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All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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The city of Erie, Pa., got snow for Christmas. That's not unusual for Erie, so Lora Ormsbee didn't think much of it.

LORA ORMSBEE: I had left yesterday morning to go to my aunt's around 9:30 and the roads were clear. Everything was fine.

But what do these constant teases mean for the presidency?

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There's a race on. The way to win is to eradicate a human disease. That's only been done once before - smallpox. This year, two diseases got tantalizingly close, but unexpected roadblocks have popped up. NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff reports.

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In East Africa, cities are filled with the sounds of motorcycles, buses and shouts from street vendors. But as NPR's Eyder Peralta reports, in Tanzania's largest city, the soundscape is dominated by something unexpected.

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This week, we're remembering some of the notable people who died in 2017 and Perry Wallace is one of them.

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PERRY WALLACE: I wasn't interested in being a pioneer or making history or doing any of that.

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Hot chocolate, spiced cider, mulled wine — chances are you've probably had one of these to warm up around the holidays.

For many Puerto Ricans, coquito is the go-to holiday favorite. It's a creamy, boozy rum punch that Puerto Ricans on the island and around the world mix up to sip and to share this time of year.

Think eggnog, but better — with coconut milk and lots of rum.

Three months after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico's grid, the lengthy repair has left thousands of people relying on generators for energy. Generators power homes, hospitals, stores — and, apparently, the musical imagination.

Singer Joseph Fonseca said he wrote a holiday merengue song inspired by the rumble of his generator.

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The History Of Gift Wrap

Dec 23, 2017

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Let's keep this conversation going now with David Brooks of The New York Times. David, welcome.

DAVID BROOKS, BYLINE: Thank you.

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At this time of year, bright red plants seem to pop out of nowhere, suddenly appearing in grocery stores, windowsills, your co-worker's cubicle.

DEVIN DOTSON: Today we're talking about poinsettia.

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Steven Spielberg's The Post is a story of journalists, government leaks, and a president who hates the press. It's about the publication of the Pentagon Papers in 1971, but there's a reason Spielberg rushed to tell the story now.

And he really did rush: The filmmaker has long talked about making a Pentagon Papers movie, but the 2016 election made him feel it had become urgent. He got the working script just weeks after the Inauguration, rounded up his high-powered cast, and leapt into production as if he were making a little indie flick on the fly.

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Scientists have now edited genes inside mice to prevent a form of inherited deafness.

While cautioning that much more research is needed, the scientists said they hope the technique might someday be used to prevent deafness in children born in families with a history of genetic hearing loss.

Before that could happen, however, extensive tests would be needed to determine whether the treatment is safe — and whether it would actually work in humans.

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At the White House this afternoon, President Trump celebrated the final passage of Republicans' massive tax legislation. He spoke surrounded by dozens of GOP lawmakers, basking in the glow of a major legislative victory.

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Why Is Egg The Only Nog?

Dec 20, 2017

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This holiday season, we're tracking down the origins of some favorite holiday traditions - today, eggnog. The egg part is obvious. Traditionally, there's raw eggs in the drink - but nog?

ALTON BROWN: Historians argue a great deal about why we call eggnog eggnog.

American museum-goers can now get a rare glimpse of a painting that's been called a masterpiece — but has spent most of its life in storage. When The Fulbright Triptych was first shown in 1975, its future looked bright, but it didn't work out that way. It's a massive work — nearly 14 feet wide — with near life-sized portraits of the artist, Simon Dinnerstein, and his family.

This week Trump judicial nominee Matthew Petersen withdrew his name, amid controversy. It was the third such withdrawal in 10 days. Even so, President Trump's record on filling judicial vacancies has far outdistanced his predecessors.

Trump, aided by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has won confirmation of 12 appeals court nominees. That's more than any president in his first year, and indeed, more than Presidents Obama and George W. Bush combined.

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