Paul Tuthill

Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief

Paul Tuthill is WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief. He’s been covering news, everything from politics and government corruption to natural disasters and the arts, in western Massachusetts since 2007. Before joining WAMC, Paul was a reporter and anchor at WRKO in Boston.  He was news director for more than a decade at WTAG in Worcester.  Paul has won more than two dozen Associated Press Broadcast Awards. He won an Edward R. Murrow award for reporting on veterans’ healthcare for WAMC in 2011.  Born and raised in western New York, Paul did his first radio reporting while he was a student at the University of Rochester.

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A new economic report is painting a much brighter picture of job growth in Massachusetts.  WAMC’s Paul Tuthill reports…

MassBenchmarks released an analysis on Wednesday showing that the state appeared to have added 38,900 jobs during the first nine months of 2011. That compares with a revised estimate issued last month by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics that showed Massachusetts only gained 2,300 jobs during the same period - a figure that had been questioned by Governor Deval Patrick and other state officials.

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            After almost two years of lobbying, a band of liberal political activists have persuaded Massachusetts Democratic Congressman Richard Neal to endorse some of their legislation.. This as the veteran congressman faces a Democratic primary challenge in a newly drawn district.   WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

 

A series of proposals aimed at cracking down on crime are pending before the city council in western Massachusetts' largest city. Several of the public safety initiatives proposed in Springfield are intended to reduce illegal guns, and are being considered in the aftermath of recent horrific gun violence. WAMC's Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

   Experienced disaster response volunteers are canvassing the tornado devastated neighborhoods of Springfield Massachusetts to conduct a needs assessment.  Local organizations will use the  collected information to help people still struggling to recover from the storm.   WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

Gasoline prices in Massachusetts continue to climb, although not as rapidly as in recent weeks.  WAMC’s Paul Tuthill reports…

The average price for unleaded regular self serve gasoline in Massachusetts rose two cents last week.  The average price, according to a survey by AAA is $3.89 per gallon. Prices ranged between $3.78 and $3.99 per gallon.  The price is 23 cents per gallon more than a year ago.

Gasoline prices have gone up for five straight weeks, but some energy analysts believe a peak is near.

Paul Tuthill, WAMC News.

There is debate currently in several states including Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut about raising the minimum wage. A group in one western Massachusetts city is pushing for what it calls a “living wage” WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

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Events to mark the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic are scheduled for later this week by the Titanic Historical Society.  The oldest and largest organization in the world devoted to preserving the history of the doomed luxury liner is headquartered in Springfield Massachusetts.  WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau  Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

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Civil rights authorities say they've seen a serious uptick in housing discrimination complaints in Massachusetts.  Its further fall out from the foreclosure crisis.  WAMC's Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

A Massachusetts man convicted of conspiring to help al-Qaida has been sentenced by a federal judge in Boston to 17 and a half years in prison.

Budget writers in the Massachusetts House have proposed a $32.3 billion state spending plan.

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Helping people help themselves to someday leave public housing was the goal of a conference Wednesday sponsored by the public housing authority in Springfield Massachusetts.  WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

    Every parent seeks a better life for their children was the motivational message aimed at more than 100 mostly young parents who attended today’s conference, some with their children in tow.

The five member Massachusetts Gaming Commission held its first public meeting Tuesday as it set about to bring casino gambling to the state.   WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

     Declaring  the decades long debate over whether to bring casinos to Massachusetts is over, Stephen Crosby, the chairman of the powerful gaming commission, said he and the other four appointees were ready to get to work to implement the public policy in the best way they can.  He pledged that much of that work would take place in full public view.

  Faced with a major decrease in property tax collections and no
expected increase in state aid, budget writers in Springfield
Massachusetts are proposing scores of fee hikes. But the city's top
finance officer says it still won't be  enough to avoid budget cuts.
WAMC's Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports..

  Law enforcement is slowly embracing social media as a crime
fighting tool. The latest example was announced Monday in Northampton
Massachusetts, as we hear from WAMC's Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul
Tuthill.

        The Northwestern District Attorney, David Sullivan announced the
launch of a text-a-tip program designed to help police solve crimes in
the 47 cities and towns in Hampshire and Franklin counties.

The five member Massachusetts Gaming Commission is now in place. The commissioners will draft regulations to establish a new casino gambling industry in Massachusetts and award the much coveted licenses for resort casinos.  One member of the new commission is from western Massachusetts. Bruce Stebbins is a Springfield resident, a former member of the city council, and a small business development specialist.    He spoke recently with WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill.

The second largest public school system in Massachusetts is going to make condoms available to students as young as 12 beginning this fall. The school committee in Springfield, Thursday night, approved a condom availability policy that proponents say will become  part of a comprehensive effort to combat one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy in the state. WAMC's  Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.
       

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