Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

James Lasdun At NYSWI

Nov 15, 2016

It is summer, 2012. Charlie, a wealthy banker with an uneasy conscience, invites his troubled cousin Matthew to visit him and his wife in their idyllic mountaintop house. As the days grow hotter, the friendship between the three begins to reveal its fault lines, and with the arrival of a fourth character, the household finds itself suddenly in the grip of uncontrollable passions. As readers of James Lasdun’s acclaimed fiction can expect, The Fall Guy is a complex moral tale as well as a gripping suspense story, probing questions of guilt and betrayal with ruthless incisiveness.

James Lasdun and Charles Baxter will participate in two events presented by The New York State Writers Institute today.

The Berkshire Concert Choir was formed in 1977 with the merger of the Stockbridge Singers, Inc. and The Cantata Choir of South Congregational Church of Pittsfield. The Choir is a membership organization open to all who enjoy singing and are willing to devote one evening a week to rehearsals.

The Choir presents Carl Orff's cantata, Carmina Burana, on Saturday, November 19 at 7:30 pm in the Boland Theater at Berkshire Community College, 1350 West Street, Pittsfield. 

To tell us more, we welcome Paula Nuss, Artistic Director, Marilyn Gerhard, tenor and President of the choir, and Francis Stone, bass and board member.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss social media in the news and as the news.  

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. 

   This week's Book Picks come to us from Joan Grenier at The Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA.

List:
Words in Transit: Stories of Immigrants edited by Ilan Stavans
Shakespeare and Company: A History of the Rag & Bone Shop of the Heart edited by Krista Halverson
Footnotes from the World’s Greatest Bookstores by Bob Eckstein, Foreword by Garrison Keillor
Dancers after Dark by Jordan Matter
Palestine on a Plate: Memories from My Mother’s Kitchen by Joudie Kalla
Truevine: Two Brothers, a Kidnapping, and a Mother’s Quest: A True Story of the Jim Crow South by Beth Macy
Our Revolution by Bernie Sanders

11/15/16 Panel

Nov 15, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and Corporate Attorney Rich Honen.

From the fictional towns of Hill Valley, CA, and Shermer, IL, to the beautiful landscapes of the “Goondocks” in Astoria and the “time of your life” dirty dancing resort still alive and well in Lake Lure, NC, '80s teen movies left their mark not just on movie screen and in the hearts of fans, but on the landscape of America itself.

Like few other eras in movie history, the '80s teen movies has endured and gotten better with time. In Brat Pack America, Kevin Smokler gives virtual tours of your favorite movies while also picking apart why these locations are so important to these movies.

After traveling across three continents to stalk the modern story of butter, award-winning food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova tells a story as rich, textured, and culturally relevant as butter itself. Her new book is Butter: A Rich History.

From its humble agrarian origins to its present-day artisanal glory, butter has a fascinating story to tell, and Khosrova is the perfect person to tell it. With tales about the ancient butter bogs of Ireland, the pleasure dairies of France, and the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Khosrova details butter’s role in history, politics, economics, nutrition, and even spirituality and art.

Ray Kroc was peddling franchises around the country for a fledgling hamburger stand in the 1950s - McDonald’s, it was called - when he entered a St. Paul supper club and encountered a beautiful young piano player named Joan who would change his life forever.

Just as their relationship twisted and turned dramatically, the fortunes of Ray’s new business came perilously close to failure.  Ultimately Ray wrested control of McDonald’s from the original founders; in short order the successful burger stand in the desert of California would be transformed into a stock market sensation and international brand.

To the outside world, Ray and Joan were happy, enormously rich, and giving. But privately, Joan was growing troubled over Ray’s temper and dark secret, something she was reluctant to publicly reveal. And yet, this volatility paved the way for Joan’s transformation into one of the greatest philanthropists of our time.

Journalist Lisa Napoli’s new book is: Ray & Joan: The Man Who Made the McDonald's Fortune and the Woman Who Gave It All Away. 

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we will learn about Troy Area United Ministries which has various programs to serve those in need, including a Furniture Program, Troy Damien Center, MLK Scholarships, and Computers for Kids.

Rev. Donna Elia, Executive Director of Troy Area United Ministries joins us. 

If you, or someone you know has furniture available to donate, please call at 274.5920 x204.

11/14/16 Panel

Nov 14, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

Before the rise of basic cable, Saturday mornings for many children in America were spent watching cartoons on one of three available television channels. From 1958 through the 1980s, a majority of those cartoons bore the Hanna-Barbera imprint. Creating scores of popular series such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, Scooby-Doo, Super Friends, and The Smurfs, Hanna-Barbera was an animation powerhouse.

Hanna-Barbera: The Architects of Saturday Morning is the first museum exhibition on the world’s most successful animation partnership. It opens tomorrow at the Norman Rockwell Museum and runs through May 29th.

Fair trade is an approach to business and to development based on dialogue, transparency, and respect that seeks to create greater equity in the international trading system. Fair trade supports farmers and craftspeople in developing countries who are socially and economically marginalized. These producers often face steep hurdles in finding markets and customers for their goods. Fair trade ensures fair wages, care for the environment and respect for cultural identity. 

Mayan Hands in Albany and Mango Tree Imports in Saratoga Springs are teaming up with local places of worship over this holiday season to present Fair Trade options for gift buying. Here to tell us more are Kim Andersen from Mango Tree Imports, Brenda Rosenbaum from Mayan Hands, and Carol Smith from B'nai Shalom, the venue for our first marketplace on Sunday Nov 13. 

Dates and locations for the Holiday Season Fair Trade Markets available here

Every sports fan recalls with amazing accuracy a pivotal winning moment involving a favorite team or player - yet lost are the stories on the other side of these history-making moments, the athletes who experienced not transcendent glory but crushing disappointment: the cornerback who missed the tackle on the big touchdown; the relief pitcher who lost the series; the world-record holding Olympian who fell on the ice.

In Losing Isn’t Everything, sportscaster Curt Menefee (joined by bestselling writer Michael Arkush) examines a range of signature "disappointments" from the wide world of sports, interviewing the subject at the heart of each loss and uncovering what it means—months, years, or decades later—to be associated with failure. 

11/11/16 Panel

Nov 11, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and author and activist Barbara Smith. 

Joe Conason is editor-in-chief of The National Memo and an editor at The Investigative Fund. A widely published columnist and reporter, he is the author of several books, including Big Lies, and co-author of the New York Times bestseller The Hunting of the President: The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton.

His new book is Man of the World: The Further Endeavors of Bill Clinton, where Conason profiled Bill Clinton’s post presidency career in philanthropy.

A live reading, Suicide Imprint, will be presented at the Rosendale Theatre on November 15th as part of the New Work Forum series (in which audience members receive free admission in exchange for their feedback). The reading is by seven women who participated in a writing workshop for suicide survivors (people who had lost someone they loved to suicide) and individuals who had attempted suicide.

Next Tuesday night the group will come together to transform a fearful, taboo subject into knowledge and life experience that can be shared and understood. The first-person accounts they present are a moving testimony to what it is to lose a loved one, or to almost lose oneself.

We welcome Maureen Cummins, a visual artist and writer whose current work, including her book-in-progress, explores the gendered history of “mental health” in America; Beverly Donofrio, the author of Riding in Cars with Boys, Looking for Mary, and Astonished; and Denise Ranaghan who has been working in the mental health field for 16 years. She is the director of Wellness Services at Mental Health Association in Ulster county and is the author of Institutional Eyes; A Childhood Revisited in the Military.

Ralph Nader knows a thing or two about running for President of the United States.

Named by The Atlantic as one of the hundred most influential figures in American history, and by Time and Life magazines as one of the most influential Americans of the twentieth century, Ralph Nader has helped us drive safer cars, eat healthier food, breathe better air, drink cleaner water, and work in safer environments for more than four decades.

In his new book, Breaking Through Power, Ralph Nader draws from a lifetime waging--and often winning--David vs. Goliath battles against big corporations and the United States government. He highlights the success stories of fellow Americans who organize change and work together to derail the many ways in which wealth manipulates politics, labor, media, the environment, and the quality of national life today.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt (launching 11/15), joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

11/10/16 Panel

Nov 10, 2016

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld.

11/9/16 Panel

Nov 9, 2016

Today's Roundtable Panel took place before a live studio audience at The Linda WAMC's Performing Arts Studio in downtown Albany.

Today's panelists: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany, Rosemary Armao, Political Consultant Libby Post, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, author and activist Barbara Smith and Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill. 

Jonathan Safran Foer is the author of Everything Is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. His latest novel, Here I Am, is set in present-day Washington, D.C., where a Jewish family goes through a domestic crisis, while at the same time, a geopolitical crisis unfolds on the other side of the world.

The 6th annual Made in the Berkshires festival features cutting-edge theatrical works performed as staged readings, live music, film, short stories and dance in a festival atmosphere like no other. New and innovative pieces as well as established work will be presented by local Berkshire County playwrights, actors, directors, musicians and performers.

Featured as performance blocks, Made in the Berkshires will allow audiences to enjoy the breadth and depth of the artistic talent that has landed in Berkshire County while celebrating the best in the visual and performing arts.

Professional artists and artists-in-the-making gather to share their talent with the Berkshire community. The festival will once again be curated by Hilary Somers Deely and Barbara Sims; two local artists who have helped create the rich cultural tapestry that permeates the Berkshires.

We are joined by Hilary and Barbara as well as Berkshire Theatre Group’s Artistic Director and CEO Kate Maguire.

   Dianne Ortmann and Carrie Knudsen from Chatham Bookstore in Chatham, NY join us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
Art of Movement by Ken Browar and Deborah Ory
Being a Dog by Alexandra Horowitz
Gamechangers: The Unsung Heroines of Sports History by Molly Schiot
The Guiniveres by Sarah Domet
Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro
Steve McCurry: On Reading by Steve McCurry
The Trespasser by Tana French
Real Cowboys by Kate Hoefler, illustrated by Jonathan Bean
Some Writer: The Story of E.B. White by Melissa Sweet

The Tang Teaching Museum on the campus of Skidmore College in Saratoga will be having an Election Night Extravaganza - a full evening of dialogue, activities, and refreshments with live coverage of the voting results. 

The event is co-sponsored by Skidmore College clubs Democracy Matters, College Republicans, and College Democrats. This event is part of the exhibition A More Perfect Union and is free and open to the public which runs from 7 pm to midnight.

To tell us more – we welcome Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College, and curator of A More Perfect Union. Minita Sanghvi, an assistant professor in Management and Business at Skidmore College who specializes in political marketing and issues of gender and power. And Ron Seyb is here, an associate professor of political science, who specializes in the American presidency, the U.S. Congress, political psychology, and the media and politics.

11/8/16 Panel

Nov 8, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao.

After sitting at the feet of Martin Luther King at the University of Michigan in 1963, Larry Brilliant was swept up into the civil rights movement, marching and protesting across America and Europe. As a radical young doctor he followed the hippie trail from London over the Khyber Pass with his wife Girija, Wavy Gravy and the Hog Farm commune to India. There, he found himself in a Himalayan ashram wondering whether he had stumbled into a cult. Instead, one of India’s greatest spiritual teachers, Neem Karoli Baba, opened Larry’s heart and told him his destiny was to work for the World Health Organization to help eradicate killer smallpox. He would never have believed he would become a key player in eliminating a 10,000-year-old disease that killed more than half a billion people in the 20th century alone.

He's led a Forrest Gumpian life and his story is recounted in his new book, Sometimes Brilliant: The Impossible Adventure of a Spiritual Seeker and Visionary Physician Who Helped Conquer the Worst Disease in History.

Glimmerglass Film Days

Nov 7, 2016

The fourth annual Glimmerglass Film Days will be held in Cooperstown on November 10th -14th. Peggy Parsons is the Film Days curator and founder and she is also the founder and director of the film program at the National Gallery of Art.

Glimmerglass Film Days explores the concept of resilience in natural and man-made worlds. Films uncover preserving Japanese sake traditions, tenacity of Babushkas in Chernobyl, deep links between African Americans and their ancestral pasts, and the founding of Greenpeace.

The festival also has us travel to South America in search of lost shamans, drugs, and cultures, and examine many other struggles closer to home. 

11/7/16 Panel

Nov 7, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

When Hungarian professor Ernő Rubik invented the Rubik’s Cube (or, rather, his Cube) in the 1970s out of wooden blocks, rubber bands, and paper clips, he didn’t even know if it could be solved, let alone that it would become the world’s most popular puzzle. Since its creation, the Cube has become many things to many people: one of the bestselling children’s toys of all time, a symbol of intellectual prowess, a frustrating puzzle with 43.2 quintillion possible permutations, and now a worldwide sporting phenomenon that is introducing the classic brainteaser to a new generation.

In Cracking the Cube, Ian Scheffler reveals that cubing isn’t just fun and games. Along with participating in speedcubing competitions—from the World Championship to local tournaments—and interviewing key figures from the Cube’s history, he journeys to Budapest to seek a meeting with the legendary and notoriously reclusive Rubik, who is still tinkering away with puzzles in his seventies.

Chuck Collins grew up in the 1 percent as the great grandson of meatpacker Oscar Mayer, but at age 26 he gave away his inheritance.

He has been working to reduce inequality and strengthen communities since 1982. His new book is Born on Third Base: A One Percenter Makes the Case for Tackling Inequality, Bringing Wealth Home, and Committing to the Common Good.

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