All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm

All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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Shots - Health News
5:14 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Political Fight Jeopardizes Medicaid In Mississippi

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican, opposes Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 7:11 pm

Medicaid and controversy seem inseparable in many states lately. For the most part, the wrangling is about a new wrinkle in Medicaid — the expansion of the health program for the poor and disabled under Obamacare.

Mississippi, though, is raising the stakes. Democrats and Republicans in the state are in a fight, and the outcome could threaten the very existence of the entire Medicaid program there.

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North Country News
9:45 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Legislators Ponder Future of Vermont Psychiatric Hospital

Credit Beyond My Ken/Wikimedia Commons

Vermont legislators are concerned about the future of the Brattleboro Retreat, which is working to correct violations that could jeopardize its federal funding and certification.

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National Security
7:23 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

U.S. Charges NSA Leaker Snowden With Espionage

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

NPR has learned that the U.S. Department of Justice has prepared the documents to formally charge Edward Snowden with espionage. Snowden is the former contractor who has publicized details of two U.S. surveillance programs through the British newspaper The Guardian. NPR's Carrie Johnson joins us now with the latest, and Carrie, everyone's been waiting for this shoe to drop. What do we know about the government's plans to proceed?

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Around the Nation
7:11 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

At Coney Island, The (Mermaid) Show Must Go On

The Mermaid Parade at Coney Island draws hundreds of thousands of revelers each June. After sustaining significant damage during Superstorm Sandy, the nonprofit that runs the parade was almost unable to host this year's event, scheduled for Saturday.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Not even Superstorm Sandy could keep the mermaids from coming back to Brooklyn.

The Mermaid Parade is a nautically themed and occasionally naughty parade that draws close to a million people to Coney Island, in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, each June. Sandy nearly drowned the organization that hosts the parade, but supporters donated more than $100,000 to get the parade back on its fins this year.

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Around the Nation
7:11 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Ghost Island Looms Large Among Displaced Inupiat Eskimos

King Island is only accessible via helicopter or chartered boat.
Rachel D'Oro AP

Out in Alaska's Bering Sea, about 90 miles from Nome, sits a small, rocky island that used to be home to a couple of hundred Inupiat Eskimos. They lived in houses built on stilts, perched on rocky cliffs.

Then, about 50 years ago, the threat of rock slides, the spread of tuberculosis and the loss of men to World War II forced residents to relocate to the mainland. King Island has been a ghost island ever since.

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The Salt
3:47 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Mastering A Sea Monster: From Greece, A Lesson In Grilling Octopus

For octopus flesh to be tender enough to grill, it must be dried in the sun at least one full day.
Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 3:09 pm

The Greeks have been eating octopus since ancient times, and it's still on the menu of the country's many psarotavernes, or fish taverns.

On the islands, where the catch is often fresh, octopus is grilled over charcoal, seasoned with fresh lemon and served with ouzo. Friends and families often share this special summer meze during a hot day at the beach.

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The Summer of '63
3:24 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Shake, Rattle And Rally: Code Songs Spurred Activism In Birmingham

When played on the radio in 1963, songs like Big Joe Turner's "Shake, Rattle and Roll" were code to Birmingham youths, telling them to assemble.
Jan Persson Redferns

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:11 pm

In 1963, civil rights activists wanted to recruit more of the city's young people to the cause. The way to their hearts was often through DJs and music. These days, Shelley "The Playboy" Stewart is the head of a major marketing firm, but in the 1950s and '60s, he was a popular DJ in Birmingham, Ala.

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North Country News
11:45 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Study Finds No Problems With Vermont Wind Project

Credit WAMC/Pat Bradley

An independent study of noise generated by a Sheffield wind project commissioned by the Vermont Department of Public Service found that noise levels from the turbines were below state limits.

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North Country News
9:30 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Dean Staff Recalls Campaign that Changed Politics

Photo from Dean's Declaration of Candidacy speech Burlington, VT June 23, 2003
Credit John P. Hoke/Flickr

Howard Dean, former staffers and volunteers are set to gather Sunday at Oakledge Park in Burlington to reflect and reminisce on the 10th anniversary of the kickoff of his unsuccessful 2004 presidential campaign.

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North Country News
7:45 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Former Head of Closed Vermont Credit Union Indicted

The only employee of a small northern Vermont credit union that was taken over last year by federal regulators is now facing embezzlement charges.

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