All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm

All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Vermont Senate Chamber
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Vermont Senate is set to take another look at a bill that would require the state's employers to provide workers with paid sick days after a close vote last week.

TDI New England

A proposal to lay a 1,000-megawatt power line from the Canadian border down Lake Champlain and then across Vermont to Ludlow is taking another big step forward.

If you watched Sunday's Super Bowl, how did you get it? Over cable? Rabbit ears? (Yes, those still work.) Or did you stream it online?

Law Books
Janet Lindenmuth/Flickr

The Vermont attorney general's office has dropped its criminal investigation into whether an environmental activist acted as a lawyer without a law license in her advocacy for critics of large-scale wind and solar power projects before state regulators.

The Gulf of Mexico is now open for commercial fish farming.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced last month that, for the first time in the U.S., companies can apply to set up fish farms in federal waters.

The idea is to compete with hard-to-regulate foreign imports. But opening the Gulf to aquaculture won't be cheap, and it could pose environmental problems.

The problems with high lead levels in Flint, Mich.'s water started in April 2014, when the city switched water sources and began drawing its supply from the Flint River. The new water was harder, and government officials allowed it to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

People tend to think of information overload as a fact of life in the 21st century. Lately, we've been asking whether it really has to be that way.

Beyoncé is one of a kind — the kind of star who can drop a surprise music video and see much of the Internet and social media instantly explode.

Pages