Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

Kaitlyn Davidson
Credit: Robert Mannis

  Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella is the Tony Award-winning musical from the creators of South Pacific and The Sound of Music that's delighting audiences with its surprisingly contemporary take on the classic tale. This lush production features an incredible orchestra, jaw-dropping transformations and all the moments you love—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more. The show is at Proctors in Schenectady, NY this week.

The show boasts Rodgers and Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including "In My Own Little Corner," "Impossible/It's Possible" and "Ten Minutes Ago."

Kaitlyn Davidson plays Ella in the musical on the road with Cinderella where she was also part of the Broadway cast. She also starred in Broadway’s Nice Work If You Can Get It and the national tour of White Christmas.

  Can a football game affect the outcome of an election? What about shark attacks? Or a drought? In a rational world the answer, of course, would be no.

But as bestselling historian Rick Shenkman explains in Political Animals: How Our Stone-Age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics, our world is anything but rational. Drawing on science, politics, and history, Shenkman explores the hidden forces behind our often illogical choices.

1/20/16 Panel

Jan 20, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  B. A. Shapiro brilliantly captured the world of art-theft and forgery in her critically acclaimed best-selling novel, The Art Forger.

Shapiro’s latest is The Muralist, a story about the birth of abstract-impressionism set against the backdrop of The Great Depression and the eve of World War II.

  Growing up in the rough outskirts of northern Dublin at a time when joining the guards, the army, or the civil service was the height of most parents’ ambitions for their children, Luke Waters knew he was destined for a career in some sort of law enforcement. Dreaming of becoming a police officer, Waters immigrated to the United States in search of better employment opportunities and joined the NYPD.

In NYPD Green Waters offers a gripping and fascinating account filled with details from real criminal cases involving murder, theft, gang violence, and more, and takes you into the thick of the danger and scandal of life as a New York cop—both on and off the beat.

  It's only the beginning of the year, but a leading contender for the word of 2016 may be dark. Dark is everywhere these days: dark money, dark fiber, dark matter, and dark software.

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler is here to tell is about the latter.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

  Suzanna Hermans from Oblong Books and Music joins us with this week's Book Picks list.

List:
The Expatriates by Janice Y.K. Lee
A Manual for Cleaning Women by Lucia Berlin
The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald
River Road by Carol Goodman (event Tues 1/19, 6pm, Rhinebeck)
The Apple Family by Richard Nelson
Simple Matters by Erin Boyle
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow (book group at Oblong Rhinebeck in Feb & March)
Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Pena, illustrated by Christian Robinson 

1/19/16 Panel

Jan 19, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Even as a child, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shocked by the terrible and unfair way African-American people were treated. When he grew up, he decided to do something about it—peacefully, with powerful words.

His story is told in the latest book in Brad Meltzer's New York Times Bestselling "Ordinary People Change the World" series, I am Martin Luther King Jr.

  Over the past half-century, the U.S. has seen profound demographic and cultural change. But racial progress still seems distant. After the faith of the civil rights movement, the fervor of multiculturalism, and even the brief euphoria of a “post-racial” moment, we remain a nation divided. Resegregation is the norm.

The culture wars flare as hot as ever. How do Americans see race now? Do we see each other any more clearly than before?

In Who We Be: A Cultural History of Race in Post-Civil Rights America, Jeff Chang, the award-winning author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation, looks anew at the tumultuous half-century from the peak of the civil rights era to the colorization and strife of the Obama years.

Pages