Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a congressional correspondent for NPR. He also co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015 to cover the presidential election. He focused on the Republican side of the 2016 race, spending time on the campaign trail with Donald Trump, and also reported on the election's technology and data angles.

Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter for member stations WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and KQED in San Francisco, California. He has also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, despite spending most of his time in the newsroom, and also has a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Political Reporter Scott Detrow:

For many people interested in policy and politics, Robert Caro's The Power Broker is a sort of bible.

Hillary Clinton snagged another endorsement over the weekend, but don't expect her to trumpet it on the campaign trail.

"I have a little announcement to make ... I'm voting for Hillary. I am endorsing Hillary," noted conservative author P.J. O'Rourke said on NPR's Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me. The episode aired over the weekend.

Donald Trump could solidify his position as the Republican Party's all-but-certain nominee with a win in Indiana Tuesday.

Ted Cruz is hoping an endorsement from Indiana Gov. Mike Pence could help him buck recent polls and carry the Hoosier State.

It took them nearly two months to do so, but John Kasich and Ted Cruz are finally taking Mitt Romney's advice.

When the 2012 Republican nominee lambasted front-runner Donald Trump in March, he called for a strategic effort to stop the New York businessman.

You might have noticed something different about Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump lately.

Donald Trump wants the Republicans to alter the party platform on a fundamental issue for many conservative activists — abortion.

The GOP platform, which is formally adopted at the Republican National Convention, has included language every election year since 1984 with support for a human life amendment to the Constitution and a call for "legislation to make it clear that the Fourteenth Amendment's protections apply to unborn children."

(The 14th Amendment says no state shall "deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.")

This was supposed to be a quiet week for Mike Rendino. He manages Stan's, the bar across the street from Yankee Stadium, and the Yankees are in Toronto.

Instead, it's been bedlam.

Rendino said he's "been inundated with phone calls, emails, contacts on Facebook from the strangers, most random people. The New York Times, the Washington Post."

On the way into the Colorado Republican Party's state convention in Colorado Springs Saturday morning, a Ted Cruz supporter waved a big broom with the letters "CRUZ" fastened to the top.

The convention took place in a hockey arena, and the prop is probably familiar to most sports fans. The Cruz supporter was looking for a sweep, and a sweep was what he got.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Republican presidential primary race is revolving entirely around the Broadmoor World Arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday.

That's where Colorado Republicans are meeting to elect 13 statewide delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention.

In a contest that takes 1,237 delegates to win the nomination, 13 – or even the full 37 Colorado will send to Cleveland — may seem like a minuscule total.

Hillary Clinton is blasting Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and Donald Trump for foreign policy stances she argues would "make America less safe and the world more dangerous."

Clinton spoke at Stanford University one day after terror attacks killed more than 30 people in Brussels, Belgium. The former secretary of state said, "the threat we face from terrorism is real, it is urgent, and it knows no boundaries."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, a lot of voting is going to be taking place tomorrow. And one of the big states we'll be focusing on is the state of Ohio. And NPR's Scott Detrow is there. He has been following the race on the Democratic side. Scott, good morning.

Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and John Kasich meet Thursday in the 11th debate of this year's Republican presidential primary. It airs at 9 p.m. ET on Fox News.

It's the first forum since Trump won seven states on Super Tuesday, solidifying his status as the candidate to beat in the Republican field. It's also the first debate since last week's raucous insult-fest in Houston.

If Marco Rubio ends up with the Republican presidential nomination, it could be because he played Quidditch better than Donald Trump or Ted Cruz.

Stick with us for a second.

On the eve of the Nevada presidential primary caucuses, the State Department released an additional 1,116 pages of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails.

Portions of 64 documents were retroactively classified as confidential, according to a State Department official. That's the lowest level of classification. The latest batch of emails did not include any Secret or Top Secret documents, according to the official.

Donald Trump has feuded with other candidates, reporters and TV networks during his run for president.

Now, the front-runner for the Republican nomination is feuding with Pope Francis.

On Thursday, the pontiff criticized Trump for the proposal at the heart of his campaign: a pledge to keep people from crossing into the United States illegally by building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

"I'd just say that this man is not Christian if he said it in this way," Francis told reporters in a midflight press conference after a trip to Mexico.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Carly Fiorina is exiting the Republican presidential race after a seventh-place showing in last night's New Hampshire primary.

"While I suspend my candidacy today, I will continue to travel this country and fight for those Americans who refuse to settle for the way things are and a status quo that no longer works for them," said Fiorina in a statement.

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

In a year where so many Republican voters are angry at Washington, it can be tough to have two former presidents in your family.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has struggled with that dynamic his entire campaign — sometimes embracing the Bush legacy, and sometimes holding it at arm's length. (The campaign logo is Jeb!, not Bush!)

In New Hampshire, the night after the Iowa caucuses, it was hard not to feel the "Marco-mentum."

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio stood on a stage surrounded by more than 700 rowdy supporters, who filled Exeter's picturesque town hall to the brink.

Rubio delivered the same stump speech he's been sticking to for months. But Tuesday night, fresh off his surprisingly strong third-place Iowa finish, the crowd ate up every line.

Harry Rubenstein is deep in a thought about a log cabin when he pauses, mid-sentence, and disappears down a corridor.

He returns a moment later brandishing a large wooden ax.

Rubenstein is the chair of the political history division at the Smithsonian Museum of American History, and he's standing in a room that's packed with about 100,000 items from previous presidential elections. The collection, he says, ranges "from a little bit before the American Revolution, to probably last week."

It's easy to get cynical about the presidential campaign, especially so close to the first round of voting, when many candidates are on the attack.

But see it up close and personal, and the process can feel a bit more charming. That's what a class from Indiana's Manchester University found as it traveled across Iowa last week, taking in the caucuses.

Four years ago, the Iowa caucuses were very, very good to former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.

In a race where seemingly every Republican candidate took a turn at the head of the polls, Santorum peaked at just the right time. He won a razor-thin race in Iowa, proclaimed "game on" to a caucus-night crowd, and went on to be 2012's GOP runner-up.

Things are different this time for the 2012 caucus victor.

Campaigning in Des Moines this week, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum took pains to regularly remind voters that he won Iowa's 2012 caucuses.

"You did a great job in my opinion," he told a crowd of about two dozen. "You could have done a little better job in your math, but you did a great job otherwise."

Four years later, the Republican Party of Iowa is bringing in Microsoft to help with those math skills.

With just hours to go before the end of the year, presidential campaigns are blasting supporters with emails in an attempt to boost their fundraising totals for the fourth quarter of 2015.

But one Republican presidential campaign is already eagerly promoting its haul.

On Wednesday night, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's campaign distributed a memo touting a total of $45 million raised over the course of 2015.

Data collection and analysis is a central aspect of a modern political campaign. It's just that usually, campaigns don't really talk about it.

But on Saturday night, the very first question in the Democratic presidential debate was all about the voter files that the Democratic National Committee maintains for its candidates to use.

That's because earlier in the week, several of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' staffers had accessed, viewed and saved sensitive files belonging to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's campaigns.

This post was updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign has filed a lawsuit against the Democratic National Committee to regain access to the committee's voter file. The DNC blocked the campaign from the resource Friday after a Sanders staffer accessed data collected and organized by Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Unless you've spent the past year or so in an ice cave on Hoth — or have the misfortune of living on a planet farthest from the bright center of the universe — you're probably aware there's a new Star Wars movie, The Force Awakens, coming out on Friday.

If you've given money to a political campaign, brace yourself.

You're going to be seeing a whole lot of emails in your inbox over the next couple of weeks, asking for money as the year draws to a close.

Those emails will take many different forms:

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