Any Questions?
7:29 am
Fri December 23, 2011

Any Questions? #17

Albany, NY – WAMC's Ian Pickus and resident quizzer Mike Nothnagel are all about the Benjamins on this week's currency show.

Last week's challenge

Take the last name of a famous cartoon family. If you change the first letter to a W, you can rearrange the result to spell one of the nicknames for a place where many cartoons have been produced. What is the last name and what is the nickname?

Answer: The family's last name is FLINTSTONE, and the nickname is TINSELTOWN.

THIS WEEK'S CATEGORY: U.S. CURRENCY

On-air questions: To commemorate the Federal Reserve Act, which was signed on December 23, 1913 by President Woodrow Wilson, this week's quiz is about U.S. currency.

1. U.S. city whose mint produces coins marked with the letter D
2. Historical document being presented to Congress in the image on the reverse of a $2 bill
3. Metal that constitutes the other 75% of a U.S. five-cent coin, which is actually only 25% nickel
4. Only woman who has ever had her portrait appear on U.S. paper currency
5. Number of Hamiltons in a Benjamin, colloquially speaking

Extra credit
1. Word missing from the reverse of many 1883 Liberty head nickels, to the delight of counterfeiters
2. Number of times the word ONE appears on the reverse of a U.S. $1 bill

This week's challenge
A customer pays for $13.59 worth of groceries with a $50 bill. The cashier counts out the change, then remarks, "Huh, that's interesting." The customer, upon receiving the change, replies, "You're right. That is interesting." So, what's so interesting?
Answers

On-air questions
1. Denver (the Denver Mint is the largest single producer of coins in the world)
2. The Declaration of Independence (this design was introduced for the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976)
3. Copper
4. Martha Washington (on silver certificates issued in the late 1800s)
5. Ten (a "Hamilton" is a $10 bill and a "Benjamin" is a $100 bill)

Extra credit
1. "Cents" (many of these coins were gold plated in an attempt to pass them off as $5 gold coins)
2. Six (in each corner, on the bottom in the phrase ONE DOLLAR, and in the center of the bill)

This week's challenge
A customer pays for $13.59 worth of groceries with a $50 bill. The cashier counts out the change, then remarks, "Huh, that's interesting." The customer, upon receiving the change, replies, "You're right. That is interesting." So, what's so interesting?

 

 

Answers

On-air questions
1. Denver (the Denver Mint is the largest single producer of coins in the world)
2. The Declaration of Independence (this design was introduced for the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976)
3. Copper
4. Martha Washington (on silver certificates issued in the late 1800s)
5. Ten (a "Hamilton" is a $10 bill and a "Benjamin" is a $100 bill)

Extra credit
1. "Cents" (many of these coins were gold plated in an attempt to pass them off as $5 gold coins)
2. Six (in each corner, on the bottom in the phrase ONE DOLLAR, and in the center of the bill)

 

 

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