The Best of Our Knowledge
2:01 am
Mon July 10, 2006

The Best of Our Knowledge # 825

Albany, NY – THE INTENTIONAL LEADER , CHANCELLOR EMERITUS, KENNETH BUZZ SHAW, DISCUSSES HIS NEW TEACHING JOB AND CHANGES IN HIGHER EDUCATION -
Syracuse University is known by sports fans across the country
because of its high visibility with its basketball and football teams.
But Syracuse is also respected among academics. And all of this
is in large part because of Kenneth Buzz Shaw. Shaw has served
as a campus or system president for 27-years at Southern Illinois
University, the University of Wisconsin System, and now Syracuse
University, where he spent his last 13-years as chancellor. A recipient
of eight honorary degrees, Shaw is author of The Successful President
and numerous articles on leadership issues in higher education. Now,
at Syracuse, as Chancellor Emeritus and University Professor, he
teaches leadership classes and has a new book out called, The
Intentional Leader which opens this topic up for a general audience
as well. TBOOK asks Kenneth Shaw what compelled him to pen this
second book?
Glenn Busby reports. (8:49)

EDUCATION HEADLINES AND UPDATES -

- Just like Chancellor Shaw spoke about (the technological revolution on campus) in our opening story today, Professor Sally Brown from Leeds Metropolitan University, says many of the new generation of students
raised on the internet see nothing wrong with copying other people's work.

- Meanwhile, in our update segment, the University of Colorado's Chancellor
has announced that he's begun the process to fire Professor Ward Churchill
for research misconduct and plagiarism. Churchill's attorney says they will appeal to the Tenure Committee, and probably file a lawsuit.

- And last month we aired a story about Greening Schools. The University
of Florida has just received a gold rating from the U.S. Green Building
Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Its newest
building uses only half the energy of other buildings the same size.
Dr. Karen Hitchcock reports. (1:00)

ORIGINS OF LIFE/SCIENCE RESEARCH IN EDUCATION SERIES
THE MISSION TO REALLY EARLY EARTH: WHEN DID CONDITIONS APPROPRIATE FOR LIFE FIRST APPEAR ON EARTH? -
Hold the presses on printing future science textbooks. Our next guest
tells us about his research that could rewrite part of our planet's earliest
history. Scientists from Australia and the U.S. have found what they
describe as strong evidence for liquid water at or near the earth's surface
4.3 billion years ago. That research pushes back knowledge of the
presence of liquid water on earth some 400-million years, to nearly when
it's believed earth was born, about 4.5 billion years ago. This could mean
life began much sooner. To learn more about this exciting discovery,
TBOOK spoke with one of the lead research scientists. Dr. Mark Harrison
is Director of The Research School of Earth Science at the Australian
National University in Canberra, Australia.
Glenn Busby reports. (7:59)

The preceding material is supported by the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration.

**(Attention Program Directors. For listeners interested in more information
about this story, or any of the other more than 130 stories featured in this exclusive radio series, or would like to hear them again via their computer,
the website mentioned at the end of the above segment is
www.origins.rpi.edu, then click on Seminar Program.)**