The Best of Our Knowledge
1:21 pm
Mon October 26, 2009

The Best of Our Knowledge # 997

Albany, NY – NATIONAL DISABILITIES EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH

JEWISH GUILD FOR THE BLIND SCHOOL: MUSIC THERAPY CLASSES -

The Jewish Guild for the Blind has been serving blind, visually impaired, and multi-disabled children and adults for nearly 100-years.

Thousands of people are helped each year through a wide range of programs and services designed especially to enhance their physical, emotional, and intellectual functioning.

The Guild provides these rehabilitation therapies, education programs, adaptive skills, and job training programs to help the visually impaired gain independence.

TBOOK visited the Music Therapy Program at the Jewish Guild for the Blind School in New York City and spoke with Rhonda Defiore, Guild Music Therapist, and two of her students. They are 11-year old Elijah Jackson from Manhattan, and 13-year old Valerie Liranzo from Queens.

Glenn Busby reports. (10:49)

**(Listeners please note. For more information about the work done by the Jewish Guild for the Blind, visit their website at: www.jgb.org )**

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH IN DISABILITIES EDUCATION PROGRAM SERIES

"ACCESS TO ADVANCEMENT: AN AUDIO EXPLORATION OF THE NATIONAL EFFORT TO INCREASE THE ROLE OF WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS"

ACCESS TO CAREERS PROFILE: PATRICIA WALSH -

Patricia Walsh has a full-time career at Microsoft as a Program Manager, runs marathons, volunteers extensively, and still has time for socializing.

When Walsh started college, it wasn't easy. Things were pretty rough early on. But then, the combination of a role model, and a chance meeting with a complete stranger, helped boost her confidence and guide her towards the success she's enjoying today.

Before Microsoft, Patricia Walsh worked with Dr. John Gardner, a renowned physicist who's also well known for his work with accessible technology specifically for making science, math, and engineering information accessible to people who are blind, or visually impaired. She says he was the critical mentor she needed.

Allison Dunne reports. (7:54)

If you would like to hear this story again, or other similar stories in our exclusive
radio series, visit our Women in Science website, www.womeninscience.org, and
click on the "Access to Advancement" button. You'll also find links to our
Facebook page and many related topics.

If you would like more information on the DO-IT program featured, you can visit: http://www.washington.edu/doit

And if you would like to read the research report, AccessSTEM/AccessComputing/DO-IT Longitudinal Transition Study mentioned in the preceding story, visit: http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/tracking2.html

We also invite you to view photos, access resources, and chat with others who are interested in women, disability, and STEM issues by joining our Women in Science Facebook group:
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=60729571543&ref=ts

And you can receive updates on the availability of new stories on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/AccesstoAdvance

"Access to Advancement" is supported by the National Science Foundation
Research in Disability Education Program. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or
recommendations expressed in this story, are those of the authors, and do not
necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation.

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