Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu January 10, 2013

"Back to School" by Mike Rose

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education is the first book to look at the schools that serve a growing population of “second-chancers,” exploring what higher education—in the fullest sense of the term—can offer our rapidly changing society.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu January 10, 2013

Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer's Guide to the Uses of Religion

We welcome Alain de Botton and speak with him about his book, Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer's Guide to the Uses of Religion.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu January 10, 2013

The Willpower Instinct by Dr. Kelly McGonigal

As an award-winning psychology instructor at Stanford University, as well as a health educator for the School of Medicine’s Health Improvement Program, Dr. Kelly McGonigal’s job is to help people manage stress and make positive changes in their lives. After years of watching people try to control their bodies, emotions, and choices, she realized that much of what they believed about willpower was sabotaging their success and creating unnecessary stress.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Thu January 10, 2013

"Kinsey and Me: Stories" by Sue Grafton

In 1982 years ago, Sue Grafton introduced us to Kinsey Millhone - the main character in her best-selling alphabet mystery series. In her new book, Kinsey and Me: Stories Grafton gives readers stories that reveal Kinsey’s origins and Sue’s past.

Arts & Culture
11:35 am
Wed January 9, 2013

A Ship Without A Sail: The Life of Lorenz Hart

Lyricist, Lorenz Hart, together with composer Richard Rodgers, wrote some of the most memorable songs ever created. Gary Marmorstein’s new book, A Ship Without A Sail: The Life of Lorenz Hart is a revelatory biography that includes many of the lyrics that define Hart’s legacy.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed January 9, 2013

"Nature Wars" by Jim Sterba

Journalist Jim Sterba joins us to discuss Nature Wars: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds. Sterba says, believe it or not, it is very likely that more people live in closer proximity to more wild animals, birds and trees in the eastern United States today than anywhere on the planet at any time in history. But, is that a good thing?

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed January 9, 2013

"The Network" by Lincoln Schatz

In The Network: Portrait Conversations, artist Lincoln Schatz offers a unique portrayal of contemporary American leadership and innovation. Representing government, business, science, technology, and culture, Schatz’ eighty-nine subjects include father of the Internet Vint Cerf, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, Emmy Award-winning journalist Cokie Roberts, Republican strategist Karl Rove, and liberal heavyweight Vernon Jordan.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed January 9, 2013

"From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights"

Albany Law School President and Dean Penelope Andrews is the author of the new book From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights, which advances a new approach to pursuing human rights for women in developing democracies.

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Arts & Culture
9:35 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Yo-Yo Ma plays with the ASO on 1/12

The legendary cellist, Yo-Yo Ma, will join the Albany Symphony Orchestra on Saturday night in a special one-night event at the Palace Theater. Ma will perform the Dvorak Cello Concerto. The performance will also include "Elegy" by John Williams.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue January 8, 2013

"The Eve of Destruction: How 1965 Transformed America"

At the beginning of 1965, the U.S. seemed on the cusp of a golden age. Although Americans had been shocked by the assassination in 1963 of President Kennedy, they exuded a sense of consensus and optimism that showed no signs of abating. Indeed, political liberalism and interracial civil rights activism made it appear as if 1965 would find America more progressive and unified than it had ever been before. In January 1965, President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed that the country had “no irreconcilable conflicts.”

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