct 31, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

CiderDays is an annual community celebration of all things apple in beautiful Franklin County, Massachusetts. 2017 marks their 23rd year with tours, cidermaking and tastings, workshops and much more in orchards and venues county-wide from Ashfield, Deerfield, Turners Falls, Charlemont and Colrain to New Salem and the towns in between.

Whether you are a cider aficianado (hard or sweet), make your own cider, are an orchardist, like hanging out in bucolic orchards, or just enjoy soaking up all the goodness of autumn in New England, CiderDays is a pretty cool event. To find out more – we welcome Al Sax from the CiderDays committee and home hard cider maker, April Woodard.

Breaking the Code, a play by Hugh Whitemore tells the story of computer genius Alan Turing. The play is being staged by Performing Arts of Woodstock for a three-week run beginning November 3rd.

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing saved the Allies from the Nazis and invented the computer and artificial intelligence - all before his suicide at age forty-one.  Breaking The Code tells how Turing's revolutionary ideas laid the foundation for the modern computer, and how he took a leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during WW II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory.  

This is also the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was arrested and forced to undergo cruel and humiliating chemical castration -- all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a criminal office -- gross indecency.

The play is directed by Bette Siler and Wallace Norman and they join us.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Albany Damien Center which is opening their new 26,000 square foot building at 728 Madison Ave, Albany. They will also have a fundraiser on November 4: Norman Rea Presents A Phoenix Rising A Capital Celebration of the new Damien Center. Perry Junjulas is the Executive Director of The Albany Damien Center.

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