The Academic Minute

Weekdays, 7:34am and 3:56pm

The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy.

Hosted by Dr. Lynn Pasquerella, President of Mount Holyoke College, The Academic Minute features a different professor each day, drawing experts from top research institutions. You'll enjoy updates on groundbreaking scientific research, an explanation of the accidental discovery of chocolate and an analysis of how social media is transforming the workplace, to name a few.

The Academic Minute airs each weekday at 7:34 a.m and 3:56 p.m.  You can also stay connected by following us on Twitter and liking us on Facebook.

If you have a pitch for a segment, or any questions or comments about the segment, please e-mail us.

The Academic Minute opens with a selection by WAMC contributor and renowned cellist Yehuda Hanani, who appears on Classical Music According to Yehuda during WAMC's Roundtable program. The piece is Bach's Suite No. 2 in D Minor.

Production support for The Academic Minute comes from Newman's Own, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and from Mount Holyoke College.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Dr. Joe MacGregor, The University of Texas at Austin – Fracturing of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Joe MacGregor of the University of Texas at Austin explains the mechanics of the fracturing currently plaguing the ice sheet of Antarctica.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Tue July 17, 2012

Dr. Carl Rubino, Hamilton College – Star Wars and Mythology

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Carl Rubino of Hamilton College explains why the Star Wars series is attracting a whole new generation of fans.

Carl Rubino is the Winslow Professor of Classics at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where his teaching and research interests include ancient Greek and Roman literature, comparative literature and literary theory.  In 2011 he published the article, Long Ago, But Not So Far Away: Another Look at Star Wars and the Ancient World. He holds a Ph.D. from the University at Buffalo.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Dr. Susan Levine, University of Chicago – Puzzles and Cognitive Development

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Susan Levine of the University of Chicago reveals the long-term advantages of playing with puzzles at an early age.

Susan Levine is a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago where she also serves as chair of the developmental psychology program. Her research lab examines how variations in home and school input affect the cognitive development of children, including language, spatial and mathematical skills. She holds a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Fri July 13, 2012

Dr. Amélie Quesnel-Vallée, McGill University – Depression and Education Level

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Amélie Quesnel-Vallée of McGill University reveals the multigenerational advantages of a college degree.

Amélie Quesnel-Vallée is an associate professor at McGill University where she has a joint appointment in the Departments of Sociology and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health. Her research examines how social policies influence the development of social inequalities in health. Her work has been featured in a number of peer-reviewed journals and she holds a Ph.D. from Duke University.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Dr. Patricia Anderson, Dartmouth College – School Budgets and Childhood Obesity

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Patricia Anderson of Dartmouth College reveals how efforts to improve academic performance have contributed to the obesity epidemic.

Patty Anderson is a professor of economics at Dartmouth College where her most recent research is focused on the economic factors behind the growing obesity problem in the United States. She is also affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Co-editor of the Journal of Human Resources. She earned her Ph.D. at Princeton University.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Dr. Ilaria Pascucci, University of Arizona – Rules of Planetary Placement

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Ilaria Pascucci of the University of Arizona explains the rules that govern the messy process of solar system formation.

Ilaria Pascucci is an assistant professor of planetary sciences at the University of Arizona where her current research is focused on various aspects of solar system formation. More specifically, she is examining the dispersal of pre-planetary material around young stars. Her work has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals and she holds a Ph.D. from the Max Plank Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Dr. Cynthia Ebinger, University of Rochester – Understanding Volcanic Plumbing

In today’s Academic Minute, Cynthia Ebinger of the University of Rochester explains the connection between earthquakes, volcanism, and the changing thickness of the Earth’s tectonic plates.

Cynthia Ebinger is a Professor of Geophysics at the University of Rochester where her research is focused on active and ancient plate boundary processes, with a primary interest in the process of continental rifting leading to rupture and the formation of new oceanic lithosphere. She is currently studying rift systems in Ethiopia, Tanzania, the Gulf of Aden, and southern Australia.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Dr. Gregory Wilson, University of Washington – Success of Early Mammals

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Greg Wilson of the University of Washington reveals how a slight change in tooth shape allowed early mammals to compete in a world dominated by dinosaurs.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Dr. Nicholas Sarantakes, U.S. Naval War College – The Olympics and International Relations

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Nicholas Sarantakes of the U.S. Naval War College examines how tense international relations have regularly spilled over into the Olympic arena.

Nicholas Sarantakes is an associate professor of strategy and policy at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. As a diplomatic historian, his research interests focus on the World War II and Cold War eras, and the Asia/Pacific region. In 2009 he published, Dropping the Torch: Jimmy Carter, the Olympic Boycott, and the Cold War. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Southern California.

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Academic Minute
5:00 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Dr. Kurt Rotthoff, Seton Hall University – Economic Impact of Sports Arenas

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Kurt Rotthoff of Seton Hall University tests claims about the economic  benefit of investing in large sports arenas and stadiums.

Kurt Rotthoff is an assistant professor of economics and finance at Seton Hall University where he teaches classes in economics and sports finance. His work has been published in numerous academic journals and he holds a Ph.D. from Clemson University.

About Dr. Rotthoff

Dr. Kurt Rotthoff – Economic Impact of Sports Arenas

 

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