All Things Considered

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All Things Considered is an NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Picture of marijuana plant
US Fish and Wildlife Service/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

Vermont Republican Governor Phil Scott says he expects to sign a bill before Monday that will legalize the recreational use of marijuana.

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A tablespoon of soil contains billions of microscopic organisms. Life on Earth, especially the growing of food, depends on these microbes, but scientists don't even have names for most of them, much less a description.

That's changing, slowly, thanks to researchers like Noah Fierer, at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Fierer think microbes have lived in obscurity for too long. "They do a lot of important things for us, directly or indirectly, and I hope they get the respect they deserve," he says.

prescription bottles
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

The Vermont Senate is considering a proposal to save money on prescription drugs by importing them from Canada, where many are sold for a fraction of the cost in the United States.

On Thursday, USA Gymnastics announced they will stop using the Karolyi Ranch — the site of many of the atrocities committed against Olympians by Larry Nassar, the team's former doctor. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to New York Times reporter, Juliet Macur about what happens next as Nassar faces sentencing hearings this week.

Timothy O'Connor Jr.
Atamaniuk Funeral Home

The first Democratic speaker of the Vermont House and the longtime town moderator for his hometown of Brattleboro has died at 81.

Canfield Award logo
Vermont Department of Libraries

The Vermont Board of Libraries has recommended that the name of a prominent Vermont author, activist and pioneering education supporter be removed from a children's book award program.

With the death of biologist Mathilde Krim on Monday, at the age of 91 at her home in New York, the world lost a pioneering scientist, activist and fundraiser in AIDS research. She is being widely praised this week for her clarity, compassion and leadership.

Amid the panic, confusion and discrimination of the HIV epidemic's earliest days, Krim stood out — using science and straight talk, in the 1980s and beyond, to dispel fear, stigma, and misinformation among politicians and the public.

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Vermont State Police have released the names of the officers involved in the shooting death of a robbery suspect on the grounds of the Montpelier High School on Tuesday.

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When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who has already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Edwin Hawkins' "Oh Happy Day" was an accidental hit. The song, a gospel-style rework of an 18th century hymn, starts with a jazzy drum beat and a kind of blues pop piano groove. Dorothy Morrison, who sings lead on the recording, remembers at first, the pop feel got a lukewarm reception from the church.

"At first the reaction was, 'Well, we're not sure,' " Morrison says.

The Secretary of Homeland Security testified Tuesday that she did not hear President Trump use a vulgarity in a meeting with lawmakers about immigration last week.

The president was widely reported to have used a disparaging word to describe African nations and wondered aloud why people from countries like Haiti were allowed to come to the United States.

Democrats are celebrating wins in the two biggest races on election night 2017. The party will hold the governors' offices in New Jersey and Virginia. The Virginia race was causing Democrats worry in the final days.

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Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center
Ken Gallager/Wikimedia

The fatal shooting of a patient at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center last fall has prompted changes to security at the hospital, as well as policies on employee communication, education and training.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Entomologists and tree experts say here may be an upside to the recent extended period of subzero weather in northern New England.

Consolidated Communications logo
Consolidated Communications

The company that bought FairPoint Communications is discarding the old name and making plans to upgrade the service of tens of thousands of customers in northern New England.

Dolores O'Riordan of the Irish rock band The Cranberries died on Monday at 46. The vocalist became internationally known in '90s with her band's hits such as "Linger," "Dreams" and "Zombie." Jim Sullivan a former, longtime music critic for The Boston Globe, remembers her life, music and legacy.

Don Garrant
SUNY Plattsburgh

A former Clinton County legislator and SUNY Plattsburgh College Council Chair has died.

Following the rapid melting and quick freeze late last week, authorities across the region are dealing with ice jams and related flooding.  Authorities in Plattsburgh spent Monday evacuating a low-lying area in the city near the Saranac River.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The stories of sexual assault and harassment that emerged last year seemed to touch every industry — Hollywood, hotels, restaurants, politics and news organizations, including this one. Many of those stories focused on what happened, but most didn't or couldn't get to the question of why: Why do some people, mainly men, sexually harass their colleagues?

Psychologist John Pryor has been thinking about this for more than three decades, and he has created a test in an effort to measure a person's tendency to harass someone. It's called the "Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale."

Last week, Oprah Winfrey's speech at the Golden Globes brought many in the audience to tears and to their feet. She was accepting an award for contributions to the world of entertainment, but the billionaire broadcaster and philanthropist decided to use her moment to tell the story of a far less celebrated woman: Recy Taylor.

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