Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu January 9, 2014

"Rethinking the 1950s: How Anticommunism and the Cold War Made America Liberal"

   Historians generally portray the 1950s as a conservative era when anticommunism and the Cold War subverted domestic reform, crushed political dissent, and ended liberal dreams of social democracy. These years, historians tell us, represented a turn to the right, a negation of New Deal liberalism, an end to reform.

Jennifer Delton argues that, far from subverting the New Deal state, anticommunism and the Cold War enabled, fulfilled, and even surpassed the New Deal's reform agenda. Anticommunism solidified liberal political power and the Cold War justified liberal goals such as jobs creation, corporate regulation, economic redevelopment, and civil rights.

In her book, Rethinking the 1950s: How Anticommunism and the Cold War Made America Liberal, Skidmore College History Professor Jennifer Delton shows how despite President Eisenhower's professed conservatism, he maintained the highest tax rates in U.S. history, expanded New Deal programs, and supported major civil rights reforms.

Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Albany Symphony Orchestra's January 11th And 12th Concerts

  It is a big weekend for the Albany Symphony Orchestra. One of the greatest pianists alive today, André Watts, takes the stage on January 11th and it will be Symphony Sunday featuring Beethoven on the 12th - both concerts taking place at the Palace Theatre in Albany.

Maestro David Alan Miller joins us to tell us more.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu January 9, 2014

"Cutting Along The Color Line" By Quincy T. Mills

   Today, black-owned barbershops play a central role in African American public life. The intimacy of commercial grooming encourages both confidentiality and camaraderie, which make the barber shop an important gathering place for African American men to talk freely.

But for many years preceding and even after the Civil War, black barbers endured a measure of social stigma for perpetuating inequality: though the profession offered economic mobility to black entrepreneurs, black barbers were obliged by custom to serve an exclusively white clientele.

In his book, Cutting Along the Color Line, Vassar History Professor Quincy Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barber shops as businesses and civic institutions.

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The Roundtable
9:00 am
Thu January 9, 2014

1/9/14 Panel

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus, Ira Fusfeld.

Topics include:
Christie Bridge Controversy
State of the State - NY
Gates on Biden
Baseball Hall of Fame
Zero Tolerance in Schools

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"The Girls of Atomic City" By Denise Kiernan

    The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage.

At the height of World War II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of the world, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians--many of them young women from small towns across the South--were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war--when Oak Ridge's secret was revealed.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Jacob's Oath" By Martin Fletcher

Martin Fletcher has been called the gold standard of TV war correspondents and is rapidly building a new reputation as an author. He has won almost every award in television journalism, including 5 Emmys.

His latest novel is Jacob's Oath. As World War II comes to a close, Europe’s roads are clogged with 20 million exhausted refugees walking home. Among them are Jacob and Sarah, lonely holocaust survivors who meet in Huddle berg. Jacob is consumed with hatred and cannot rest until he kills his brother’s murderer, a concentration camp guard.

He must now choose between revenge and love, and avenging the past and building a new future. 

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Organize & Create Discipline" By Justin Klosky

    There are more parts of life that need to be organized than ever before. No longer just junk drawers and closets; now electronics, inboxes, garages, relationships, calendars, passwords, money and more all need attention, space and a way to be accounted for.

No one knows this better than Justin Klosky, founder of The O.C.D. Experience and author of the new book Organize & Create Discipline: An A-to-Z Guide to an Organized Existence

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Secrets & Lies" By Jane Isay

  Secrets, large and small, are a fact of human life. The new book, Secrets & Lies, explores the impact of keeping secrets; how they can damage our sense of self, jeopardize relationships and also the healing power of truth.

Author Jane Isay has found, people survive learning the most disturbing facts that have been hidden from them. And secret keepers are relieved when they finally reveal themselves--and things they are ashamed of--to the people they care about. Much depends, Isay writes, on the way of telling and the way of hearing.

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The Roundtable
9:00 am
Wed January 8, 2014

1/8/14 Panel

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Newsman Ray Graf, Daily Gazette editor, Judy Patrick, and Capital New York report Jimmy Vielkind.

Topics include:
Gates on Obama
Senate on Benefits
Hillary Clinton Money
NY State of the State

WAMC Programs
3:06 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

The Book Show #1329 - Scott Turow

  Scott Turow knows how to write legal thrillers. The lawyer-novelist has penned bestsellers like Presumed Innocent and Burden of Proof.

He latest novel is Identical - and while there are lawyers and an unsolved murder, it is a story about the almost mystical connection that binds together identical twins.

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