The Best of Our Knowledge
1:21 pm
Mon June 15, 2009

The Best of Our Knowledge # 978

Albany, NY – K-16 FISCAL YEAR 2010 EDUCATION BUDGET CUTS AND SPENDING -

The U.S. Department of Education's fiscal year 2010 budget proposes nearly 50-billion dollars in spending, plus half a billion in cuts.

Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, and other department of education officials discussed the administration's education budget recently during a conference call with reporters.

TBOOK also spoke with Carmel Martin, Assistant Secretary Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development and Bob Shireman, Deputy Undersecretary of Education.

Topics included cuts to at least 12 programs and positions, the controversial expiration of 85-million dollars a year in funding for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and deleting the DC Voucher Scholarship Program.

Glenn Busby reports. (8:23)

*(Attention Listeners and Program Directors. For additional information on the new education budget, proposed budget cuts, and to read a transcript of the above conference call, just go to the Department of Education's own website at: www.ed.gov.)*

EXAMPLES OF ECONOMIC IMPACT ON STATE AND LOCAL EDUCATION BUDGETS -

While we just heard from Secretary Duncan on the national picture, most states around the country are spending this summer looking for ways to balance their budgets.

We found several examples of how the nation's fiscal woes are impacting state and local school districts. One, is how Connecticut's education system is running on deficits and facing significant cut backs.

The President of the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education, Cal Hemmingway, says state and federally mandated programming that local towns have to pay for, is a major issue that's hurting school boards.

Hemmingway explains to TBOOK how the present dilemma is unfolding.

Charlie Deitz reports. (6:17)

FRENCH TEACHERS AND STUDENTS PROTEST PLANNED UNIVERSITY REFORMS FOR TEACHER TRAINING -

The U.S. is not the only country that's having economic and education reform issues. Recently, teachers and students in France protested against planned university reforms to reduce the amount of time new instructors get to practice teaching.

Aiden O'Donnell reports from Paris. (3:30)

EDUCATION HEADLINES AND UPDATES -

Since we've been talking in this show about higher education and schooling costs, a word now about the new GI Bill that takes effect August 1st.

When the Department of Veterans Affairs opened online registration last month, the system crashed from so many people trying to log on. Tens of thousands of veterans are signing up for the benefits, which pay 100% of in-state college tuition, housing, and some other expenses. The price tag for taxpayers is expected to amount to as much as 62-billion dollars over the next decade.

And in a college admissions update predictions of impact due to the national economy may be premature. In this snapshot from around the country, we're hearing comments like: "more deposits than anticipated we expect to meet our enrollment target realized our goal for the entering class and numbers turned out to be on par with previous years." We'll check again in the fall.

Glenn Busby reports. (1:05)