New England News
6:30 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Workshops Planned to Train Volunteers to Spot Aquatic Invasive Species

APIPP's training will provide instruction on how to identify and detect aquatic invasive animals, such as spiny waterflea, an aquatic invasive species known in at least five Adirondack waterways, including Lake George. Spiny waterflea congregates in masses, is a voracious feeder of zooplankton, and globs onto fishing lines. (Photo courtesy Emily DeBolt, Lake George Association)
APIPP's training will provide instruction on how to identify and detect aquatic invasive animals, such as spiny waterflea, an aquatic invasive species known in at least five Adirondack waterways, including Lake George. Spiny waterflea congregates in masses, is a voracious feeder of zooplankton, and globs onto fishing lines. (Photo courtesy Emily DeBolt, Lake George Association)
Credit Emily DeBolt/Lake George Association

Groups working to control the spread of aquatic invasive species in New York and Vermont are planning training sessions to identify the animals in hopes of protecting the region’s waters.



The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program will host an aquatic invasive animal identification training session on August 1st. Aquatic Invasive Species Project Coordinator Meghan Johnstone says they have held invasive plant training for about 11 years, but it’s only recently that invasive animals have become problematic.

Training will include techniques on how to identify specific species, species’ characteristics, and where they tend to colonize. Johnstone says if volunteers are able to spot suspicious species in the region’s numerous lakes, experts will be contacted quicker to coordinate spread prevention.

The APIPP workshop at Paul Smith’s College will be led by Lake Champlain Sea Grant Program Aquatic Resources Specialist Mark Malchoff.

In Vermont, a workshop on aquatic invasive biology, identification, spread prevention and survey techniques will be held on August 2nd at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock. The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Invasive Patrollers is a volunteer program to monitor the more than 800 lakes and ponds in the state. Volunteer Monitoring Coordinator Bethany Sargent notes that this workshop focuses on aquatic invasive plants.

For more information and to register for the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program aquatic invasive animal identification training session:
Please RSVP by July 25th to Meghan Johnstone at mjohnstone@tnc.org or (518)576-2082 x119. The training is free but space is limited.

Information on the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s workshop on aquatic invasives to be held on August 2nd at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock:
 http://www.watershedmanagement.vt.gov/lakes/htm/ans/lp_VIP.htm or contact Bethany Sargent at (802) 490-6129 or bethany.sargent@state.vt.us. Space is limited and the deadline to register is Monday, July 29th.
                                                                 

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