The Best of Our Knowledge
4:29 am
Mon November 13, 2006

The Best of Our Knowledge # 843

Albany, NY – PROFESSOR LOOKS AT CORE OF SUN THROUGH THE
SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY, Pt. 2 of 2 -
Science from a hole in the ground? Well...it all began nearly 2-billion
years ago, when geologists believe a meteorite struck the earth,
creating what is now the Sudbury Basin in Canada. The impact
allowed a rich seam of nickel-copper ore to rise through the earth's
crust. Today, the Sudbury Basin is circled with the world's largest
concentration of nickel mines, and in one of them, scientists accompany
miners on their morning descent to 68-hundred feet below the surface.
Last week, The Best of Our Knowledge's, Karen Hitchcock, learned
about the construction and size of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory,
and why scientists are interested in neutrinos. Neutrinos are very tiny
particles which make up everything in the universe. This week, Karen
finds out about current research results, how those findings impact the
way we look at our universe and the laws of physics. Plus, what
students are gaining from these investigations. Karen Hitchcock talks
with Dr. Art McDonald, Director of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.
Dr. McDonald is also University Research Chair, and Professor at
Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Dr. Karen Hitchcock reports. (12:53)

**(Attention Program Directors. For more information about the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, go to their website: www.sno.phy.queensu.ca)**

GUEST COMMENTARY:
KEEP SCIENCE EDUCATION IN CONTEXT OF THINGS THAT MATTER -
As regular listeners of The Best of Our Knowledge know, we often focus
on the importance of science literacy. We broadcast stories like the one
just heard. And our Origins of Life - Science Research in Education series
has been a fixture of the show for many years, as has our National Science Foundation series supporting women in science, technology engineering
and math, STEM. As we hear in our guest commentary today, the number
of vacant seats in many college classrooms devoted to STEM degrees,
serves as a reminder of the challenge to improve science education.
William David Burns is Executive Director of the National Center for Science
and Civic Engagement and Professor at the Harrisburg University of Science
and Technology in Pennsylvania. His comments focus putting science
education in a context to help boost interest.
Wm. David Burns comments. (5:08)

**(Attention Program Directors. The website given after the above
commentary for listeners interested in learning more about this new
university which just opened up, is .)**

**(Also Attention All TBOOK Listeners. The complete CD Set of our
newest National Science Foundation series, Powerful Signals , is just
out and available for dissemination. It's available for free while supplies
last by going to our dedicated website: and completing a simple form.)**