All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm

All Things Consideredis a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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Humans
1:21 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark?

Abraham Lincoln, circa 1850. Lincoln was a political non-entity before he was elected. Why is he more widely known to history than the presidents who came immediately before and after him?
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 12:56 pm

As part of NPR's coverage of this year's presidential election, All Things Considered asked three science reporters to weigh in on the race. The result is a three-part series on the science of leadership. In Part 1, Alix Spiegel looked at the personalities of American presidents. In Part 2, Jon Hamilton examined leadership in the animal kingdom.

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Media
5:53 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Newspaper Endorsements: Prized, But Often Ignored

The power of newspaper endorsements has faded, but candidates still compete for them.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 9:02 pm

This weekend, a slew of newspapers in key swing states including Ohio are expected to release their endorsements for the presidency and other elected positions.

Such external validation is highly prized by candidates, but it's no longer entirely clear why.

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Around the Nation
5:53 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Vote While You Shop: 'Pop-Up' Poll Sites Sweep Iowa

Satellite voting locations, like this one at a Latino grocery in Des Moines, Iowa, are designed to make early voting more convenient.
Sandhya Dirks for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 6:37 pm

In a number of swing states, early voting means many people are already casting their ballots. Typically, that entails voting by mail or visiting a county elections office.

But in Iowa, satellite voting — where "pop-up" polling stations allow people to vote at convenient times and nontraditional locations — is growing in popularity.

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WAMC News
5:45 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Vermont Hospital Receives Drugs from NECC Pharmacy

A Vermont hospital says it's notifying about 200 patients that they were administered drugs recalled by the Massachusetts company linked to a deadly meningitis outbreak.

Officials say the drugs administered at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital were not the same steroid injections that have resulted in 23 deaths around the country and sickened nearly 300.

Jan Puchalski, director of patient safety and risk management, said Tuesday the drugs used include Nalbuphine, which is given for pain, and Hyaluronidase, often used on the eyes.

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WAMC News
5:30 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Vermont AG Accuses Company of Mislabeled Mints

The state Attorney General's office has sued a company called VerMints, saying it has mislabeled its tins of mints as Vermont products.

The suit was filed recently in Washington Superior Court. It says from 2006 to 2010, the company sold over 1.3 million tins prominently labeled "Vermont's All Natural Mints," or "Vermont's All Natural Pastilles." It says many tins also were marked "Product of the USA."

The attorney general's office says the products actually were manufactured at a plant in Canada, mostly out of ingredients that originated outside of Vermont.

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U.S.
5:20 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

As World Series Begins, Detroit Catches Tigers Fever

Fans make their way into the ballpark prior to the Detroit Tigers hosting the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the American League Championship Series at Comerica Park in Detroit.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 6:12 pm

In Detroit, Tigers fans are preparing for the return of their beloved team to the grand stage of the World Series. In a city largely known for hard times these days, the World Series means far more than just a chance at a championship.

Facing high unemployment and crime rates and teetering on the edge of financial collapse, Detroit needs something to celebrate. Maybe something along the lines of the celebration that broke out after the Tigers won the World Series again in 1968.

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World
5:17 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

As Somalia's War Ebbs, Mogadishu Dares To Rebuild

Somalis chat at a beach-side restaurant earlier this month. After two decades of civil war, Somali's capital, Mogadishu, is beginning to recover.
Feisal Omar Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 7:37 pm

There is a remarkable change going on in Mogadishu, Somalia — often dubbed the world's most dangerous city. For starters, it may not deserve that title anymore.

Last year, African Union forces drove the Islamist militant group al-Shabab out of Mogadishu. Now, Somalia has a new president and prime minister who have replaced the corrupt and unpopular transitional government.

Hope is edging aside despair, and Mogadishu is coming back to life.

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WAMC News
5:15 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Vermont Credit Union Records Sent to Landfill

The Vermont State Employees Credit Union says unencrypted computer tapes containing personal data and transaction records of about 85,000 members were inadvertently thrown into a landfill.

Credit union CEO Steven Post says there's no evidence any of the information has fallen into the wrong hands.

Post says it appears data tapes were buried in a landfill and cannot be retrieved.

The credit union is working with regulators and law enforcement.

Animals
4:54 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

In Animal Kingdom, Voting Of A Different Sort Reigns

A school of manini fish passes over a coral reef at Hanauma Bay in 2005, in Honolulu. Researchers say schooling behavior like the kind seen in fish helps groups of animals make better decisions than any one member of the group could.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 9:57 am

As part of NPR's coverage of this year's presidential election, All Things Considered asked three science reporters to weigh in on the race. The result is a three-part series on the science of leadership. In Part 1, Alix Spiegel looked at the personalities of American presidents.

Voters could learn some things about choosing a leader from a fish. Or a chimp. Or an elephant.

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Law
4:43 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Three Ballot Measures Would OK Pot Beyond Medicine

A marijuana bud at a marijuana dispensary in Denver. Colorado, Oregon and Washington could become the first to legalize marijuana this fall.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 5:53 pm

Marijuana legalization is back on the ballot this year. California voters defeated a legalization proposal in 2010, but now similar measures have cropped up in three more Western states. This time around, some of the most intense opposition is coming from the earlier pioneers of legalization — the medical marijuana industry.

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