The Best of Our Knowledge
3:17 am
Mon March 6, 2006

The Best of Our Knowledge # 807

Albany, NY – NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SERIES
POWERFUL SIGNALS: TRANSFORMING THE ROLE OF WOMEN AND GIRLS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
THE YOUNG WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP SCHOOL , Pt. 1 of 2 -
People outside of New York City are probably unaware of this
remarkable public school in East Harlem. It won last year's
prestigious Breakthrough School Award from the National
Association of Secondary School Principals for success working
with low income and minority students. It also won the Young
Science Achievers Award in 2004. This all girls public school is
66% Latina, and 33% African American. Among the many amazing statistics...The Young Women's Leadership School has been getting
100% of its senior girls into college every year. We just had to find
out what they're doing right. So TBOOK went to TYWLS in East
Harlem and this is their story in their own words.
Blue Chevigny reports. (12:55)

**(Attention Program Directors. For more details about this particular
school mentioned in the above story, the website given listeners is:
www.tywls.org.

Also, if listeners would like to hear more stories like this one from our
exclusive radio series, just visit our own special website: www.womeninscience.org.)**

(MUSIC BRIDGE)

PUSH TO KEEP GIRLS IN SCHOOL IN TURKEY -
In sharp contrast to the story we just heard, Turkey has a dismal
record when it comes to getting girls into school. A recent survey
showed that Turkey has the worst record in Europe and is ranked
even below developing countries like Syria. Numerous governments
have launched serious initiatives to improve attendance. But
economic and cultural factors have diminished those results.
However, this year there are many more girls in Turkish classrooms,
thanks to a new initiative backed by UNICEF and the World Bank.
TBOOK gets this report from rural South-East Turkey, where it's
estimated up to 40% of girls have never seen the inside of a classroom.
Euroquest's Dorian Jones reports. (3:50)

(MUSIC BRIDGE)

WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH / HYPATIA -
If you couldn't tell by now, this is Women's History Month. Interest
in International Women's Day was pretty low until the 1960s, when
the women's movement caused women to wonder why they were
infrequently in history books. A California school district started
Women's History Week in 1978 to promote the teaching of women's
history. It became so popular that in 1981 the U.S. Congress passed
a resolution making the week a celebration for the whole country.
Then in 1987, Congress declared the entire month of March National
Women's History Month. Actress, Kate Mulgrew (internationally known
for her role as Captain Kathryn Janeway in Star Trek Voyager ) provides
us this time capsule on Hypatia, who students can thank for making
math courses easier to understand.
Kate Mulgrew narrates. (1:59)