The Best of Our Knowledge
10:34 am
Mon October 9, 2006

The Best of Our Knowledge # 838

Albany, NY – TO:STATION MANAGERS, PROGRAM DIRECTORS
FM:GLENN BUSBY, PRODUCER/CO-HOST
RE: THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE , TBOOK SHOW # 838
DT:WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11 2006

SENSATIONAL KIDS: HOPE AND HELP FOR CHILDREN WITH SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER , Pt. 2 of 2 -
Sensory Processing Disorder, or SPD, is a neurological disorder that
results from the brain's inability to integrate certain information received
from the body's five basic senses.
Dr. Lucy Jane Miller is the founder of the only comprehensive SPD
program nationwide. And she's the sole researcher to be awarded
National Institutes of Health grants to study this disorder.
Dr. Miller is the Founder and Executive Director of KID (Knowledge in Development) Foundation. The only full time program of SPD
research in the world.
She directs the STAR (Sensory Therapies and Research) Center
in Denver, Colorado where she treats children and adults.
Dr. Miller is also a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Rehabilitation
Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
She's the author of more than 60 articles in scientific/professional
journals and textbooks. And she's received more than 30 funded
awards and grants to continue her research into childhood disabilities.
Last week, we learned about the nearly 40-year history of SPD, the
politics of the medical community accepting this disorder, and results
of Dr. Miller's early research.
This week, we find out about the four major subgroups of Sensory
Processing Disorder, their respective treatments, costs, and the
impact on education.
Dr. Miller takes TBOOK into the homes, classrooms, and communities
of children with SPD.
Glenn Busby reports. (12:07)

**(Attention Program Directors. The website mentioned at the conclusion
of the above story for those listeners who would like to read more about
Dr. Miller's work is: www.starcenter.us)**

EDUCATION HEADLINES AND UPDATES -

ONTARIO PLANS TO DOUBLE GRADUATE ENROLLMENT -
The Canadian government in Ontario plans to spend some 240-million
dollars to double the enrollment in graduate schools. It hopes to attract
and keep graduate students in Ontario to help drive the economy.

OECD REPORT - The Organization for Economic Cooperation and
Development just released its annual report of 30 democracy-based
countries. The U.S. ranks first in the proportion of its adult population considered highly educated. But among younger people, other countries
are catching up. In lower age groups, the U.S. ranks seventh.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY - A separate but similar
report shows the U.S. is beginning to slip from its status as a world
leader in higher education on a number of measures. This study was
done by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education,
based in California.

COUNCIL OF GRADUATE SCHOOLS - Their annual report on graduate enrollment and degrees is just out. Major findings include: total enrollment
up by 2%, driven by increases of 3% for women and 6% for African
Americans. First-time Hispanic enrollment was up by 10% as well.
Dr. Karen Hitchcock and Glenn Busby report. (3:00)

ESSAY: DAY ONE -
With the new Fall term now well underway, students can reflect back
on their first day of school. Many of us also often think about teachers
that most influenced our lives. Martha Holmes is a writer from New
York's Hudson Valley. She presents her own memories in her
personal essay called, Day One.
Martha Holmes remarks. (4:02)