Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

  Andy Lazris, MD, is a practicing primary care physician who experiences the effects of Medicare policy on a daily basis. As a result, he believes that the way we care for our elderly has taken a wrong turn and that Medicare is complicit in creating the very problems it seeks to solve. Aging is not a disease to be cured; it is a life stage to be lived

His new book is Curing Medicare: A Doctor's View on How Our Health Care System Is Failing Older Americans and How We Can Fix It.

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY is celebrating its 35th anniversary and has many exciting and educational events going on this season including: artist demonstrations, a fall exhibition, A Soldier's Heart a Sister's Hands: Haudenosaune [ho deh neh show nee] Women Veterans, Iroquois storytelling and the Iroquois Festival on Labor Day weekend.

They will be hosting a party on July 9th to celebrate 35 years with vendors, live music, children's activities, silent auction and more. 

Here to tell us more are Dr. Christina Hanks, Founding Director of the museum and Stephanie Shultes, Current Director.

This week's Book Picks from Amy Lane at The Open Door Bookstore and Gift Gallery in Schenectady, NY.

List:
All Things Cease to Appear by Elizabeth Brundage
The Only Rule Is It Has to Work by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller
Free Days with George by Colin Campbell
How to Set a Fire and Why by Jesse Ball
The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu by Joshua Hammer
A Child's First Book of Trump written by Michael Ian Black, Illustrated by Marc Rosenthal

7/5/2016 Panel

Jul 5, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Ron Kovic
Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

  Ron Kovic was really born on the 4th of July. Forty years ago the Vietnam vet — wounded in combat and in a wheelchair ever since — published his classic war memoir, later made into a film with Tom Cruise – Born on the Fourth of July. The new anniversary edition features a foreword by Bruce Springsteen.

In addition, Kovic - who continues his activism -  has written a new memoir entitled Hurricane Street, which chronicles the 1970s activism of the American Veterans Movement.

7/1/16 Panel

Jul 1, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Shadowland Stages in Ellenville, NY began this summer season with John Cariani’s Last Gas. The are currently presenting the Hudson Valley premiere of John Logan’s RED – and the season to come includes Miracle on South Division St., 8-Track: Songs of the 70’s, and God of Carnage all of that and the Acting Academy at the Shadowland Stages is entering its ninth year.

Brendan Burke is the Artistic Director at the Shadowland Stages and he joins us. 

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Free State of Jones

Upcoming:
Twyla Tharp Dance - (Country Dances, Brahms Paganini, premiere of Beethoven Op. 130/String Quartet No. 13) - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 6/30
Tom Russell - Eighth Step at Proctors, Schenectady, Thursday 6/30
1st Friday - (Albany Institute of History & Art, Upstate Artists Guild, Romaine Brooks Gallery etc.) Downtown Albany, Friday 7/1 (5-9 PM)
Upbeat on the Roof with Olivia Quillio - Tang Teaching Museum & Art Gallery, Saratoga Springs, Friday 7/1
Simi Stone - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Friday 7/1
Bob Dylan, Mavis Staples - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Saturday 7/2
Chicago - Park Playhouse - July 1-30 - Tuesday through Saturday at 8pm
Jupiter String Quartet with pianist Ilya Yakushev (music of Beethoven, Ligeti, Schubert, Shostakovich) Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock, Sunday 7/3 (4 PM)
James Taylor - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Monday 7/4
New York State’s 4th of July at the Plaza - Empire State Plaza, Albany, Monday 7/4 (event starts at 3 PM; Boogie Wonder Band at 8 PM; fireworks at 9:15 PM)
Summer in the City free movies present Wreck-It Ralph - Palace Theatre, Albany, Tuesday 7/5 (noon)

New movies: Our Kind of Traitor, Les Cowboys, The BFG, The Legend of Tarzan

  Novelist and Williams College Professor Alison Case joins us this morning to discuss her reimagining of Wuthering Heights. The new book is Nelly Dean: A Return to Wuthering Heights - a gripping and heartbreaking novel that re-imagines life at Wuthering Heights through the eyes of the Earnshaws’ loyal servant, Nelly Dean.

Nelly Dean is an inspired accompaniment to Emily Bronte’s adored work. It is the story of a woman who is fated to bear the pain of a family she is unable to leave, and unable to save.

6/30/16 Panel

Jun 30, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Scott Woolley's new book, The Network: The Battle for the Airwaves and the Birth of the Communications Age is the origin story of the airwaves - the foundational technology of the communications age - as told through the forty-year friendship of an entrepreneurial industrialist and a brilliant inventor.

  He is one of the most prolific writers ever with 156 published books that have sold more than 325 million copies worldwide.

James Patterson is on a mission to get even more people to read in this digital age. He is introducing BookShots-- a new line of short and propulsive.

  Colm Tóibín is one of Ireland’s foremost living novelists and journalists. His most recent novel is Nora Webster, which the Los Angeles Times said “may actually be a perfect work of fiction.”

He also wrote the novel, Brooklyn, which was made into a successful film nominated this year for an Oscar for Best Picture. 

  Feminism has hit the big time. Once a dirty word brushed away with a grimace, “feminist” has been rebranded as a shiny label sported by movie and pop stars, fashion designers, and multi-hyphenate powerhouses like Beyoncé. It drives advertising and marketing campaigns for everything from wireless plans to underwear to perfume, presenting what’s long been a movement for social justice as just another consumer choice in a vast market. Individual self-actualization is the goal, shopping more often than not the means, and celebrities the mouthpieces.

But what does it mean when social change becomes a brand identity? Feminism’s splashy arrival at the center of today’s media and pop-culture marketplace, after all, hasn’t offered solutions to the movement’s unfinished business.

Andi Zeisler, a founding editor of Bitch Media, draws on more than twenty years’ experience interpreting popular culture in this biting history of how feminism has been co-opted, watered down, and turned into a gyratory media trend in her new book, We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrrl to CoverGirl®, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement.

Barrington Stage Company’s second St. Germain stage production of this season is Kimberly Akimbo by Pulitzer Prize winner, David Lindsay-Abaire.

Starring Debra Jo Rupp and set in the wilds of suburban New Jersey, Kimberly Akimbo is a hilarious and heartrending play about a teenager with a rare condition causing her body to age faster than normal.

When she and her family flee Secaucus under dubious circumstances, Kimberly is forced to reevaluate her life while contending with a hypochondriac mother, a rarely sober father, a scam-artist aunt, her own mortality and, most terrifying of all, the possibility of first love.

Debra Jo Rupp was last seen at Barrington Stage in Dr. Ruth: All the Way and will return to the St. Germain stage later this season to perform in Love Letters with Mark H. Dold. 

Jacqueline Kellachan from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
The Girls: A Novel by Emma Cline
SweetBitter: A Novel by Stephanie
The Second Life of Nick Mason by Steve Hamilton
Joe Gould's Teeth by Jill Lepore
Robert Winthrop Chanler: Discovering The Fantastic edited by Vizcaya Museum and Garden/The Monacelli Press

Events:
"By The Book"with Marshall Karp, Joe Donohue and James Conrad - June 29, 7PM
The Mommy Group by Elizabeth Isadora Gold - July 2, 4PM
Sex Object by Jessica Valenti - July 3, 3PM

6/28/2016

Jun 28, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

We have probably all seen the movies, TV shows and books which tell the story about lawman Wyatt Earp. But, very few make mention of his wife. Married for nearly 50 years, Josephine Sarah Marcus Earp was beautiful, gusty and Jewish.

Thelma Adams has delved into the life and times of Mrs. Wyatt with her new novel, The Last Woman Standing. At once an epic account of an improbable romance and a retelling of an iconic American tale, The Last Woman Standing recalls the famed gunfight at the O.K. Corral through the eyes of Josephine.

For over two decades, she has penned celebrity features and criticism for high-profile publications. While covering film for the New York Post, Us Weekly, and Yahoo Movies, Thelma Adams became a regular at film festivals from Berlin to Dubai, Toronto to Tribeca. Her debut novel was Playdate and it is always a pleasure to welcome Thelma back to The Roundtable.

  In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing.

In The Man Who Invented Fiction William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

The goal of the all-volunteer Reading Is Fun Program (RIF) in Schenectady, NY is to keep helping Schenectady's needy 4-9 year olds in pre-K, Kindergarten, and Grades 1-3, to learn reading-readiness and conversational skills and vocabulary.  

We are joined by Founder and Executive Director Alvin Magid and Chief Operating Officer Mary Lou Russo.

Over the past three years, American writer Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to and living in the West Bank, staying with Palestinian families in its largest cities and its smallest villages. Eventually Ehrenreich moved to Ramallah, and started writing what would become his new book: The Way To The Spring: Life and Death in Palestine.

Ehrenreich was moved by the injustices that he witnessed, and by the general silence about them in most U.S. media. As well informed as he was on the Arab-Israeli conflict, he nonetheless was consistently shocked by what he saw, and by how little the vast majority of people in the U.S. (and even in Israel, just few miles away) understood about the lived realities of the occupation. He felt strongly that he wanted to write to break through those silences.

In cities and small villages alike, men and women, young and old, shared their lives with Ehrenreich and made their own case for resistance and resilience in the face of life under occupation. The Way to the Spring makes clear that conditions on the ground are changing--and getting worse.

6/27/16 Panel

Jun 27, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Brexit - Steven Leibo

Jun 24, 2016
Steven Leibo
Steven Leibo

  Dr. Steven A. Leibo, the Sherman David Spector Professor in the Humanities at the Sage Colleges in New York, specializes in Modern International History & Politics.

He joins us to discuss the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union – or Brexit. 

Brexit - Tina Packer

Jun 24, 2016

  One of our favorite Brits, Tina Packer - founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA -  joins us to share her thoughts and feelings on the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union.

  Matthew Amroliwala is the host of Global with Matthew Amroliwala on BBC World News each weekday.

As BBC/US partners, WAMC reached out to their pressroom and Matthew agreed to join us today to talk about the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union – or Brexit. 

  Tim Vercellotti, political science professor and director of the Western New England University Polling Institute, is in London for a university summer program.

He has had a front row seat for the so-called “Brexit” referendum campaign.

Brexit - Hugh Johnson

Jun 24, 2016

  Nearly every market move over the last two weeks has been attributed to the British referendum on whether the United Kingdom should remain with or leave the European Union.

When a poll showed the British might want to leave? Stocks would go down. Then it looked like the U.K. would stay in the political and economic bloc and stocks would bounce up. Now that the U.K. has officially voted in favor of leaving, markets are going wild.

Investors around the world went into crisis mode as British voters chose to leave the European Union in a stunning decision with far-reaching implications. Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors in Albany, New York joins us live in Studio A to discuss the impact of the vote on the world and US economies.

6/24/16 Panel

Jun 24, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Finding Dory

Upcoming:
Michelle Shocked performs “Short Sharp Shocked”, plus Dryer - Putnam Den, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 6/23
Beware of a Holy Whore - Time + Space Limited, Hudson, Thursday-Friday, 6/23-24 (6:15 PM)
Troy Night Out - Downtown Troy, Friday 6/24, 5-9 PM
Miranda Lambert, plus Kip Moore, Brothers Osborn - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Friday 6/24
Chris Botti - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Friday 6/24
The Suitcase Junket - MASS MoCA, Saturday 6/25
Don Byron’s Junior Walker Tribute - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Saturday 6/25
Pretty Much the Best Comedy Show: Anthony DeVito - Underground at Proctors, Saturday 6/25
Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Saturday-Sunday, 6/25-26; Sat: Isley Brothers, Steps Ahead; Sun: Smokey Robinson, Chick Correa, Lizz Wright
A Very Intimate Evening with Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo - The Egg, Albany, Monday 6/27

New Movies: Independence Day: Resurgence, Dheepan, Free State of Jones,The Neon Demon

  At the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation. 

Julie M. Fenster is the author of many works of popular history, including The Case of Abraham Lincoln, Race of the Century, the award-winning Ether Day, and, with Douglas Brinkley, Parish Priest, which was a New York Times bestseller. She also co-wrote the PBS documentary First Freedom, about the founders and religious liberty. Her new book is Jefferson's America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation.

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