All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm

All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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After nearly two years without a budget, the state of Illinois and those who depend on it may be running out of time.

Lawmakers are scrambling to approve a new budget before a midnight deadline on Friday but an agreement between Republicans, led by Gov. Bruce Rauner, and the Democratic leaders in the Legislature appears distant.

Say you're headed to a summer cookout or barbecue or a family reunion but you don't want to show up empty-handed. What do you bring that can withstand the heat outdoors and make people happy?

We asked three chefs for their suggestions for dishes that will stand out from all the beans and burgers and slaw and dips sure to be on the table. The goal is to go home with nothing but a clean serving dish.

The relationship between jazz and boxing goes back to the pre-civil rights era, when entertainment and sports were some of only professions in which African Americans could excel. Miles Davis paid tribute to the first African-American world heavyweight champion on his 1971 album, Jack Johnson. Now Steve Coleman has released his own musical tribute to boxing: an album called Morphogenesis.

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copper cables and pipes
Pixabay/Public Domain

A ski industry group is warning ski areas around New Hampshire to keep an eye on their copper.

Representative Ron Hubert
Vermont Legislature

A Vermont state representative will resign from the legislature, citing business and family reasons.

Ali Dieng
photo by Stephanie Seguino / Ali Dieng for Burlington Ward 7/Facebook

Ali Dieng, a native of West Africa, has won a seat on Burlington's City Council.

Vermont Statehouse
WAMC

Vermont’s governor signed a new state budget three days before the start of the next fiscal year.

401(K)2013/Flickr

A plan announced two years ago to give every Vermont baby at least $250 in a college savings account has stalled.

Religion has played an outsized role in U.S. history and politics, but it's one that has often gone unrecognized in U.S. museums.

"As a focused subject area, it's been neglected," says Peter Manseau, a scholar and writer installed last year as the first full-time religion curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

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Right now a world fair is going on in Kazakhstan, in the capital city of Astana. It has a grandiose architecture booth for more than a hundred countries, music, food. One thing it does not have is crowds.

Drive east from Washington and eventually you run smack into the middle of the Chesapeake Bay, the massive estuary that stretches from the mouth of the Susquehanna River at Maryland's northern tip and empties into the Atlantic 200 miles away near Norfolk, Va.

The Chesapeake is home to oysters, clams, and famous Maryland blue crab.

It's the largest estuary in the United States.

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant
NRC/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says a senior radiation protection technician at the closed Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant deliberately falsified safety records for eight months last year.

Officials say customers of telephone and broadband services provider FairPoint Communications won't initially notice much difference after it merges with an Illinois-based telecommunications provider.

Since Senate Republicans released the draft of their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act last week, many people have been wondering how the proposed changes will affect their own coverage, and their family's: Will my pre-existing condition be covered? Will my premiums go up or down?

The bill is still a work in progress, but we've taken a sampling of questions from All Things Considered listeners and answered them, based on what we know now.

What would it cost to protect the nation's voting systems from attack? About $400 million would go a long way, say cybersecurity experts. It's not a lot of money when it comes to national defense — the Pentagon spent more than that last year on military bands alone — but getting funds for election systems is always a struggle.

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has had several confrontations with Chinese authorities. (He was once beaten so badly by police that he had to have brain surgery.) Through it all, Ai continued to make art, and his art continued to travel the world, sometimes without him.

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In recent years, a growing number of news and political sites have popped up in Cuba. Some are taking advantage of what they say is a small but vibrant opening, one offered them since President Obama re-established relations with Cuba.

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Loon feeding chicks
Nina Schoch

Researchers keeping track of loon populations in the Adirondacks are looking for help from volunteers.

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Vermont Public Service Board members from left: Margaret Cheney, Chair Anthony Roisman, Sarah Hofmann
Vermont Public Service Board

The Vermont Public Service Board is changing its name to the Vermont Public Utility Commission.

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Advances in technology have made it much easier, faster and less expensive to do whole genome sequencing — to spell out all three billion letters in a person's genetic code. Falling costs have given rise to speculation that it could soon become a routine part of medical care, perhaps as routine as checking your blood pressure.

But will such tests, which can be done for as little as $1,000, prove useful, or needlessly scary?

In Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Titus Andromedon is a show-stealing character. Tituss Burgess plays the mostly out-of-work actor who's black, gay and an endearing friend to the very naive Kimmy Schmidt.

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