The Best of Our Knowledge
11:46 am
Mon August 31, 2009

The Best of Our Knowledge # 989

Albany, NY –
"WHAT TO READ WHEN: THE BOOKS AND STORIES TO READ WITH YOUR CHILD - - AND ALL THE BEST TIMES TO READ THEM"
Pt. 1 - THE STATE OF LITERACY IN TODAY'S WORLD -

Well, vacation is nearly over and students are heading back to school. TBOOK hopes students have been brushing up on their reading skills over the summer. But we wanted to provide some tips for boosting reading skills for this new school year.

Children's books are produced in abundance. Partly because of that, their shelf life is often not as long as adult books. That can pose a problem for parents when it comes to young readers looking for literature themselves, and in getting young readers excited about the stories and books they're given.

To learn more about the state of literacy today, we turned to a leading authority in children's literature and education. Pam Allyn is Founder and Executive Director of LitLife, an internationally recognized organization that trains hundreds of K thru 12 teachers each year. Allyn founded Books for Boys, an award-winning mentoring and reading initiative at The Children's Village. She's also the recipient of two James Patterson PageTurner Awards for excellence in bringing literacy to underserved populations.

Glenn Busby reports. (11:40)

**(Attention listeners. Pam Allyn is the author of "What To Read When", published by Avery, a member of the Penguin Group. More online at www.whattoreadwhen.com

For more information on the national literacy advocacy group, LitLife, their website is: www.litlifeinfo.com.)**

MORE THAN AN ENGLISH TEACHER
THE STORY OF KENYAN BORN TEACHER, WINFRED KIUNGA -

The guest in our previous story talked about working with teachers and students in Kenya. Our next guest, Winnie Kiunga, was born in Kenya and became a teacher in the capital city of Nairobi.

Kenya is in East Africa, lying along the Indian Ocean, right on the equator. Kenya is nearly as large as Texas or France and has rapidly grown to nearly 38-million people. The official languages are Swahili and English.

Early on, Kiunga knew she wanted to help others improve their lives. So she became an English teacher, working in the refugee camps. Winnie Kiunga tells TBOOK in her own words, what it was like to work with the refugee students.

Report produced by Eloise Melzer. (7:17)

**(Attention listeners. You can read more about Winnie Kiunga online at:
www.worldvisionreport.org,)**

 

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