The Academic Minute for 11.24 -11.28

Nov 28, 2014

Hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving! If you happened to miss a segment this holiday week, be sure to catch up at Academic Minute.org

Monday, November 24
James Hanna - Virginia Tech
The Physics of Whirling Dervishes
James Hanna is a mechanician interested in the dynamics of very flexible structures, such as ropes, chains, flags, leaves, and paper. Dr. Hanna is an assistant professor in the department of Engineering Science and Mechanics at Virginia Tech.
 
Tuesday, November 25
Allison Redlich - University at Albany      
Mental Health Courts
Dr. Allison D. Redlich is an associate professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York, University at Albany. Prior to that, she was a Senior Research Associate at Policy Research Associates and a Research Scientist at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of California, Davis. Professor Redlich is a nationally recognized expert on police interrogations and false confessions, particularly with vulnerable populations such as persons with mental illness and juveniles. In addition to this area of study, Professor Redlich conducts research on Mental Health Courts and other forms of criminal justice diversion. She has published extensively in both areas and is often asked to provide expert testimony. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Justice, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and NARSAD: The Mental Health Research Association. Professor Redlich is active in two divisions of the American Psychological Association, including serving on the Executive Committees of the American Psychology-Law Society and the Society for Child and Family Practice and Policy.  
 
Wednesday, November 26
Jason Silverman - Winthrop University
Abraham Lincoln & Immigration
A specialist in the history of the Old South and Civil War, Dr. Jason Silverman received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia and his graduate degrees at Colorado State University and the University of Kentucky. Before coming to Winthrop in 1984, Silverman was a member of the faculty of Yale University, where he taught for four years. Author or editor of 11 books, Silverman has won numerous awards for his teaching and three of his books have been nominated for national book awards. Among his teaching awards, he has received Winthrop University’s Outstanding Junior Professor Award, been named the University’s Distinguished Professor, received the Phi Kappa Phi Excellence in Teaching Award three times, and, in 1990, became the first person in Winthrop’s history to be named South Carolina Professor of the Year. Recently, Silverman was named the inaugural Ellison Capers Palmer, Jr. Professor of History at Winthrop. His new book on Abraham Lincoln and the immigrant will be published in 2015 by Southern Illinois University Press in their Concise Lincoln Library Series. For eight years, from 2002-2010, he served two elected terms on the Rock Hill School Board.
 
Thursday, November 27
Michael Jenkins - University of Scranton
Fighting Crime with Data
Dr. Michael Jenkins was named assistant professor of criminal justice. Previously he was an assistant professor at the University of New Haven, a lecturer at The University of Scranton, and an adjunct lecturer at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He also worked as a case manager at the Police Institute at Rutgers.  In that capacity he worked closely with social service agencies and the New Jersey State Parole Board. Dr. Jenkins earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and philosophy from The University of Scranton. He earned his master’s and doctorate in criminal justice from Rutgers. He resides in Clarks Green.

Friday, November 28
Jeffrey Fortin - Emmanuel College                 
Historical Identity Theft
Born in Hawai’i, Dr. Jeffrey Fortin learned to walk while aboard a sailboat, which may be why his research and teaching interests revolve around the sea and the maritime world. Academic tourism is a great benefit of being a historian, with his most recent project took him from London to Halifax, Nova Scotia to New Bedford, MA and many spots in-between to conduct research in sometimes dusty, sometimes state-of-the-art archives. Once he received his PhD from the University of New Hampshire in 2006, he began a tenure-track position at SUNY - Oneonta, where he stayed for 5 years until being hired by Emmanuel College, Boston in 2012. He is currently writing the first new biography on Paul Cuffe - a celebrated African American sea captain, entrepreneur, philanthropist - in nearly 30 years.