All Things Considered

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All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Federal law says anyone who works for the executive branch of the government has to avoid conflicts of interest. The Treasury secretary cannot own stock in a big bank, for instance. And Richard Painter, who served as ethics adviser under President George W. Bush, says different administrations have typically been scrupulous about following the law.

"Whenever anyone was even considering a position that would be appointed by the president, I would discuss with that person the need to sell off assets that create conflicts of interest," Painter says.

Crime Scene Tape
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Vermont state police are releasing more information about what led to a murder-suicide in Shaftsbury and how it happened.

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An inmate who tried to escape from the Clinton County Jail in Plattsburgh Friday never made it out of the building.

Several hundred people are gathered in Burlington, Vermont, Friday afternoon to express their displeasure with the election of Donald Trump as president.

Picture of a judge's gavel
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A Vermont attorney accused of stealing money from trust accounts has pleaded guilty to mail fraud.

For 130 years, the hulking Bethlehem Steel Mill dominated the economy of eastern Pennsylvania's Northampton County, providing jobs for generations of residents. Today, it's been replaced by a Sands Casino.

"It was thousands of jobs. The entire south side of Bethlehem was built for the residents, the employees of Bethlehem Steel. Now it's nothing," says county resident Keith Hornik, who works at his family's construction company.

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Burlington School District logo
Burlington School District

The School Board in Vermont's largest city has condemned Facebook posts of a board member that were widely deemed racist and sexist.

Amite sculpture on SUNY Plattsburgh campus
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In the wake of the election of Donald Trump and subsequent protests, SUNY Plattsburgh Police are reassuring students and staff that they are taking any potential concerns seriously.

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Poet and singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has died. He was 82.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HALLELUJAH")

LEONARD COHEN: (Singing) Hallelujah, hallelujah, hallelujah...

The election of Donald Trump has sent shock waves through civil rights organizations, including among LGBT activists. They say they fear a rollback in the progress their movement made during the Obama administration. Meanwhile, opponents of gay and lesbian rights also see a shift coming with the Trump administration.

For the past several years, conservatives in the culture wars — those who have felt that their views on same-sex marriage, for example, were under attack — now say they have something to cheer about.

When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who's already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Sarah Weeldreyer, 37, is a stay-at-home-mom with two kids, has been married for 11 years, and is going through a divorce.

In 2016, the polls got it wrong. They failed to predict that Donald Trump was winning key battleground states. But a startup in San Francisco says it spotted it well in advance, not because of the "enthusiasm gap" — Republicans turning out and Democrats staying at home. Instead, the startup Brigade's data pointed to a big crossover effect: Democrats voting for Trump in droves.

The company built an app that asks a simple question: Which candidate are you going to vote for?

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And now a view from some African-Americans in conservative South Carolina. NPR's Debbie Elliott spoke with voters trying to make sense of the election.

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The people who help Donald Trump become the next president of the United States showed a mix of enthusiasm and hope today. We asked some of them around the country about how they feel and what they expect.

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We're also joined now by NPR's Rachel Martin. She'll be hosting our election night special with us which begins in just about 10 minutes. Rachel, welcome.

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Hey, Rachel.

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Next we go to Mississippi Senator Roger Wicker. He's chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. Welcome to the program, Senator.

ROGER WICKER: Thank you, and it's great to be with you.

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We are indeed. We're joined by Senator Claire McCaskill, Democrat from Missouri. She's at the Javits Center in New York for tonight's Clinton campaign event. Senator McCaskill, thanks for joining us today.

CLAIRE MCCASKILL: Thank you for having me.

Picture of Bernie Sanders
Bernie 2016

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders voted Tuesday in his hometown of Burlington, Vermont.

Incisors
Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

Hunters participating in Vermont's 16-day rifle season are being asked to report their results in order to help biologists.

ballot box
Wikimedia Commons

Voters in Huntington, Vermont, are being asked to approve a school bond issue of up to $1.26 million for a geothermal heating and cooling system for the town's elementary school.

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DONALD TRUMP: We are going to win the great state of North Carolina.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

HILLARY CLINTON: Hello, Pittsburgh.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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For decades, one company has pretty much had the monopoly on TV ratings: Nielsen. But, the way people watch TV is changing. A lot of fans are streaming shows from the Internet — not watching on cable TV.

Old-fashioned Nielsen ratings wouldn't show the habits of a family like Kevin Seal's.

Democrat Sue Minter (left) and Republican Phil Scott
Candidates' Facebook pages

Vermont's two top gubernatorial candidates were crisscrossing the state on the final day of the campaign and they have different messages about the economy.

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