Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is an NPR international correspondent covering South America for NPR. She is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Previously, she served a NPR's correspondent based in Israel, reporting on stories happening throughout the Middle East. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, and an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement.

Before her assignment to Jerusalem began in 2009, Garcia-Navarro served for more than a year as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief and before that three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. In 2002, she began a two-year reporting stint based in Iraq.

In addition to the Murrow award, Garcia-Navarro was honored with the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community." She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

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The Two-Way
1:26 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Brazil Furious Over Ad Showing Christ The Redeemer In An Italian Jersey

A video image from an advertisement run by Italian state broadcaster RAI showing Christ the Redeemer in an Italian soccer jersey.
YouTube

It's the most iconic image of Brazil: the Christ the Redeemer statue, perched atop Rio de Janiero, looking down with his arms spread wide in love and understanding.

Now imagine the towering figure wearing a soccer jersey — and not even Brazil's.

Controversy has broken out over an Italian TV advertisement for the World Cup that shows the sculpture draped in the blue jersey of the Azzurri, or Italy's national team, and featuring the slogan "Brazil awaits us."

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Sports
5:25 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Soccer Fans Eager To Get World Cup Action Underway

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 9:48 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Latin America
4:33 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

With 2 Days Till Kickoff, World Cup Host City Is Stricken By Strike

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 12:12 am

The World Cup kicks off in two days, and fans are pouring into Brazil. But in Sao Paulo, the site of the opening game, metro workers are striking over pay, fueling fierce clashes.

NPR Story
6:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Scientist Touts Exoskeleton That Could Offer A Chance To Walk Again

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 1:20 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This Thursday, the eyes of the world will be on Brazil during the World Cup's opening ceremony. And there'll be a remarkable moment during that event. From São Paulo, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Striking Train Workers Add To Brazil's World Cup Woes

There was chaos at the Corinthians-Itaquera subway station on the east side of Sao Paulo on Thursday, as workers went on strike.
Werther Santana DPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 4:05 pm

First came the bus strike. Then came the teachers. Now it's the train workers' turn.

Sao Paulo will see the kickoff to the World Cup next week, but with only a few days to go, it's chaos on the streets of South America's biggest city.

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Parallels
3:34 am
Thu June 5, 2014

As Brazil Barrels Toward World Cup, Brazilians Aren't Feeling It

Corinthians Arena in Sao Paulo, Brazil, holds a test match Sunday ahead of the World Cup. One fan who attended said the country "didn't deliver" and isn't ready for the event.
Migquel Schincariol AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 6:47 pm

The stadium where the opening game of the World Cup will be played is a gleaming monument to the world's favorite sport, soccer. The Corinthians Arena — named after one of Brazil's most famous teams, which will take it over — has been built from scratch and boasts a massive LCD screen and state-of-the-art facilities.

Last weekend, it was full of fans watching the last test match before the World Cup begins. It was supposed to be a sort of final run-through to make sure everything is ready and working.

Except it wasn't.

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Latin America
4:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

As World Cup Approaches, Brazilians Aren't Exactly Thrilled

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 8:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Just nine days to go before the World Cup soccer tournament begins in Brazil. And a poll released today by the Pew Research Center shows that the mood among Brazilians is grim. NPR's Lordes Garcia-Navarro reports a country that seemed to be taking off just a few years ago feels like it's crashing, instead.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken).

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Shots - Health News
5:16 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever.
Friedemann Vogel Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:11 pm

In Sao Paulo's poor north zone, in the neighborhood of Tucuruvi, teams of city workers knock on doors, warning people to take pets and small children out of the area.

Quickly after, men in hazmat suits with metal cylinders strapped to their backs start spraying the street, and some of the interiors of the homes, with powerful pesticides. This is the front line of the war on dengue fever in Brazil's largest city.

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Parallels
4:03 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

For Brazil's Soccer Stars, Careers Often Begin On Makeshift Fields

Brazilian kids play soccer in a favela, or shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday. Brazil is hosting the World Cup next month and its team is considered the favorite. Many of the country's top players learned the game playing in the street or on dirt fields.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:54 pm

The road to World Cup glory in Brazil doesn't start in fancy soccer clubs or private schoolyards. It often begins in places like this poor neighborhood called Rio Pequeno in Sao Paulo and on a dirt lot, where a group of children are playing soccer.

Brazil is hosting the World Cup, which starts in less than a month, and the country is also favored to win. Brazil is already a five-time champion and it has played in every World Cup since the tournament's inception.

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Parallels
2:32 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Meet Uruguay's Pot-Legalizing, VW-Driving, Sandal-Wearing President

Uruguay's President Jose Mujica, who is known for his modest lifestyle, sits outside his home on the outskirts of Montevideo earlier this month. Under his leadership, Uruguay legalized marijuana, from the growing to the selling.
Matilde Campodonico AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:58 pm

As Uruguay's President Jose Mujica likes to say, his personal story seems like the stuff of fiction.

He was a leftist guerrilla who was imprisoned for more than a decade. He's known for driving a 1987 Volkswagen Beetle, wearing sandals to meetings and living in a simple farmhouse on the outskirts of the capital.

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