All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm

All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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New England News
10:50 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Supporters Of Closed School For Deaf Not Giving Up

Holton Hall of the Austine School for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Brattleboro, Vermont
Credit Kappclark/Wikimedia Public Domain

The Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing has closed, but supporters and alumni haven't given up on it.

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New England News
9:15 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Tiny College Launches $2M Fundraising Challenge

Credit Sterling College/Flickr

A tiny Vermont college that focuses on environmental stewardship is launching a $2 million fundraising challenge.

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New England News
8:30 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Vermont Rail Upgrade Grant Rejected By Feds

Credit Tipiac-Alain Caraco/Wikimedia Commons

Vermont Transportation Agency officials say a federal grant application that would have been used to upgrade the rails in an 11-mile stretch between Rutland and Burlington was rejected by federal transportation officials.

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New England News
7:45 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

FTC Asked To Consider Utility's Renewable Claims

Credit Green Mountain Power

The Federal Trade Commission is being asked to determine if Vermont's largest electric utility is making deceptive claims about the renewable energy it produces.

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Business
5:11 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

With Turmoil Roiling Abroad, Why Aren't Oil Prices Bubbling Up?

A soldier guards a pipe en route to the Kawergosk Refinery near Irbil, the capital of the autonomous Kurdish region of northern Iraq, in July. Fighting in northern Iraq forced the closure of the country's largest oil refinery, Baiji, and cut production from the Kirkuk oil field this summer.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:49 pm

The price of oil has been falling — a drop that you may already have noticed at the pump. Gasoline prices have dropped noticeably since June, and oil is now well below $100 a barrel.

That decline has happened even as conflicts have flared in or near oil-producing regions. Normally, oil prices are expected to spike higher amid turmoil — so why have they been trending lower?

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Around the Nation
4:57 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Medals Of Honor Recognize Harrowing Battle And A Dying Act

Army Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins receives the Medal of Honor during a ceremony at the White House. He describes the battle that earned him the medal as the toughest he saw in three tours of duty in Vietnam.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:39 pm

President Obama on Monday awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor, to two soldiers who served in Vietnam: Army Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie Adkins, who survived a harrowing battle and 18 body wounds; and Army Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat, whose dying act saved his fellow soldiers.

In January 1970, President Obama said Monday, Sloat was on patrol with his squad in Vietnam.

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Global Health
4:44 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

Medical workers at the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, Liberia, put on their protective suits before going to the high-risk area of the hospital, where Ebola patients are being treated, Sept. 3.
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:55 pm

Back in August, scientists reported that the Ebola virus is mutating during this epidemic.

When a virus spreads between people and reproduces, it copies its genetic code in a sloppy way. So there can be unpredictable changes.

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Parallels
4:43 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra performs in Baghdad. The concert was promoted by word of mouth to avoid being targeted by bombs.
Graham Smith NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 7:00 pm

It's a hot night in Baghdad, and the national theater is packed with people who are here to see the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.

They're fanning themselves with programs that show conductor Karim Wasfi, a striking man with thick eyebrows and a pointed beard, playing the cello. Tonight, he'll be conducting for the first time in more than a year.

Iraq has been in the headlines lately, with extremists taking over parts of the country, American airstrikes, the militias and the politics.

But the country was once a sophisticated center for learning and the arts.

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U.S.
4:22 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Like Adrian Peterson, Majority Of U.S. Parents Use Physical Discipline

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 5:11 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Trade Lingo
4:22 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

'Moths' And 'Cockroaches' A Lighting Designer's Greatest Pests

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 5:11 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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