The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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Twitter: @The_Book_Show

  Tina Packer is one of the country’s foremost experts on Shakespeare and theatre arts and now the actor, director, and master teacher offers an exploration of the women of Shakespeare’s plays in her new book: Women of Will: Following the Feminine in Shakespeare's Plays.

  Novelist Jane Smiley is in the middle of her Last Hundred Years trilogy about the Langdon family.

While last year’s Some Luck followed the Langdon family through the depression, her new novel, Early Warning, tells their story as the country moves into the Cold War, through the social and sexual revolutions of the 1960s and ’70s and into the materialism of the ’80s.

  Reeling from the Great Depression, the United States and Germany elected two new leaders of diametrically opposing ideologies. In 1932, Franklin Roosevelt won the presidency and Adolf Hitler became chancellor.

Author and historian David Pietrusza will discuss his new book - 1932: The Rise of Hitler and FDR–Two Tales of Politics, Betrayal, and Unlikely Destiny.

Following his acclaimed Atlantic and The Men Who United the States, New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester offers an enthralling biography of the Pacific Ocean and its role in the modern world, exploring our relationship with this imposing force of nature. Simon Winchester discusses his new book, Pacific, on this week’s Book Show.

  Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 50  books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays including Cat's Eye, Alias Grace, and A Handmaid’s Tale. Her latest, The Heart Goes Last, is a funny disturbing tale about a new future in which the lawful are locked up and the lawless roam free.

  

  At the Water’s Edge is a love story about a privileged young woman’s awakening as she experiences the devastation of World War II in a tiny village in the Scottish Highlands.

In the new novel from the author of the bestselling Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen demonstrates her talent for creating period pieces.

  In his new book of investigative reporting, Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyber-attack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.

Ted Koppel is a 42-year veteran of ABC News and was anchor and managing editor of Nightline from 1980 to 2005. 

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

  Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. Previously he worked at The Washington Post.

He is the author of three New York Times best-sellers: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers; a collection of his New Yorker articles titled What the Dog Saw and most recently, David and Goliath

This episode was recorded live at The White Hart Inn in Salisbury, CT and presented by Oblong Books and Music. 

  Adam Johnson is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel about North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son.

Johnson’s new book - Fortune Smiles – is a collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering a new way of looking at the world. The collection was just named a National Book Award finalist.

  John Lahr is an acclaimed theater critic. Since 1992 he’s been the Senior Drama Critic for The New Yorker magazine.

He’s the author of such books as Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh, and the brand new, Joy Ride. The book is a collection of Lahr’s New Yorker profiles and reviews which explore the lives of the theatricals.

  Ron Rash’s latest, Above the Waterfall, takes place in and around a state park in the Appalachian Mountains.

The characters are haunted by eco-terrorism, a school shooting, and crystal meth addiction – but several of his characters can find solace in the trees, flowers, and fields that surround them.

  Stephen King calls Abigail Thomas "the Emily Dickinson of memoirists."

Her latest book, What Comes Next and How to Like It, is an extraordinarily moving memoir about many things, but at the center is a steadfast friendship between Abigail Thomas and a man she met thirty-five years ago.

  Richard Price is known for his bestsellers Clockers and Freedomland as well as writing for the HBO hit – The Wire.

His latest book, The Whites, is a tale of a New York City police detective under siege by an unsolved murder, his own dark past, and a violent stalker out of revenge.

  In 2008, Brian Selznick’s groundbreaking book The Invention of Hugo Cabret was awarded the Caldecott Medal. It was nominated for a National Book Award and was the basis for Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film Hugo.

His follow up illustrated novel, Wonderstruck, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. His newest illustrated novel is The Marvels where two seemingly unrelated stories - one in words, the other in pictures - come together. 

  Coming up on this week’s Book Show - Joe Donahue speaks with Pulitzer Prize–winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger about the life and work of the most famous architect of our time Frank Gehry.

Goldberger's book is Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry.

  Robert Goolrick’s most recent novel, The Fall of Princes, is set in 1980’s New York City, a time when Wall Street ruled, drugs were in constant supply, and jockeying for power was the name of the game. We meet Rooney, who tells the story of how he and a group of other young Princes made it to the top and then, one by one, took a fall.

  Alex Kershaw is an acclaimed WWII and best-selling historian.

His latest book - Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family’s Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris - recounts the story of one family’s heroic efforts to defeat the evil in their midst.

  In her new story collection, Almost Famous Women, writer Megan Mayhew Bergman takes us into the lives of independent, inventive women at the margins of history.

Bergman has written fictionalized accounts of real-life, risk-taking women who have largely been forgotten.

  Tony winner Mary Louise Wilson -- forever dubbed "the best thing in it" in review after review – has written a memoir about her life in the theatre, movies and television. My First Hundred Years in Show Business tells Wilson’s story through the eight-year journey of turning a memoir of Vogue editor Diana Vreeland into the career-peak triumph Full Gallop, the show that made Wilson a star in her 60s.

Mary Louise Wilson's numerous award-winning roles include Vera Joseph in 4000 Miles at Lincoln Center, Big Edie in Grey Gardens (Tony Award), Fraulein Schneider in Cabaret (Tony nomination), Queen Elizabeth in The Beard of Avon (Drama Desk nomination) and Diana Vreeland in Full Gallop (Drama Desk Award). Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times, and she teaches acting at Tulane University. She is fresh from finishing a run on stage in the hit revival of On The Twentieth Century.

This Book Show was recorded at The Morton Memorial Library in Rhinecliff, NY, presented by Oblong Books and Music.

  Dennis Mahoney’s new novel, Bell Weather, is a mystery-adventure about a young woman confronting dangers in a re-imagined, fantastical 18th century. Consider it a big, old-fashioned suspense story set in a strangely familiar world.

Mahoney is also the author of Fellow Mortals, a Booklist Top 10 debut in 2013.

  Erik Larson has made a career of bringing half-remembered history to vivid, vibrant life. He has done so in his best-sellers: The Devil in the White City, Thunderstruck, In the Garden of Beasts, and Isaac’s Storm.

Widely acclaimed as the master of page-turning non-fiction sagas, he now brings another past event alive – this time, the last crossing of the Lusitania.

  David Gates was anointed by New York magazine as “a true heir to both Raymond Carver and John Cheever.”

He now has a new collection of stories and a novella. A Hand Reached Down to Guide Me includes eleven stories and the novella, Banishment. The collection is his first in 15-years.

  Two-time Pulitzer winner, New York Times-bestselling author, and master historian David McCullough brings to life two of the most iconic figures in American history in his new book, The Wright Brothers.

Regarded by many in their times as mere “bicycle mechanics,” Wilbur and Orville Wright were in reality self-taught geniuses of truly exceptional capacity of mind, pioneering scientific explorers, and the men who taught the world how to fly.

  Two-time Pulitzer winner, New York Times-bestselling author, and master historian David McCullough brings to life two of the most iconic figures in American history in his new book, The Wright Brothers.

Regarded by many in their times as mere “bicycle mechanics,” Wilbur and Orville Wright were in reality self-taught geniuses of truly exceptional capacity of mind, pioneering scientific explorers, and the men who taught the world how to fly.

David McCullough won Pulitzers for his biographies, Truman and John Adams. He is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award.

This is an “Off the Shelf” edition of the Book Show in partnership with Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, NY and recorded before a live audience.

  Paula Hawkins’ debut novel, The Girl on the Train has already received rave reviews and has topped the New York Times Bestsellers list.

It tells the story of Rachel Watson, a commuter who is obsessed with a "perfect" couple she sees from the train that just happens to live a few houses away from her ex-husband. When the wife of the couple goes missing, Rachel gets involved.

  Norman Lear is a legendary broadcast pioneer, known for creating some of the most acclaimed and top-rated television series of all time. They include: All in the Family, Good Times, The Jeffersons, Maude, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, One Day at a Time, and Sanford & Son. He has just written a memoir called, Even This I Get To Experience.

  T. C. Boyle has been called by the New York Times - "one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation." Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections.

His newest book, The Harder They Come, explores anti-authoritarianism and the bloodshed that can accompany it.

Felix Clay / http://www.theguardian.com/

  British mystery and crime writer, Ruth Rendell, one of the most prolific authors in the genre with more than 60 novels, died at the age of 85 on May 2nd following a stroke in January.

We remember her, and her popular protagonist Chief Inspector Wexford, on this week’s Book Show.

  Frankie Bailey is a Professor of Criminal Justice, she’s also the author of mysteries as well as non-fiction titles that explore the intersections of crime, history, and popular culture.

In her new novel, What the Fly Saw, she looks at the real world of police work and criminal law and speculates on how they might change in the near future.

    Often called the dean of writers about the American West, Ivan Doig is the author of such national bestsellers as The Whistling Season and The Bartender's Tale.

In his latest novel, Sweet Thunder, he reprises his beloved character, Morrie Morgan, to take on the power of the press in an era of intense corporate greed and social unrest.

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