Nina Gregory

Nina Gregory is a senior editor for NPR's Arts Desk, where she oversees coverage of film and television across the network, including editing and assigning stories on art, design, fashion, food, and culture.

Gregory started at NPR on Christmas Eve in 2006 as an overnight editor for Morning Edition. In her time at NPR, she has covered everything from the financial crisis to elections, the Sundance film festival, and Comic-Con. She has worked on interviews and profiles of people including ballerina Wendy Whelan, director Ava DuVernay, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, punk icon Iggy Pop, and Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy, which earned a Gracie award.

Before coming to NPR, Gregory worked as a freelancer and on staff at various magazines and web sites. She contributed to the Los Angeles Times, the LA Weekly, Grand Royal, Intersection, TransWorld Skateboarding, and TransWorld Stance. For years, she wrote about video games, music, and pop culture for youth-oriented publications.

Gregory received a bachelor's degree from UCLA in World Arts and Cultures, and a master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She still teaches at the Daily Bruin at UCLA, where she worked for the paper and radio station.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Newsdesk Editor Barbara Campbell:

This essay by Sarah Gailey is a hoot. It also feels true, delving into cartoon characters to ask why the women have to be villains to be bold, to seek power, to act now.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

At his TED Talk in Vancouver last week, Bill Gates posed the idea that, "If anything kills over 10 million people in the next few decades, it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus, rather than a war. Not missiles, but microbes." He noted how the Ebola crisis in West Africa, which has taken about 10,000 lives, revealed serious problems in our global health care system. It's not that the systems didn't work well enough, he said. "We didn't have a system at all." He called the response "a global failure."

One of the presentations at the TED Conference in Vancouver this week that had much of the tech elite oohing and ahhing was something called CLIP (no relation to Microsoft's reviled animated helper) or Continuous Liquid Interface Production.

Not every dancer can be a ballerina, and not every ballerina gets to dance with the New York City Ballet. So when one makes it, and then stays with the company for three decades, it's a big deal.

Wendy Whelan is that ballerina. And on Saturday night, at 47 years old, she'll give her final New York City Ballet performance before she retires.