The Best of Our Knowledge
6:11 am
Mon January 30, 2006

The Best of Our Knowledge #802

Albany, NY –
WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND SPACE/JULIE PAYETTE, PT. 1 OF 2 -
While the U.S. often grabs the headlines when it comes to news
about space, many other countries, including Canada, are very
much involved in every aspect of space research and exploration.
Regular listeners of this program will be familiar with our National
Science Foundation series of stories highlighting the advances
women are making in science, technology, engineering, and math.
We found another wonderful example of that, and want to share this
profile with our audience. Julie Payette is the Chief Astronaut for
the Canadian Space Agency, and is already a veteran of one space
shuttle mission. She is a perfect role model for anyone listening
who ever considered being an astronaut. Julie Payette was born in
Montreal. She's earned multiple degrees in electrical engineering
and computer sciences. She's a member of the Natural Sciences
and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Payette is the winner
of numerous awards, including an honorary degree from Queen's
University in Kingston, Ontario. Julie has a commercial pilot's license,
and enjoys many sports including running, skiing and scuba diving.
This multi-talented astronaut even plays the piano and sings.
TBOOK recently had a rare opportunity to have this conversation with
her about her academic career and astronaut training.
Dr. Karen Hitchcock reports. (10:04)

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ORIGINS OF LIFE/SCIENCE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION SERIES
THE MOON AND THE NEW PRESIDENTIAL VISION , PT. 1 OF 2 -
Every time you listen to the news, it seems there's another story
about space. Such as, a spacecraft that's been monitoring the world's
oceans, designed as a three year mission, was finally just turned off
(still working) more that 13-years after it began. The International
Space Station continues its voyage of scientific research. The Rovers
are still sending back important data from Mars after more than two
years. The Cassini spacecraft has several more years orbiting Saturn, discovering new information about its rings. And now, NASA's New
Horizons spacecraft is going even further. Its just started a 10-year
flight to visit the last planet we know about in the solar system, Pluto.
That mission is being operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied
Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. APL is where our next guest is
from. Dr. Paul Spudis is a planetary scientist who begins his tale by
explaining how he and his colleagues located water on the Moon, why
that's so important, and how the International Space Station will help
prepare for longer manned missions in space.
Glenn Busby reports. (8:01)

The preceding material is supported by the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration.

**(Attention Program Directors. For listeners interested in more
information about this story, or any of the other more than 120
stories featured in this exclusive radio series, or would like to hear
them again via their computer, the website mentioned at the
conclusion of the above segment is , then
click on Seminar Program.)**

 

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