The Best of Our Knowledge
1:50 am
Mon January 23, 2006

The Best of Our Knowledge #801

Albany, NY –
THE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION ACT
CELEBRATES ITS 30TH ANNIVERSARY, PT. 2 OF 2 -
About 13% of the school population in the United States, nearly
7-million children, benefit from IDEA, or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. On this 30th anniversary TBOOK wanted to see if this
program is performing up to its 12-billion dollar price tag. Last week,
we found out about the history of IDEA, the original issue of access
which prompted the act, and the reauthorization in 2004 which now
links IDEA to many of the same goals as No Child Left Behind. This
week, we find out how much money is spent on special education,
and look at studies to see if those dollars are really paying off.
TBOOK spoke with John Hager, Assistant Secretary for the Office
of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services in Washington
about these issues and also discovered that Hager himself was a
victim of polio at the age of 34 and has been in a wheelchair ever since.
Glenn Busby reports. (8:30)

(MUSIC BRIDGE)

CONNECTICUT'S NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND LAWSUIT, PT. 3 OF 3
UNFUNDED MANDATES -
One of the main thrusts of the No Child Left Behind Law is to narrow
the education gap between the rich and poor in America. Connecticut
is particularly interesting in this regard because, while Connecticut
boasts a high graduation rate, it also has one of the widest academic achievement gaps in the U.S. Connecticut has charged, as have other
states, that the federal government has not fully funded all of the
mandates in No Child Left Behind...such as more money for the
increased testing requirements. And so last year, Connecticut filed a
lawsuit against NCLB. On the other hand, the U.S. Department of
Education cites figures like a 34% increase in total NCLB funding
(from 17.4 billion in 2001 to 23.3 billion this year, 2006). Over the
past couple of weeks, we've explored testing requirements and special education. This week, Connecticut claims, to complete its required
testing, it needs another 8-million dollars. And we'll also find out this
week about Connecticut's success, or lack thereof, without NCLB.
TBOOK spoke with Betty Sternberg, Connecticut Education
Commissioner and attorney Sandy Kress who served as President
Bush's Chief Education Advisor, and presided over passage of
No Child Left Behind.
Jim Horne reports. (9:52)

(SHOW THEME)

SHOW CLOSE - Dr. Karen Hitchcock and Glenn Busby (1:30)