The Best of Our Knowledge
5:28 pm
Mon February 1, 2010

The Best of Our Knowledge # 1011

Albany, NY – HAND HELD SOFTWARE FOR THE SPECIAL NEEDS COMMUNITY OPENS WORLD OF NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

"IPROMPTS: DISABILITY APPLICATIONS TO GO"

Now, for an update on a story we told you about last fall here on The Best of Our Knowledge. It's about Handhold Adaptive, the developer of mobile software supporting those with special needs, and their caregivers.

Last year, Handhold introduced iPrompts, a customizable picture-based communications tool for the iPhone and iPod Touch. We talked about how this can provide visual structure for people with language and behavioral challenges - including autism, Down syndrome, and ADHD.

Today, we look at new possibilities of expanding iPrompts uses to applications like returning military personnel with traumatic brain injuries, or for doctors to use with Alzheimer patients. Plus, its data tracking capabilities hold potential for enhancing disability research.

iPrompts allows special educators, therapists, and parents to present a variety of graphical prompts that help special needs individuals' transition from one activity to the next, understand upcoming events, communicate their needs, and focus on the task at hand.

By pulling from a library of several hundred stock photos and illustration, loading pictures from any personal computer, or adding pictures "on the fly" by using the iPhone's built in camera - caregivers create and present picture-based schedules of events, countdown timers portraying a period of time until a pictured activity begins, or choice prompts between two images.

TBOOK speaks with the Founder and CEO of Handhold Adaptive, Dan Tedesco.

Glenn Busby reports. (9:13)

**(Attention listeners and program directors who may get questions. The website
mentioned at the conclusion of the above story is: www.handholdadaptive.com
Or, you can download and view the iPrompts application right at your iTunes app
store.)**

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH IN DISABILITIES EDUCATION PROGRAM

"ACCESS TO ADVANCEMENT: AN AUDIO EXPLORATION OF THE NATIONAL EFFORT TO INCREASE THE ROLE OF WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS"

Access to Careers Profile: Jennifer

Our next guest, Jennifer, initially, did not consider her health problems to be a disability even though they did interrupt her college plans. But once she realized that accommodations could help her achieve her career goal a goal she discovered because of her own brain surgery her academic goals persistently moved forward with unstoppable determination.

The Best of Our Knowledge spoke with Jennifer about what she's learned and what she believes her own experiences can teach others.

Allison Dunne reports. (8:29)

If you would like to hear this story again, or other similar stories in our exclusive radio series, and view relevant websites and data, visit WAMC's Women in Science website, www.womeninscience.org, and click on "Access to Advancement." You'll also find links to our Facebook page and many related topics...along with an opportunity for you to join in the discussion.

"Access to Advancement" is supported by the National Science Foundation Research in Disabilities Education Program.

We also invite you to view photos, access resources, and chat with others who are interested in women, disability, and STEM issues by joining our Women in Science Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=60729571543&ref=ts

And you can receive updates on the availability of new stories on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/AccesstoAdvance

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this story, are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation.

 

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