Meals And Music Mark MLK Day

Jan 20, 2014

More than 50 people came to First United Methodist Church of Pittsfield for a community meal on Monday, honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
More than 50 people came to First United Methodist Church of Pittsfield for a community meal on Monday, honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

People across the country are taking part in a national day of service to mark Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

More than 50 people came out for a meal and some entertainment at First United Methodist Church in Pittsfield Monday afternoon. Nine year-old Gavin Trautman was busy running around handing out food and drinks.

“We had a lot of people first of all,” Gavin said. “We brought everyone ziti pasta, soup and salad. Then we had to clean it all up. Let’s just say it was a lot of work, yet a lot of people were happy today. That’s what matters.”

Gavin did forget to mention that there were chocolate chip cookies as well. Gavin was joined by his brother Ethan and more than 20 other volunteers from Berkshire Community College. Beverly Stone enjoyed the meal and music with her son and grandson.

“I think it’s fantastic,” Stone said. “It really is. It brought a lot of people in. It celebrated a great man and the food was delicious.”

Stone’s 8-year-old grandson Isaiah Daniels walked away with a full belly and a sports-themed scarf, one of many made by children from the Trinity Episcopal Church in Lenox.

“How do you like your scarf?” I asked Isaiah.

“It’s okay,” answered Isaiah with the scarf wrapped around him.

The meal was prepared and paid for by the volunteers from BCC. BCC student Maddy Mahoney says celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a national day of service keeps the late civil rights activist's spirit alive.

“It just feels really good,” Mahoney said. “It’s heartwarming to be able to do that kind of stuff for other people. For most of my life I’ve always had food on the table. I’ve never had an issue with that. So to give back to people who’s basic needs are not met. That’s really important; to have everyone’s basic needs met.”

While Gavin Trautman seemed pretty tuckered out after finishing his day as a waiter and bus boy, he was the furthest thing from bitter – especially for a fourth grader who worked on his day off from school.

“Well its better than just sitting around on the couch all day,” said Gavin.