51%

Wednesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8pm - 8:30pm

In America, women make up more than half the population. Worldwide, women are expected to outnumber men within the next fifty years - and every issue we face is one that affects us all. 

Whether it's the environment, health, our children, politics or the arts, there's a women's perspective, and 51% is a show dedicated to that viewpoint. 

Host Allison Dunne talks to experts in their field for a wide-ranging, entertaining discussion of issues that not only fall into the traditional 'women's issues' category, but topics that concern us all as human beings and citizens of the global community.

Tune to 51% weekly throughout the U. S. on public and community radio stations, some ABC Radio Network stations, Armed Forces Radio stations around the world and on the internet. 

51% Show #1358

Jul 31, 2015

On this week’s 51%, we hear about a book on First Ladies. Then, three young women head off for military life and we hear from a lawyer who says the U.S. criminal justice system is broken.

51% Show #1357

Jul 24, 2015
Leo Hidalgo / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ileohidalgo/

On this week’s 51%, a psychotherapist talks about healing and self-love, a Nobel laureate marks her birthday by opening a school for girls, and an essay on storytelling after the shooting at a Charleston church.

51% Show #1356

Jul 17, 2015
Jeremy Dalmas

On this week’s 51%, New York is home to new legislation combating sexual assault on college campuses; a woman talks about companies that hire workers with disabilities, a female comedian says there's more than just humor in her Disabilities Act; and a young woman provides art therapy to marginalized kids in Portugal.

51% Show #1355

Jul 10, 2015

On this week’s 51%, we explore choices in a lifetime. First we'll hear from an author who wants to change the approach to exercise. Then we meet a woman honored with being her town's oldest resident followed by a teenager  who wants the right to make her own medical decisions.

51% Show #1354

Jul 3, 2015

On this week’s 51%, we'll hear about two famous cousins in the Roosevelt family who took on public, powerful roles for women at the time;  and a woman honors patients who died at a mental institution and a man in Nigeria ditches Barbie dolls for African queens.

51% Show #1353

Jun 26, 2015

On this week’s 51%, a sports psychologist talks about female athletes; a star basketball player gets to have a baby and her game. Plus, a writer returns to her roots.

Sisterhood in Sports:  How Female Athletes Collaborate and Compete is a book by clinical and sports psychologist Dr. Joan Steidinger, herself a highly accomplished athlete. It illuminates how the female brain works differently from that of men; how women achieve at the same high level as men, but relate to others within their sport in their own way.  

51% Show #1352

Jun 19, 2015

On this week’s 51%, we'll meet a firearms instructor who works to enroll women in shooting classes. Then, a church official talks about helping widows in Nigeria. And a woman tells a story about her grandmother's choices in partners.

51% Show #1351

Jun 12, 2015

On this week’s 51%, a woman talks about her non-profit group helping young people released from prison. We'll also hear about a women's prison book project, and a daughter shares her experience of loving and letting go of her father.

In New York City a food truck with a purpose takes a chance on young people fresh out of jail. It’s a way for the previously incarcerated youth to integrate back into society by earning paychecks and getting work experience. Pierre Bienaimé has this Deutsche Welle Generation Change report. 

51% Show #1350

Jun 5, 2015

On this week’s 51%, women and children freed from Boko Haram face difficult times returning home; human rights activist and author Rafia Zakaria talks about unheard female voices in Pakistan; and a woman finds comfort in a veterans comedy boot camp.

51% Show #1349

May 29, 2015

On this week’s 51%, there’s a new site focusing on gender dynamics in the 2016 presidential race. Plus, a teen reporter equates a pop star with feminism; and young girls guess at what their future careers might be.

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