Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Ways to Connect

  The Nest is a story about the power of family, the possibilities of friendship, the ways we depend upon one another and the ways we let one another down.

In her tender, entertaining, and deftly written debut, Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney brings a remarkable cast of characters to life to illuminate what money does to relationships, what happens to our ambitions over the course of time, and the fraught yet unbreakable ties we share with those we love.

  Daniel Shapiro, Ph.D., is founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program and a world-renowned expert on conflict resolution. From advising leaders of war-torn countries to working with senior executives and families in crisis, Dan has helped thousands of organizations and individuals solve the problems that divide us. Drawing on these experiences and his practice-based research, he has developed a wealth of practical approaches to amplify influence and leadership—in business, in government, and in life.

His new book is Negotiating the Nonnegotiable: How to Resolve Your Most Emotionally Charged Conflicts.

5/23/16 Panel

May 23, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Vin Scully called the tenth-inning groundball in Game Six of the 1986 World Series - Mets versus Red Sox - that sealed a comeback, fueled a curse, and turned a batting champion into a scapegoat.

But getting there was a long, hard slog with plenty of heartache. After being knocked out of contention the previous two seasons, the Mets blasted through the National League that year. They won blowouts, nailbiters, fights, and a 14-inning game that ended with one pitcher on the mound, another in right field, and an All-Star catcher playing third base.

Matthew Silverman’s new book is One-Year Dynasty: Inside the Rise and Fall of the 1986 Mets, Baseball's Impossible One-and-Done Champions. He will be at The Low Beat in Albany, NY for a Happy Hour Mets event and book signing and he joins us. 

   Since its inception in 1984, the focus of The Jack Shainman Gallery has been to exhibit, represent and champion artists from around the world, in particular artists from Africa, East Asia, and North America.

Founded by Jack Shainman and Claude Simard in Washington D. C. -- the gallery relocated to New York City occupying a space in the East Village before moving to Soho and then to its current location in Chelsea in 1997.

In 2013 the gallery added two additional exhibition spaces, one in Chelsea and the other a 30,000 square foot schoolhouse in Kinderhook, New York.

The former Martin Van Buren Elementary School has been redesigned to include a 5,000 foot exhibition space with 24-foot ceilings, accompanied by traditional gallery spaces on the second floor that have been transformed from existing classrooms. The property sits on five acres of land that provide a temporary home for outdoor sculptural and site-specific installations. Its inaugural exhibition in 2014 was work by Nick Cave.

A Change of Place: Four Solo Exhibitions will mark The School’s second anniversary when it opens this Sunday.

The School's last group show, Winter in America, included some prints from a journal from the late 1800s that was found recently in the Kinderhook Memorial Library. The library is having a reception, also on Sunday, at The Feed & Seed store from 2-6pm.

Jack Shainman joins us along with Collections Manager, Rachel Fainter.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Edward Paulino, one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ Public Scholars and an assistant professor of history at John Jay College about the history of bearing witness to what is often unspeakable violence. In his recent book, Dividing Hispanola, he details the 20th century history of one of the world's bloodiest borders, that between Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

  Historian Chris Bray (himself a former soldier) has a new book: Court-Martial: How Military Justice Has Shaped America from the Revolution to 9/11 and Beyond. It is an account of how military justice has shaped American society since the nation’s beginnings.

With a great eye for narrative, tells the sweeping story of military justice from the institution of the court martial in the earliest days of the Republic to contemporary arguments over how to use military courts to try foreign terrorists or soldiers accused of sexual assault.

Throughout, he shows that the separate justice system of the armed forces has often served as a proxy for America’s ongoing arguments over equality, privacy, discrimination, security, and liberty. Chris Bray is a former infantry sergeant in the United States Army and holds a PhD in history from UCLA. 

5/20/16 Panel

May 20, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Guapa By Saleem Haddad

May 19, 2016

  Set over the course of twenty-four hours, Guapa follows Rasa, a gay man living in an unnamed Arab country, as he tries to carve out a life for himself in the midst of political and social upheaval. Rasa spends his days translating for Western journalists and pining for the nights when he can sneak his lover, Taymour, into his room.

One night Rasa's grandmother — the woman who raised him — catches them in bed together. The following day Rasa is consumed by the search for his best friend Maj, a fiery activist and drag queen star of the underground bar, Guapa, who has been arrested by the police. Ashamed to go home and face his grandmother, and reeling from the potential loss of the three most important people in his life, Rasa roams the city’s slums and prisons, the lavish weddings of the country’s elite, and the bars where outcasts and intellectuals drink to a long-lost revolution. 

  Donna McKechnie, The Tony Award-winning star of A Chorus Line returns to Barrington Stage Company in her concert, Same Place: Another Time, a musical déjà vu celebrating the scintillating 70’s in New York City. She takes a personal spin on the “ingénue” coming to NY, finding love and success and losing her innocence, perhaps, but never her spirit.

Same Place: Another Time will kick of this summer’s spectacular line-up at Mr. Finn’s Cabaret at BSC. She’ll perform the show at 8 p.m. on Sunday, May 22nd and Monday May 23rd.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Coming Up At The Linda

May 19, 2016

  Graeme McKenna joins us each week with a preview of what is coming up at The Linda: WAMC's Performing Arts Studio

  Best-selling historian Nathaniel Philbrick once again takes readers deep into the American Revolution, leading them into battles and illuminating the players on the field and behind the scenes. His latest - Valiant Ambition - is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation.

The focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of George Washington and Benedict Arnold. Philbrick gives readers a fresh view of America’s first president and offers a surprisingly sympathetic view of the man whose name is synonymous with the word traitor.

5/19/16 Panel

May 19, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Ira Glass is the host and creator of the public radio program This American Life. The show is heard each week by over 2.2 million listeners on more than 500 public radio stations, with another 2.2 million downloading the podcast. For years, the podcast of This American Life was the most popular podcast on iTunes, until the show started its first spin-off program Serial, which quickly became the most popular podcast ever created.

In Reinventing Radio, Ira will return to the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall to talk about how they put together This American Life.

  Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Richard Russo is one of America’s most celebrated fiction writers, as well as an acclaimed screenwriter and memoirist.

His new novel, Everybody’s Fool, is a sequel to his novel Nobody’s Fool, which revisits the upstate New York setting and characters of that highly-praised novel. 

  

An award-winning former advertising executive, Marshall Karp is a playwright and a screenwriter, and has written and produced numerous TV shows. Having paid his dues in Hollywood, he began killing the people he used to work with - in his novels - the Lomax and Biggs series.

And then he started collaborating with James Patterson and the duo have concocted four novels - NYPD Red 3 is the pair’s latest collaboration, following up NYPD Red 1 & 2 and Kill Me if You Can.

But, his latest novel brings him back to writing solo and to his Lomax and Biggs series and he is here to tell us about his latest, Terminal.

The Fireman By Joe Hill

May 17, 2016

From the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of NOS4A2, Horns and Heart-Shaped Box comes a chilling novel about a worldwide pandemic of spontaneous combustion that threatens to reduce civilization to ashes and a band of improbable heroes who battle to save it, led by one powerful and enigmatic man known as the Fireman.

Joe Hill’s new novel is The Fireman. No one knows exactly when it began or where it originated. A terrifying new plague is spreading like wildfire across the country, striking cities one by one: Boston, Detroit, Seattle. It is known as Dragonscale, a highly contagious, deadly spore that marks its hosts with beautiful black and gold marks across their bodies—before causing them to burst into flames.

On May 21 at the Palace Theatre in Albany, New York, The Empire State Youth Orchestra will come together to celebrate Music Without Borders as ESYO’s CHIME kids take to the stage for their first-ever public concert alongside our Empire State Wind Orchestra, and signature Empire State Youth Orchestra.

  

  New findings in behavioral science are giving us a better understanding about how our brains work, why we make the choices we do, and what it takes for us to be at our best. But it’s been challenging to see how to apply these insights in the real world.

In the new book How to Have a Good Day, economist and former McKinsey partner Caroline Webb shows us how to use recent discoveries from behavioral economics, psychology and neuroscience to transform our approach to everyday working life. 

  In The Violet Hour, Katie Roiphe takes an unexpected and liberating approach to the most unavoidable of subjects.

She investigates the last days of six great thinkers, writers, and artists as they come to terms with the reality of approaching death, or what T. S. Eliot called “the evening hour that strives Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea.”

This week's Book Picks  come from Phil Lewis of The Bennington Bookshop.

List:
The Last Painting of Sara de Vos by Dominic Smith
My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry by Fredrik Backman
All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Guest Room by Chris Bohjalian
Be Frank With Me by Julia Claiborne Johnson
The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddharta Mukherjee
Lost and Gone Forever by Alex Grecian

5/17/16 Panel

May 17, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Are children and adolescents being silenced and their growth stunted in the age of quick diagnoses and overmedication?

In The Silenced Child, Dr. Claudia Gold shows the tremendous power of listening in parent/child and doctor/patient relationships.

Claudia Gold, MD practices behavioral pediatrics in Great Barrington, MA. The author of Keeping Your Child In Mind, her articles on behavioral and mental health issues, in print and online, are widely followed. She is a graduate of the scholar’s program of the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute, and of the UMass Boston Infant-Parent Mental Health Fellowship.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and foster collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we will feature the work of: a pilot program in North Central Troy that seeks to provide at-risk children and their parents with a support system to help in their home life and help with the transition to middle school. The FOCAS (Family Opportunity Collaborative At Sunnyside) program uses a multi-faceted approach to address the family’s academic and non-academic barriers to success, among which are food security, a peer support system and financial literacy.

Sister Betsy Van Deusen has been director of community partnerships for diocesan Catholic Charities since 2013. This year marks her 25th in religious life.

  18-year-old Diggy Lessard is a senior at Woodstock Day School and he had created just about the coolest senior project we’ve ever heard of: Modern Vaudeville will tell the story of James Hurst’s "The Scarlet Ibis" through music, dance, and comedy in a one-night only variety show at BSP Lounge in Kingston, New York on May 22nd.

The event will benefit Woodstock Day School’s music programs and Diggy joins us now along with his father, Stefan Lessard – who happens to be the bassist for the Dave Matthews Band.

5/16/16 Panel

May 16, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The 11th Annual Berkshire International Film Festival will take place from June 2nd through the 5th in Great Barrington and June 3rd though the 5th in Pittsfield, MA.

The festival will bring films, filmmakers, industry professionals and film fans together for a celebration of independent film featuring documentaries, narrative features and short films – along with special tributes, parties, and discussions.

Kelley Vickery, Founder and Executive Director of BIFF and she joins us with a preview.

  The Albany Symphony and Music Director David Alan Miller will present Gustav Mahler’s youthful masterpiece, the Symphony No. 2, “Resurrection,” at the Palace Theater in Albany on May 14, 2016.

This major work from the late Romantic Period is scored for an enormous orchestra including off-stage brass and percussion, chorus, and two vocal soloists.

The Albany Symphony will be joined by the acclaimed voices of Albany Pro Musica, 120-members strong, under the direction of Jose Daniel Flores, as well as Met Opera Diva Lucille Beer and rising soprano, Angela Vallone. We welcome David Alan Miller and Jose Daniel Flores.

Mimi Sheraton
Noah Fecks

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Mimi Sheraton about food - the ethics of food, the idea of fad diets, and how to eat responsibly.

Mimi Sheraton is a noted food and restaurant critic. She is also a board member for The New York Council for the Humanities and she served as the scholar advisor on the Council's new "Food Fight" Reading & Discussion series.

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