The Academic Minute for 10.6-10.10

Oct 10, 2014

The Academic Minute for 10.6.2014 - 10.10.2014

Monday, October 6
Kathryn Heinze - University of Michigan   
Football Philanthropy
Kathryn Heinze joined the School of Kinesiology in 2011 as an Assistant Professor of Sport Management, after earning her PhD in Management and Organizations (with a minor in Sociology) from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Kathryn’s research examines the role of sport in community wellness and development, including the motivations and processes of organizational and institutional change. She worked on this study with Sara Soderstrom, Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies and Program in the Environment, also at The University of Michigan.
 
Tuesday, October 7

Feilin Hsiao - University of The Pacific    
Cochlear Implants and Music
Dr. Feilin Hsiao directs University of the Pacific’s Music Therapy Program, established 75 years ago as one of the first such programs in the United States. Dr. Hsiao holds a Ph.D. in music education with an emphasis in music therapy from the University of Iowa, an M.A. in music therapy from New York University, and a B.A. in piano performance from the Chinese Cultural University in Taipei, Taiwan. She is a board-certified music therapist with extensive clinical and supervisory experience in special education, early intervention, youth homes, burn rehabilitation, geriatrics, and geriatric psychiatry. She also holds teacher credentials in both music education and special education.
 
Wednesday, October 8

Kristen Malecki - University of Wisconsin Madison
Green Space Awareness
Dr. Kristen Malecki received her Masters of Public Health (MPH) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Environmental Epidemiology and Health Policy from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. After graduation she was a Council for State and Territorial Epidemiology Fellow and worked for the Wisconsin Department of Health Services in their Environmental Public Health Tracking Program. She is currently a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health and Co-Director for the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin. Her current research focuses on developing new and novel tools for measuring environmental exposures and the interaction between environmental and psychosocial factors on population health and health equity. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, running with friends and spending time outdoors.  

Thursday, October 9
Ying Xu - University of Georgia
Hypoxia
Dr. Ying Xu is a computational biologist with current research interests in cancer systems biology and microbial bioinformatics. He is a professor and endowed chair in computational biology and bioinformatics in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and also adjunct professor in the departments of Computer Science and Statistics at the University of Georgia. Originally trained as a computer scientist with a Ph.D. degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1991, he is currently studying fundamental biology problems using computer technology and statistics as tools. He has published over 300 research articles and five books in bioinformatics and computational biology. Learn more about his Computational Systems Biology Lab.
 
Friday, October 10
Erika Berg - North Dakota State University           
Equine Therapy
Dr. Erika Berg received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Animal Science from Purdue University. She earned her Ph.D. with a focus on equine metabolic pathophysiology from the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri. Dr. Berg became involved in the field of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) as an undergraduate and has continued to pursue this area of interest throughout her career. Dr. Berg holds her Advanced Level Instructor certification through the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) and serves as a PATH Intl. Faculty Evaluator and PATH Intl. State Chair of North Dakota. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at North Dakota State University where she oversees the interdisciplinary minor in Therapeutic Horsemanship. Dr. Berg’s developing research program focuses on how horse and human interactions affect both equine and human participants. She is currently investigating the effects of an equine assisted psychotherapy program for at-risk youth in a residential child care facility and evaluating stress behaviors in therapy horses.