The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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  Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 50  books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays including Cat's Eye, Alias Grace, and A Handmaid’s Tale. Her latest, The Heart Goes Last, is a funny disturbing tale about a new future in which the lawful are locked up and the lawless roam free.


  At the Water’s Edge is a love story about a privileged young woman’s awakening as she experiences the devastation of World War II in a tiny village in the Scottish Highlands.

In the new novel from the author of the bestselling Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen demonstrates her talent for creating period pieces.

  In his new book of investigative reporting, Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyber-attack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.

Ted Koppel is a 42-year veteran of ABC News and was anchor and managing editor of Nightline from 1980 to 2005. 

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

  Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. Previously he worked at The Washington Post.

He is the author of three New York Times best-sellers: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers; a collection of his New Yorker articles titled What the Dog Saw and most recently, David and Goliath

This episode was recorded live at The White Hart Inn in Salisbury, CT and presented by Oblong Books and Music. 

  Adam Johnson is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel about North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son.

Johnson’s new book - Fortune Smiles – is a collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering a new way of looking at the world. The collection was just named a National Book Award finalist.

  John Lahr is an acclaimed theater critic. Since 1992 he’s been the Senior Drama Critic for The New Yorker magazine.

He’s the author of such books as Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh, and the brand new, Joy Ride. The book is a collection of Lahr’s New Yorker profiles and reviews which explore the lives of the theatricals.

  Ron Rash’s latest, Above the Waterfall, takes place in and around a state park in the Appalachian Mountains.

The characters are haunted by eco-terrorism, a school shooting, and crystal meth addiction – but several of his characters can find solace in the trees, flowers, and fields that surround them.

  Stephen King calls Abigail Thomas "the Emily Dickinson of memoirists."

Her latest book, What Comes Next and How to Like It, is an extraordinarily moving memoir about many things, but at the center is a steadfast friendship between Abigail Thomas and a man she met thirty-five years ago.

  Richard Price is known for his bestsellers Clockers and Freedomland as well as writing for the HBO hit – The Wire.

His latest book, The Whites, is a tale of a New York City police detective under siege by an unsolved murder, his own dark past, and a violent stalker out of revenge.

  In 2008, Brian Selznick’s groundbreaking book The Invention of Hugo Cabret was awarded the Caldecott Medal. It was nominated for a National Book Award and was the basis for Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film Hugo.

His follow up illustrated novel, Wonderstruck, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. His newest illustrated novel is The Marvels where two seemingly unrelated stories - one in words, the other in pictures - come together.