Joe Donahue

Vice President, News and Programming

Joe talks to people on the radio for a living. In addition to countless impressive human "gets" - he has talked to a lot of Muppets. Joe grew up in Philadelphia, has been on the area airwaves for more than 25 years and currently lives in Washington County, NY with his wife, Kelly, and their dog, Brady. And yes, he reads every single book. 

Pages

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu December 19, 2013

"Sex Itself" By Sarah Richardson

 Human genomes are 99.9 percent identical—with one prominent exception. Instead of a matching pair of X chromosomes, men carry a single X, coupled with a tiny chromosome called the Y.

Using methods from history, philosophy, and gender studies of science, Sarah Richardson examines in her new book, Sex Itself, how gender has helped to shape the research practices, questions asked, theories and models, and descriptive language used in sex chromosome research.

Sarah Richardson is assistant professor of the history of science and of studies of women, gender, and sexuality at Harvard University.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu December 19, 2013

"Sharing Is Good" By Beth Buczynski

  Society is at a crossroads. We can either continue on the path of consumption at any cost, or we can make new choices that will lead to a happier, more rewarding life, while helping to preserve the planet for future generations. Unfortunately, we can't all afford to install solar panels or buy a Prius. Does this mean we are doomed in our quest to live a truly sustainable life?

According to our next guest, collaborative consumption is a new way of living, in which access is valued over ownership, experience is valued over material possessions, and "mine" becomes "ours," and everyone's needs are met without waste.

Beth Buczynski is a freelance writer and editor who covers clean technology, sustainable design and environmental issues. Her new book is Sharing is Good: How to Save Money, Time and Resources through Collaborative Consumption.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Family Of Norman Rockwell Angered Over Conclusions Drawn In New Rockwell Biography

  A week ago on this program, we spoke to art critic Deborah Solomon about her new biography of iconic artist, Norman Rockwell, American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell. The book is a 493-page account of the life and work of the longtime illustrator for The Saturday Evening Post.

Since the release of the book and recording of our interview with Solomon, the family of Norman Rockwell has come out saying they are angered by the book and shocked at the suggestions that Rockwell could have been secretly gay or had pedophilic impulses.

A statement issued by the Norman Rockwell Family Agency says – "Ms. Solomon's conclusions demand scrutiny. The Family now feels that her purpose in befriending us and writing this fictionalized account was publicity, financial gain and self-aggrandizement.”

Thomas Rockwell is Norman Rockwell’s second son and an author. Perhaps best known for his young adult classic, How to Eat Fried Worms He joins us along with his daughter, Norman Rockwell’s granddaughter, Abigail Rockwell.

The Roundtable
9:00 am
Thu December 19, 2013

12/19/13 Panel

  Today's panelists are WAMC newsman Ray Graf, WAMC’s Alan Chartock and Daily Gazette editor, Judy Patrick.

Topics include:
Target Stolen Shopper Data
Data Mining
Health Care Poll
Death Penalty
FCC Blackout Rule

Science & Technology
11:35 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Jesse Feiler - Ebooks Today

    Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us to discuss what’s new in ebooks and apps.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, consultant, trainer, and author. His books include iOS 6 Foundations, and the forthcoming Sams Teach Yourself Objective-C Second Edition. His apps include Minutes Machine the iPad-based app for managing meetings, agendas, and minutes; and Saranac River Trail app.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Liza Donnelly On "Women On Men"

    It is always a thrill to welcome New Yorker Cartoonist Liza Donnelly to the program. She has a new book of cartoons and writing, Women on Men that is available as an e-book.

The book is a collection of over 200 of her cartoons. The theme is primarily about women being funny.

Liza Donnelly has been publishing cartoons in the New Yorker since 1982. She is also a weekly columnist and cartoonist for Forbes.com, specializing in politics and women’s rights, and for three years, Donnelly has been drawing a weekly cartoon on gender issues and women’s rights for the news site, Women’s Enews.

Arts & Culture
10:10 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Wendell Minor’s America At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Wendell Minor - The Manhattan Bridge

    Wendell Minor is considered one of our nation’s premier historical illustrators. He travels throughout the United States to research, draw and paint on location, and immerse himself in the subject at hand.

The Norman Rockwell Museum is celebrating the artist’s four-decade career, highlighting his many cover illustrations and 25th anniversary illustrating children’s books, each inspired by his love of history, art, science, and the natural world. Wendell Minor’s America is on view at the museum through May 26, 2014.

The exhibit traces the Minor’s artistic journey through original artwork, artifacts, and references from his expansive visual chronicles, as well as commentary about his collaborations with our nation’s most prominent authors, scientists, and historians.

The Roundtable
9:00 am
Wed December 18, 2013

12/18/13 Panel

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao and chief of Capital New York's Albany bureau, Jimmy Vielkind.

Topics include:
Budget Deal Reprieve
Interrogation Report
Indian Diplomat
Rodman back to North Korea
Moreland Commission subpoenas
Reaction to the NYT "invisible child" series
Trump for Governor

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue December 17, 2013

"Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, And The Gap Between Us And Them" By Joshuar Greene

    Joshua Greene is the John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and the director of the Moral Cognition Laboratory in the Department of Psychology, Harvard University.

In his new book, Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them, he explores the underlying causes of modern conflict.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue December 17, 2013

"American Exodus" By Giles Slade

    Some scientists predict the sea will rise one and a half meters before 2100, but rapidly melting polar ice caps could make the real amount much higher. In the coming century, intensifying storms will batter our coasts, and droughts and heat events will be annual threats. All this will occur as population grows, and declining water resources desiccate agriculture. What will happen when the United States cannot provide food or fresh water for the overheated, overcrowded cities where 80 percent of Americans currently live?

Read more

Pages