The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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  Steve Berry is the author of fifteen historical novels. His latest, The 14th Colony, deals with presidential succession, potential disaster at the inauguration, and a real plan, never carried out, to invade Canada and make it The 14th Colony.

Berry’s protagonist, Cotton Malone, must stop disaster before it happens, which is only a few hours away. 

  Louis Begley, best known for his masterful observations of life in New York City’s upper crust, made his thriller debut with Killer Come Hither.

That book told the story of former Marine Corps officer turned novelist and Yale Alum, Jack Dana. Now Begley continues Jack’s story in the sequel, Kill and Be Killed.

  Augusten Burroughs is the author of such best-selling autobiographical works as Running with Scissors, Dry, and Magical Thinking.

His latest is called Lust & Wonder in which he chronicles the development and demise of the different relationships he's had while living in New York, he examines what it means to be in love, what it means to be in lust, and what it means to be figuring it out.

  Gone with the Mind is Mark Leyner’s latest novel – in which a character named Mark Leyner is to give a reading from his autobiography, also entitled Gone with the Mind, in a mall food court. 

  Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Charles Duhigg’s first book The Power of Habit has spent over 150 weeks on the NYT bestseller lists.

In his new book, Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business, he looks to explain why some people and companies are able to get so much more done than others. 

  Writer Tracy Chevalier spins fiction from history. Her new novel, At the Edge of the Orchard, takes us back to the Gold Rush era to tell the tale of a pioneer family on the American frontier.

  In his new novel The Doubter’s Almanac, Ethan Canin – the author of America, America and The Palace Thief explores the nature of genius,  rivalry, ambition, and love among multiple generations of a gifted family.

  In his new book, Missoula, journalist Jon Krakauer investigates a spate of campus rapes that occurred in Missoula over a four-year period.

Taking the town as a case study for a crime that is sadly prevalent throughout the nation, Krakauer documents the experiences of five victims: their fear and self-doubt in the aftermath; the skepticism directed at them by police, prosecutors, and the public; their bravery in pushing forward and what is cost them.

  Debbie Macomber has been dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

She has 200 million books in print; the newest, A Girl’s Guide to Moving On, is about a mother and her daughter-in-law who both leave their respective troubled marriages and lean on each other while starting over.

  Elizabeth Brundage is the author of the novels A Stranger Like You, Somebody Else's Daughter, and The Doctor's Wife.

Her latest is All Things Cease to Appear, where late on winter afternoon in upstate, New York, George Clare comes home to find his wife murdered and their three-year-old daughter alone in her room across the hall. The novel is a complex portrait of a psychopath and a marriage.

  Irvine Welsh returns to Edinburgh, the home of Trainspotting and so many of his novels since, with a new novel – A Decent Ride -  featuring one of his most iconic and beloved characters—'Juice' Terry Lawson—that's thick on the Scottish brogue, heavy on the filth and masterful in its comedic timing.

  Carol Goodman is the critically acclaimed author of The Book of Dead Languages and The Seduction of Water.

Her latest, River Road, is a psychological thriller about a college professor accused of killing her favorite student in a hit-and-run accident and the secrets that emerge as she desperately tries to clear her name. 

    

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

    

 Ernest Cline’s debut novel, Ready Player One was a New York Times best-seller in 2012. The film version of that novel is being directed by Steven Spielberg.

Cline returns with a new 80’s nostalgic video game themed thriller entitled, Armada.

Armada tells the story of Zach Lightman – an aimless teenage gamer with anger issues looking to save the universe.

  Samantha Hunt’s third novel, Mr. Splitfoot, tracks two women in two times as they march toward a mysterious reckoning. The novel is a contemporary gothic, a subversive ghost story and a compelling mystery. Hunt's work has been performed on This American Life and on NPR's Selected Shorts program.

  My Life on the Road is Gloria Steinem's first book in over 20 years.

It it, the writer, activist, and organizer offers a candid account of how her early years led her to an on-the-road kin of life; traveling, listening to people, learning, and creating change.

  The devastation of Pearl Harbor and the American victory at Midway were prelude to a greater challenge: rolling back the vast Japanese Pacific Empire, island by island.

Historian Ian Toll’s new book, The Conquering Tide, encompasses the heart of the Pacific War—the period between mid-1942 and mid-1944.

  Tina Packer is one of the country’s foremost experts on Shakespeare and theatre arts and now the actor, director, and master teacher offers an exploration of the women of Shakespeare’s plays in her new book: Women of Will: Following the Feminine in Shakespeare's Plays.

  Novelist Jane Smiley is in the middle of her Last Hundred Years trilogy about the Langdon family.

While last year’s Some Luck followed the Langdon family through the depression, her new novel, Early Warning, tells their story as the country moves into the Cold War, through the social and sexual revolutions of the 1960s and ’70s and into the materialism of the ’80s.

  Reeling from the Great Depression, the United States and Germany elected two new leaders of diametrically opposing ideologies. In 1932, Franklin Roosevelt won the presidency and Adolf Hitler became chancellor.

Author and historian David Pietrusza will discuss his new book - 1932: The Rise of Hitler and FDR–Two Tales of Politics, Betrayal, and Unlikely Destiny.

Following his acclaimed Atlantic and The Men Who United the States, New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester offers an enthralling biography of the Pacific Ocean and its role in the modern world, exploring our relationship with this imposing force of nature. Simon Winchester discusses his new book, Pacific, on this week’s Book Show.

  Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 50  books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays including Cat's Eye, Alias Grace, and A Handmaid’s Tale. Her latest, The Heart Goes Last, is a funny disturbing tale about a new future in which the lawful are locked up and the lawless roam free.

  

  At the Water’s Edge is a love story about a privileged young woman’s awakening as she experiences the devastation of World War II in a tiny village in the Scottish Highlands.

In the new novel from the author of the bestselling Water for Elephants, Sara Gruen demonstrates her talent for creating period pieces.

  In his new book of investigative reporting, Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyber-attack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared.

Ted Koppel is a 42-year veteran of ABC News and was anchor and managing editor of Nightline from 1980 to 2005. 

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

  Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. Previously he worked at The Washington Post.

He is the author of three New York Times best-sellers: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers; a collection of his New Yorker articles titled What the Dog Saw and most recently, David and Goliath

This episode was recorded live at The White Hart Inn in Salisbury, CT and presented by Oblong Books and Music. 

  Adam Johnson is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel about North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son.

Johnson’s new book - Fortune Smiles – is a collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering a new way of looking at the world. The collection was just named a National Book Award finalist.

  John Lahr is an acclaimed theater critic. Since 1992 he’s been the Senior Drama Critic for The New Yorker magazine.

He’s the author of such books as Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh, and the brand new, Joy Ride. The book is a collection of Lahr’s New Yorker profiles and reviews which explore the lives of the theatricals.

  Ron Rash’s latest, Above the Waterfall, takes place in and around a state park in the Appalachian Mountains.

The characters are haunted by eco-terrorism, a school shooting, and crystal meth addiction – but several of his characters can find solace in the trees, flowers, and fields that surround them.

  Stephen King calls Abigail Thomas "the Emily Dickinson of memoirists."

Her latest book, What Comes Next and How to Like It, is an extraordinarily moving memoir about many things, but at the center is a steadfast friendship between Abigail Thomas and a man she met thirty-five years ago.

  Richard Price is known for his bestsellers Clockers and Freedomland as well as writing for the HBO hit – The Wire.

His latest book, The Whites, is a tale of a New York City police detective under siege by an unsolved murder, his own dark past, and a violent stalker out of revenge.

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