All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm

All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

Predictions are for psychics — and in this very unpredictable political season they might do a better job than the pundits. But what about a computer? I set out to see how well it could predict which controversies around the candidates were likely to re-emerge over the course of a month. And two human pundits have agreed to compete against the machine.

Meet the Contestants

The Computer

Maine regulators are considering a $500,000 fine for FairPoint for failing to meet service standards for landline customers during a period that included a four-month strike.

Kujtim Hashani talks about his experience in VSAC’s Talent Search program at an event at Burlington High School
Vermont Student Assistance Corp

The Vermont Student Assistance Corp. is getting a $2.8 million federal grant to encourage young Vermonters to seek higher education.

Amjad Hussain
SUNY Potsdam University Police

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman indicted a former SUNY Potsdam student Monday for hate crimes after making threats against a professor.

Simon Schama calls portraiture "the least free of painterly genres." He writes: "No rose will complain of excessive petal-droop in a still life; no cheese will take you to task over inaccurate veining. ... But portraiture is answerable as no other specialty to something lying beyond the artist's creativity. That something is the sitter paying the bill."

The city of San Francisco is in a quandary. Like many big cities, it faces an affordability crisis, and city leaders are looking for a way to build housing to help low- and middle-income residents stay there.

But one proposal to give current residents of a historically African-American neighborhood help to do that has run afoul of the Obama administration.

Consider the case of Mack Watson. At 96, he is a vision of elegance in his freshly pressed ribbon collar shirt, vest and sports coat. He has called San Francisco home since 1947.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

401(K) 2013/Creative Commons

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin says he's cautiously optimistic that in several weeks the state will have an agreement with the federal government for an "all-payer waiver" to change how health care providers are paid.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Hillary Clinton was back on the campaign trail today. After taking three days to rest from pneumonia, Clinton entered her event with some specially chosen music for the occasion.


There was a time when the most frustrating thing about summer road trips were the lines at the toll booth.

Remember digging through the seats for exact change or scrambling to find the shortest line? Toll collection has come a long way, from handing money to cashiers to simply driving through the booth with an E-ZPass.

But the technology passed through many, often surprising, hands — musicians and spies and NASA scientists — to become the electronic toll booths many highways enjoy today.

'Music Out Of Thin Air'

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Moose on highway
Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is warning drivers to be alert for moose crossing the state’s roads. 

Burlington School District logo
Burlington School District

The Burlington School District says it's working on a plan to improve the racial climate among staff after the director and two other employees of the diversity office complained of discrimination.

Tim Gunn, Emmy-winning co-host of the show Project Runway, says the fashion industry is not making it work for plus-size women.

In an article for The Washington Post, he called it a disgrace.

Burlington Police car
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Some police in Vermont are receiving training on how to de-escalate encounters with people who may be experiencing a mental health crisis.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit


Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

A geologist in Vermont is gathering data to help build a 3-D map of the ground underneath Bennington to try to understand how the potentially cancer causing chemical PFOA may be moving through groundwater.

Leanne Werner
St. Albans Police Department

A former Burlington police officer accused of causing a fatal car wreck last year while off-duty has pleaded guilty to gross negligent driving with death resulting and gross negligent operation with serious injury resulting.

Ballot booth
Heather Katsoulis/Flickr

A federal appeals court in Boston has heard arguments in a challenge to a New Hampshire law that bans voters from posting photos of their completed election ballots.

First, a confession: I've never liked gefilte fish. The slimy, grey balls of fish from a jar have always struck me as icky.

Turns out, I am not alone.

"I had the same experience as you. I never ate gefilte fish," says Liz Alpern. "It was disgusting to me. I literally think I never ate it, until I started making it."

That's a remarkable statement coming from someone in the gefilte fish business. Alpern is half of the team behind the Gefilteria, which makes artisanal gefilte fish. Yes, that is a thing. Alpern gave me a demonstration at a catering kitchen in Brooklyn.

Since Angel Olsen's first album in 2010, she's carved out a smoky, country-flavored corner of the indie rock world for herself. Her distinctive voice delivers taut meditations on love and loneliness, sometimes with a shout and other times with more of a whisper. Her music earned her critical acclaim, but also a reputation as a tortured soul — one she wasn't really looking for.

Governor Peter Shumlin
Courtesy VT Governor's Office

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin will be in the nation's capital Wednesday to seek an "all-payer waiver" from the federal government.

Just after dawn, on a rutted out dirt road west of Las Vegas, Nev., Bureau of Land Management Ranger Shane Nalen steers his four by four over a small hill.

"You never know what you're going to roll up on out here," he says, his dispatch radio squawking in the background.

A panoramic view of the rugged Nevada desert unfolds. But there's also something peculiar. The desert carpet is lit up with reflecting lights shimmering in the soft morning sun.